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 Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)

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carla comoda

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Tue Jul 14, 2009 3:38 pm


===Green Campus Computing==


The computer is the most important invention of the twentieth century. Computers are touching every part of our lives because of the rapidly decreasing cost of personal computers, the increasing dependence of large organization on large computer, and modern society’s need to make decisions quickly and accurately. The progress of the technological advances promoted the spread of computers into activities that were once the preserve of people- activities such as managing the collection and distribution of information in organizations. We are aware that the computers still continue to increase its influence on our lives throughout the foreseeable future. Even though computers give us a benefit especially to us students we should take good care. Mostly every university has a computer laboratory and each of us student has the right to use the computers because we use it for making an assignment and having research but we cant deny the fact that sometimes we, student s forget to follow the rules and regulations during and after using computer like turn off the computer after used. Here is the Green campus computing to explain the important of computer to our lives although the computer has a disadvantage and advantage. Green campus computing is the positive (or least negative) relationship between the physical computer and its impact to the environments in which it moves through during its journey from cradle to grave. In this context the computer’s impact to the various environments may be measured using any number of the following criteria;
From cradle: Materials from which components are manufactured (recycled or virgin
materials, materials which can be recycled, least toxic
materials); effluents/by products
produced in the manufacturing process (impact of effluents/by products on the
environment); assembly methods (ease the disassembly at end of life); packaging
materials used for components to facilitate storage and shipping (recycled or virgin
materials, materials which can be recycled).
Operational use: Power consumption of each component; interface with user; life cycle
(months/years before replacement is required); other consumables required to maintain.
End of use: Ability to reallocate if no longer required; supplier willing to take computer
components back under recycling program.
To grave: Effective recycling (ease of disassembly, recycle ability
of materials); CO2
travel points (number of miles travelled and fuel consumed to get all components to their
final destination); and responsible and safe disposal of toxic components.

Razz

Here are some ways to suggest ways how the university can adopt this concept .
*When you're not using your computer, you can save energy by putting it to "sleep." When your computer is in sleep, it's turned on but in a low power mode. It takes less time for a computer to wake up from sleep than it does for the computer to start up after being turned off. You can put your computer to sleep right away by choosing Apple menu > Sleep. You can also choose to put the computer to sleep automatically when your computer has been inactive for a specified amount of time. You can also set only the display to sleep. If your computer is in the middle of a task that you want to let finish while you are away (for example, burning a DVD), you should set only the display to sleep.
*Change the desktop background on ALL UF computers to a simple black screen, which uses less power
*Use less lighting when possible (many classrooms have a ridiculous amount of light, with some lighted tiles touching one another. In many cases, using half this light would still be sufficient, especially on sunny days). A special switch, either a dimmer or a "half on" switch could be used to control lighting used on brighter days.
*Practice the 4Rs: reduce, reuse, recycle and buy products with recycled content.
* Recycle your old cell phone to prevent hazardous substances from entering our environment. These substances include lead, arsenic, and cadmium, which have been linked with cancer, neurological disorders, and developmental abnormalities. Some helpful links: www.recyclewirelessphones.org and Wireless Foundation’s “Donate a Phone” program: www.wirelessfoundation.org.
* If it’s possible, download software from the web instead of purchasing a physical installation disc.
* Use email instead of faxes.



URL's
http://www.isc.uoguelph.ca/documents/061211GreenComputingFinalReport2006_000.pdf
http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogsection&id=7&Itemid=39
http://www.sustainable.ufl.edu/forum/archive/suggest-ways-to-reduce-energy-on-campus/
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Gleizelle Jen Dieparine

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Tue Jul 14, 2009 4:25 pm

GREEN CAMPUS COMPUTING

Razz Southern
Maryland Electric Cooperative and St. Mary’s County Public Schools


http://www.thebaynet.com/news/index.cfm/fa/viewstory/story_ID/12459


Schools signed a joint resolution on March 11,
The program is an energy efficiency and fundraising program
targeting elementary school



“It is our desire to educate all students
about ways to conserve energy, and this will serve as a way for our students to
become better stewards of our environment and resources.”


bounce University can
adopt this Concept:


Asit stated above the school the school has the aim to educate the elementary
student in conserving energy while they where young they can manipulate
themselves to be stewards of our environment .


The university should be the one who will
educate student and lead the student in conserving energy. The
university should implement some ways conserving energy as well as student.We
should have enough knowledge in the
cause and effect of wasting energy .



Razz The Lawrenceville School’s Green Campus Initiative

http://www.lawrenceville.org/about/green_campus/index.asp

The Lawrenceville School has undertaken a “Green Campus
Initiative” seeking to take a holistic approach to campus sustainability. The
initiative focuses on campus energy, materials, land, and water use applying
methods that promote ecological literacy, sustainability education and involve
the broader community outside of the school.


The Lawrenceville School’s environment makes an aesthetic
impression on those who come to campus while simultaneously presenting a
pedagogical mission. The campus in particular, with the legacy of alumnus Aldo
Leopold and foundational landscape design by Fredrick Law Olmstead, provides
unique educational opportunities for students and the local community. As a
result, students, faculty, staff, and citizens who work, learn, and live on and
around our campus can gai
n
a new dimension to their learning experience, and an increased appreciation of
the natural world.


bounce University can adopt this Concept


The university can adopt this concept by promoting methods for conserving energy . Provides
unique educational opportunities for students and the local community for the
one who are learning here in our university can appreciate the natural world by
the help of one another if we educate our self in conserving energy.








Razz SanDiegoState Green Campus Program


http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=23&Itemid=40

When you're
not using your computer, you can save energy by putting it to "sleep."
When your computer is in sleep, it's turned on but in a low power mode. It
takes less time for a computer to wake up from sleep than it does for the
computer to start up after being turned off.



You can put your computer to sleep right away by choosing
Apple menu > Sleep. You can also choose to put the computer to sleep
automatically when your computer has been inactive for a specified amount of
time. You can also set only the display to sleep. If your computer is in the
middle of a task that you want to let finish while you are away (for example,
burning a DVD), you should set only the display to sleep.


bounceUniversity can
adopt this Concept:


It can help the university in conserving energy . It can lessen the energy consumption . But then if you finished using the computer,
you should shut down the computer instead leaving it all behind .

visit my blog

http://gleizelle.blogspot.com/

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katherine eng lajom

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Wed Jul 15, 2009 12:09 am

As define by Wiki, Green Computing is the study and practice of using computing resources efficiently.

Objective: Is to account for the triple bottom line, an expanded spectrum of values and criteria for measuring organizational (and societal) success.

Goals: To reduce the use of hazardous materials, maximize energy efficiency during the product's lifetime, and promote recyclability or biodegradability of defunct products and factory waste.

Modern IT systems rely upon a complicated mix of people, networks and hardware; as such, a green computing initiative must be systemic in nature, and address increasingly sophisticated problems. Elements of such a solution may comprise items such as end user satisfaction, management restructuring, regulatory compliance, disposal of electronic waste, telecommuting, virtualization of server resources, energy use, thin client solutions, and return on investment (ROI)


In other words it is the environmentally responsible use of energy. As far as computers and other electronic equipments are concerned, the problem is that environmentally harmful substances are used in these products. It is even more impossible to recycle the majority of this equipment and improper disposal to these materials is becoming a major problem.

Another characteristic of these equipments is their energy consumption levels. Since all methods of electricity generation have a negative effect on the environment, it is important to save energy. Computers in offices are left running continuously and thereby consume a lot of energy.

Same scenario is being observed inside the university. Computer units are left running continuously inside the computer laboratories and to some offices inside the campus. Though some of them are in exception because there are units made to make transactions perhaps we can implement some the tips (below) in the computer laboratories.


Below are the three URLs I have surfed from the net…


[URL 1]: http://web.mit.edu/ist/initiatives/it-energy/guidelines.html


What can I do to “green” my technology use?

* Enable power management on your computer.
* Power down the computer and monitor when not in use.
* Consider plugging your computer and peripherals into a power strip with an on/off switch and turn the entire power strip off when not in use.
* Think before you print. Do you really need a paper copy?
* Use recycled paper if possible
* Use Print Preview to review your job before printing it
* Print in black and white whenever possible.
* Print two-sided whenever possible.
* Reuse unnecessary print jobs as scratch paper.
* Advertise events, parties, etc. electronically or with chalk instead of print-outs.
* Recycle!
o Use the recycling bins around campus to recycle paper, glass, aluminum, and plastic
o Toner on campus can be brought to ISR for recycling
o Beloit College computers and laptop batteries can be brought to ISR for recycling
o Locations for recycling home computers can be found here
o Recycle used alkaline batteries in Pearsons by the mail center or in the Library
* Use email instead of faxes
* If you are in the market for a new computer at home, consider buying an Energy Star compliant computer
* If it’s possible, download software from the web instead of purchasing a physical installation disc.


[Click the corresponding link above to learn more about Green Computing.]


This site has listed some effective ways to help conserve energy. We can implement these tips in our own campus and I believe these tips are not that hard to follow. Imagine how many desktops computers in computer laboratories, offices and library/ies are turned on all day long. Are we aware of how much energy consumption we have daily? Some on the list is impossible to be implemented but let us just ask ourselves in some other way on how to help lessen energy consumption and avoid misusage of computer units.


[URL 2]: http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html

The image shown above is the front page of the University of Colorado’s Green Computing Guide, it is a booklet to promote Green Computing inside the university.

The guide expresses the University’s concern on the rapid growth of energy consumption. According to the guide’s introduction,


“The growing use of computers on campus has caused a dramatic increase in energy consumption, putting negative pressure on CU’s budget and the environment. Each year more and more computers are purchased and put to use, but it’s not just the number of computers that is driving energy consumption upward. The way that we use computers also adds to the increasing energy burden. Research reveals that most personal desktop computers are not being used the majority of the time they are running and many personal computers nationwide are needlessly left on continuously. Every time we leave computers or lights on we waste electricity. Burning fossil fuels generates most of our electricity and it also emits pollutants, sulfur, and carbon dioxide into the air. These emissions can cause respiratory disease, smog, acid rain and global climate change.”


In connection to the introduction above, they (the University of Colorado at Boulder) have listed some of their specific suggestions that may make each and every one of us possible to somehow reduce energy consumption.


ü Unless you require immediate access to e-mail or other Internet services, break the habit of turning on all your computer equipment as soon as you enter the office each day.

ü If practical, informally group your computer activities and try to do then during one or two parts of the day, leaving the computer off at other times.

ü Avoid using the switch on a powerstrip to turn on all your equipment.

ü If you use a laser printer, don’t turn your printer on until you are ready to print.

ü Turn off your entire computer system (CPU, monitor and printer) or at least your monitor and printer when you go to lunch or will be out of office for a meeting or an errand.

ü For “computer servers” which must be on to serve network functions, explore ways to turn servers off at night.

ü If monitors are not needed for “servers” to operate, keep server monitors off. If server monitor is needed during the day, at least turn it off at night and weekends.


This site is just one of the many institutions who presented their program goals in implementing green campus computing. I believe we can adopt the same program by implementing it in our university. If our university will acknowledge such, we can express our concern about saving and conserving energy. They also consider some other factor that adds to the increasing energy burden: the way we use our computers units.


Last year, while some of my classmates were making the same assignment, I have heard in between discussions that using screen savers saves no energy. I must admit that I am not aware of it because I am fond of toying with my laptop and putting different colorful screensavers on it. Every little thing starts with one self and for a start, I use screen savers no more.


[URL 3]: www.colorado.edu/its/docs/energy.html


“In 2002 the Vice Chancellor for Administration adopted a campus policy to reduce energy use per square foot of campus building, with a goal of stabilizing or reducing total energy consumption and emissions. One of the key actionable measures is enabling desktop power management features. The campus energy strategy map outlines steps that need to be taken to conserve energy on campus. One of these steps is to incorporate operational efficiencies in equipment purchases. “


In relation to the URL 2, green computing has been adopted by the university as a campus policy. By adopting green computing to our campus, I believe we all have the same missions and goals as other institutions have. We can have the same policy, if our school will acknowledge each little way of conserving energy and computer operating costs each year, the university administration should implement this practice in the campus. Each and everyone us should be committed to energy conservation through environmental leadership, we must address the issue of responsible computer use. We can start a step by creating an assembly supported by the faculty, staff and the whole studentry of the University.[/justify][/justify]
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PostSubject: Assignment 4 -Green Campus Computing   Wed Jul 15, 2009 3:40 am

4. Find three(3) URL's that talk's about "green campus computing" and suggest ways how the university can adopt this concept.

The three URL’s that I found that talks about “Green Campus Computing” are the following:
http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_computing
http://searchdatacenter.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid80_gci1246959,00.html#

Green Computing is the environmentally responsible use of computers and related resources. It is the study and practice of using computing resources efficiently. One of its goals is to lessen the use of hazardous materials and maximize the energy efficiency during the product’s lifetime.
Some of its practices include the following:
- Implementation of energy-efficient central processing units, servers and peripherals
- reduced resource consumption
- Proper disposal of electronic waste (e-waste).
-Reusing and Recycling
So, when we talk about green campus computing, we are absolutely talking about the responsible ways of using computers inside a particular universities or schools.

Every year more and more computers are purchased and are used by many establishments including schools. As an IT student, we should be alarmed with the danger these large number of computers give. Every university are using this machine (computers) for record keeping, during the discussions, laboratory exercises of the student (especially those computer related course), well in every corner of the university almost everyone is using this breakthroughs. And because of this, it is considered as the cause of the dramatic increase in energy consumption causing it to be the main reason why a certain university has a high budget on paying the electricity bills. Another thing is that, we should also consider paper use, toner cartridges, disposal of old computer equipment and purchasing decisions when considering new computer equipment. So it is essential that every one of us would be encouraged to adopt this green campus computing.

You can take a giant step toward environmentally responsible or “green” computing by conserving energy with your computer. There are some ways that a university may follow to be able to adopt this concept. These may include:
1. Never leave your computers or lights ON to avoid wasting electricity.
2. Power-down the CPU and all peripherals during extended periods of inactivity.
3. Try to do computer-related tasks during contiguous, intensive blocks of time, leaving hardware off at other times.
4. Power-up and power-down energy-intensive peripherals such as laser printers according to need.
5. Use liquid-crystal-display (LCD) monitors rather than cathode-ray-tube (CRT) monitors.
6. Use notebook computers rather than desktop computers whenever possible.
7. Use the power-management features to turn off hard drives and displays after several minutes of inactivity.
8. Minimize the use of paper and properly recycle waste paper.
9. Dispose of e-waste according to federal, state and local regulations.
10. Employ alternative energy sources for computing workstations, servers, networks and data centers.
11. Avoid using screen savers in computer monitors.
These are just few tips that we can apply in our university. But I suggest that everyone must be responsible enough and lets practice
GREEN CAMPUS COMPUTING.

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PostSubject: Green Campus Computing   Wed Jul 15, 2009 3:11 pm

Green Campus Computing? Does it familiar to you? if not read this and get learned!.


Green campus computing is a study based on how you can conserve energy and resources but still using the gadget or technologies, practically green campus computing refers to proper ways of using computers.

Some tips to reduce energy consumption:

1.PUTTING YOUR COMPUTER TO SLEEP

When you're not using your computer, you can save energy by putting it to "sleep." When your computer is in sleep, it's turned on but in a low power mode. It takes less time for a computer to wake up from sleep than it does for the computer to start up after being turned off.
You can put your computer to sleep right away by choosing Apple menu > Sleep. You can also choose to put the computer to sleep automatically when your computer has been inactive for a specified amount of time. You can also set only the display to sleep. If your computer is in the middle of a task that you want to let finish while you are away (for example, burning a DVD), you should set only the display to sleep.

2. PRACTICE TURNING OFF YOUR DEVICE
Do not leave the computer running when no one is using it. Turn off your computer when not in use. But if, you still want to relax after a long period of research (and still not yet done) put off your monitor or put it into standby mode. You may also turn off your hard disk before your computer goes on standby, select a time in Turn off hard disks.It is monitor or computer you may turned off to reduce energy consumption other device may have be turned off like speakers when your in silent mood, printers when your not ready yet to print your documents or enhancements when not in use.

3. REVIEWING YOUR ENCODED DOCUMENTS BEFORE PRINTING

It is like hitting two birds in one stone, you will conserve energy at the same time bond papers and ink.Besides electricity and paper, computers use diskettes and printers consume toner. Both of these items are mostly plastic, so throwing them away is wasteful. For rewritable compact disk, instead of buying more you can just reformat and reuse old ones. Most offices have drawers full of old disks, used for either archival backups or containing old versions of software. All they need is a new label and a reformatting; this can save your office money and landfill space simultaneously.

4.INK REFILLING

Toner cartridges, both for laser printers and ink jets, can be easily refilled and reused. Several local vendors and national manufacturers will pick up your used cartridges, refill them and sell them for half the price of a new one, and remanufacture them if necessary. A growing number of campus offices are using these recycled cartridges, with excellent results. Further, printer ribbons, for those people with dot matrix printers, can be re-inked for a small price. For more information, call Campus Recycling at 346-1529.

5. E-MAILING AND FAX
Use e-mail as an alternative communication (whether you want it to pass documents to your friends etc.) instead of printing them out. E-mail and fax is efficient and environment friendly because you don't have to write downs bulk mails just to inform others. If you have a fax modem, its even easier to tell your representatives how you feel, either by E-mail or fax. In fact, a fax costs less than a letter! A one page fax takes about a minute to send, which costs about 20 cents for the phone call, while a letter takes 32 cents for the stamp, as well as paper and an envelope. And of course you can do a phone list and fax as many as you like.


6. BE RESOURCEFUL TROUGH UPDATING YOUR PC
In this generation all kinds of changes is translucent. It is easily be spotted everywhere you take your sight changes is there. In field of technologies it is a pretty obvious for changes is just a matter of seconds, the accordance of the transformation is the cosmic amount of waste. Eventually, gadgets are easy be changed depending on what technology trends available in the market. There's a enormous waste in the matter of dumping the older gadget and adapting the newest one. In these situation, people become unreasonable for longing to be accepted by the crowd. It is undeniable.
So you want the latest technology. Your 2400 baud modem isn't fast enough, and your 80 megabyte hard drive is full, and your 386 processor can't run the latest software. In this modern, disposable society, you would normally just throw the old out and get a whole new computer. But we now know that such behavior is wasteful and foolish.
Instead, you can just upgrade your computer or peripherals as necessary. Anyone, and I do mean anyone, can install a new modem or motherboard. It just takes some patience and a good set of instructions. Alternatively, you can have a professional do it for a lot cheaper than a whole new computer.


The mother earth is shouting us to wake us that shes slowly ruin. Everyone can have done something to help the environment in your own simple way by conveying the above tips. This can be applied to us students. Please be vigilant enough by doing something to save energy use by simply practicing this tips. Please be guided and convey this message to all your friends and let us work hand-on-hand solving environmental problem.

Helping mother earth will never be too late if we all will join hand-on-hand working to find solution on the problem and find alternatives to rebirth the earth again. It is not impossible if we believe and with proper and enough assistance. Thus, if people is discipline enough and with concern to the devastating condition of our beloved mother earth destruction would never be happened. But is still it is not late but we have to work it now before it becomes too late and nothing will left to us.

Be aware!!! Do something!!! Join Green Campus Computing!!!!



Visit these sites for more information regarding the topic or article about Green Campus Computing:

http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm
http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=23&Itemid=40
http://www.uoregon.edu/~recycle/Conservation_computing_text.htm


Last edited by Venus Millena on Wed Jul 15, 2009 4:00 pm; edited 3 times in total
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Jan Neil Enanoria Gador

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Wed Jul 15, 2009 3:16 pm

These are some the URL’s that I browsed that talk about “Green Campus Computing”

http://www.dailyutahchronicle.com/news/campus-computing-comes-up-green-1.345643

This site talks about Center works to safety disposal of e-waste. E-wastes or Electronic wastes are those discarded, surplus, obsolete, broken, electrical or electronic devices. These waste cause great health and pollution problem because of the fact that these machines contain serious contaminants that could harm a persons health. In this site, it talks about how a certain organization can address this issue or situation. Andrew Reich, an IT architect was the one who explained the solution to this problem and said that the solutions are simple. In the bigger view, the solution is to have a group or a committee in an organization that will evaluate and check the sustainability of the electronic products in your organization, this way they can evaluate if a certain electronic devices that can still be salvaged and resold and the wastes shall be handled by guaranteed recycle experts so that the wastes can be managed properly, this design is called “Cradle-to-Cradle”. Our university can also adopt this design. The school could come up with a group or committee that would regularly check and evaluate the electronic devices of the school especially in the laboratories. If the devices in the laboratories can still meet the needs of the students then it does not need to be changed and if ever it needs to be replaced or upgraded then the group would know if the old machines can be resold or considered as e-wastes.

http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=23&Itemid=40

PUTTING YOUR COMPUTER TO SLEEP

Saving energy is one way of helping save the ecosystem and one way of saving energy is putting your computer to sleep when you’re not using your computer at the moment but you still working on something. This way the computer consumes less energy because it is in low power mode. When a computer is in low power mode the computer takes less time to wake up when you need to use it again compared to starting up from the “off” state. I believe this practice not hard to implement especially in laboratories in the university. In some cases, classes that are held in the computer laboratories are congested. For example, a class just finished their laboratory class and another class is about to use the laboratories just few minutes after the previous class so it is much better if the students will be asked to put the computers into sleep mode rather than turning it off, this way the university could save energy and lower the light bill.

http://esi.ucsd.edu/esiportal/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=228&Itemid=101

UC San Diego Campus Computing Goes Green- January 28, 2009

This sight talks about sampling of new generations of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable, thus, addressing the problem of soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. One of the devices that could address this problem is called the GreenLight Instrument. This instrument will deploy sensors and software that measure energy consumption, humidity, etc.
The goal is to encourage organizations to come up with strategies that can reduce electricity consumptions. For me, the university can apply strategies without risking costly equipments. It can be done through simple things like replacing AC to DC. One other way is putting schedules that would set the computers to off state when they will not be used so that it wouldn’t consume electricity. There are many ways to address the problem of soaring financial and environment costs. It all depends on how an organization handles it to come up with a solution to the problem.
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Michael George Guanzon

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PostSubject: assigment #4   Fri Jul 17, 2009 9:51 am

Green Campus Computing..


Green energy is the term used to describe sources of energy that are considered to be environmentally friendly and non-polluting, such as geothermal, wind, solar, and hydro.Green energy sources are often considered "green" because they are perceived to lower carbon emissions and create less pollution.

Green energy is commonly thought of in the context of electricity, mechanical power, heating and cogeneration. Consumers, businesses, and organizations may purchase green energy in order to support further development, help reduce the environmental impacts of conventional electricity generation, and increase their nation’s energy independence. Renewable energy certificates (green certificates or green tags) have been one way for consumers and businesses to support green energy.

Energy-Efficient Lighting Tips:

* Use natural daylight when possible.
* If you spend a lot of time working at a computer, consider reducing the overall brightness level in your room to enhance CRT screen visibility.
* Report any lighting problems to your Zone Maintenance office. This might include a burned-out lamp, defective occupancy sensor, or a flickering bulb.
* Turn off the lights in classrooms, offices, and restrooms when the rooms are not being occupied.
* Consider using desk lamps ("task lighting") and reducing overhead lighting in the room.
* If your building has areas where "occupancy sensors" are being used to turn lights on and off (such as in conference rooms, rest rooms, and hallways), please cooperate with their use.
* Replace incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent light bulbs where possible.

Energy Conservation in the Laboratory

* Keep fume hood sashes closed when not in use. Fume hoods operate in a vacuum by drawing room air and any undesirable fumes through the cabinet and exhausting it out the building's exhaust stack. In almost all laboratories on campus, the room air being exhausted is 100% fresh outside air. Fresh air is very expensive to heat or cool. Lowering the sash (the glass window) when the fume hood is not in use reduces the amount of conditioned air exhausted.
* A Bio-Safety cabinet is another type of fume hood; it filters the air rather then exhausting it. This type of fume hood uses a recycling-air vent, which does not necessarily need to be kept on at all times. Remember to turn off the fan when not in use.
* When using running water for cooling or condenser systems, remember to turn off the valve when finished.
* If possible, use a cooling system with a re-circulating pump as opposed to running once through water.
* Turn off all equipment when not in use. This includes everything from hot plates to lights to computers.
* Keep the hallway door shut as much as possible. This is not only a safety measure, but it helps balance the air system in the laboratory.
* When using automatic glassware washers, wait until you have a full load before operating.
* Maintain refrigerators and freezers by keeping coils clean and doors properly sealed.
* If refrigerator or freezer is over 8 years old, consider upgrading to a newer more energy-efficient model.
* Do not place refrigerators or freezers next to room thermostats.
* Consolidate contents of refrigerators or freezers--a full freezer is more efficient to keep cold than a half empty freezer. Turn off the empty, unused appliance.

Energy Efficient Computing

* Do not leave your computer running overnight and on weekends. Also, wait until you are ready to use it before you turn it on.
* A modest amount of turning on and off will not harm the computer or monitor. The life of a monitor is related to the amount of time it is in use, not the number of on and off cycles.
* Try to plan your computer-related activities so you can do them all at once, keeping the computer off at other times.
* Do not turn on the printer until you are ready to print. Printers consume energy even while they are idling.
* Do not print out copies of email unless necessary.
* If you spend a large amount of time at your computer, consider reducing the light level in your office. This may improve CRT (cathode ray tube) screen visibility as well as save energy.
* Most computer equipment now comes with power management features. If your computer has these features, make sure they are activated.
* The best screen saver is no screen saver at all - turn off your monitor when you are not using it. This option is second best only to turning off your computer all together.
* Use "paperless" methods of communication such as email and fax-modems.
* When typing documents, especially drafts, use a smaller font and decrease the spacing between lines, or reformat to keep your document to as few pages as possible, especially when typing drafts.
* Review your document on the screen instead of printing a draft. If you must print a draft, use the blank back side of used paper.
* Use a printer that can print double-sided documents. When making copies, use double-sided copying.
* Always buy and use recycled-content paper. Look for papers with 50-100% post-consumer waste and non-chlorine bleached. Also, recycle your paper when done.
* Buy a monitor only as large as you really need. Although a large monitor might seem more attractive, you should remember that a 17-inch monitor uses 40 percent more energy than a 14-inch monitor. Also, the higher the resolution, the more energy it needs.
* Ink-jet printers, though a little slower than laser printers, use 80 to 90 percent less energy.
* Request recycled/recyclable packaging from your computer vendor.
* Buy vegetable (or non-petroleum-based) inks. These printer inks are made from renewable resources; require fewer hazardous solvents; and in many cases produce brighter, cleaner colors.

How the university can adopt this concept?

Our university can simply adopt green campus computing by simply educating the students about what is "green campus computing" and the benefits it brings to us. Our university should implement policies and regulations in conserving energy, and do orientations about the right ways of using personal computers and any other related devices. And lastly, take good care of our environment. In this simple way, we can conserve energy.





References:

http://www.energymanagement.umich.edu/utilities/energy_management/computing/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_energy
http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html



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emilio jopia jr.



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PostSubject: Asssignment 4: Green Copmputing   Fri Jul 17, 2009 11:04 am

Green Computing Guide

The growing use of computers on campus has caused a dramatic increase in energy consumption, putting negative pressure on CU’s budget and the environment. Each year more and more computers are purchased and put to use, but it’s not just the number of computers that is driving energy consumption upward. The way that we use computers also adds to the increasing energy burden.

Research reveals that most personal desktop computers are not being used the majority of the time they are running and many personal computers nationwide are needlessly left on continuously. Every time we leave computers or lights on we waste electricity. Burning fossil fuels generates most of our electricity and it also emits pollutants, sulfur, and carbon dioxide into the air. These emissions can cause respiratory disease, smog, acid rain and global climate change.

Energy Efficient Computing

Some tested suggestions that may make it possible for you to reduce your computer energy consumption by 80 percent or more while still retaining most or all productivity and other benefits of your computer system, including network connectivity.

http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm



Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money

Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.
Those were a few of the ideas discussed last week at a conference, "Greening the Internet Economy," that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event, held by the University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.
Many of the participants emphasized the importance of systems that could more intelligently measure energy use on the campus. In recent years, colleges have been hurt by the rising costs of powering and cooling their data centers, in part because those costs are difficult to measure and poorly understood (The Chronicle, January 9).
At San Diego, researchers have started work on hardware to help colleges and other organizations understand how to make their servers more efficient. The device, called the GreenLight Instrument, will deploy sensors and software to measure the energy use, humidity, and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Data Center, a popular, self-contained complex of servers.
The goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption, said Thomas A. DeFanti, principal investigator on the project and a senior research strategist at the university's California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology.

http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html


Seeing Green
Adelphi University finds seven ways to save power.

http://www.edtechmag.com/higher/september-october-2007/seeing-green.html


How the university can adopt this concept?


By simply following the the green computing practices like reducing the amount that you print, turning off your computer and monitor when not in use, as well as using sleep and hibernate modes when your computer is on. When it's time to buy a computer, consider a notebook or small-size desktop. These use less electricity than traditional desktops.In this way, we can contribute to reduce the use of hazardous materials, maximize energy efficiency during the product's lifetime, and promote recyclability or biodegradability of defunct products and factory waste.
This is not a quick fix that can happen overnight. You can implement this one step at a time.
Every little step you take makes a difference.
These include
Green Computing is not just about saving the environment; it is about saving money and creating the most efficient data center possible. The rest falls into place and you are also impacting the world we live in for the next generation.
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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Fri Jul 17, 2009 6:38 pm



The three URLs that talks about Green Campus Computing:

http://inews.berkeley.edu/articles/Spring2009/green-computing
http://www.environmentalleader.com/2008/12/02/u-m-hopes-green-computing-will-cut-costs-emissions/
http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm?utm_source=at&utm_medium=en

Green Campus Computing is the practice of using computing devices efficiently and in an environmentally friendly way. The commonly used computing device is a computer. We, students, use computers whether for fun or study purposes; especially as an IT student, we work with it every now and then. In fact, when I go to our virtual library or to NODAL I see a lot of students waiting for a computer unit to be vacated. And I have noticed nowadays that more and more students have their laptops. This situation only shows that most of the students, if not all, are using computers on day to day basis.

In my point of view, the very first step for our university to adopt the concept of Green Campus Computing or for the students to practice Green Computing is to conduct a symposium about Green Campus Computing. If not all students will be able to attend the symposium then giving in flyers and putting posters are the possible solution to inform students about Green Campus Computing. Some of the non-computing courses in our university also have their computer fundamentals subject and it would be a good thing if Green Campus Computing will be a part of the Instructors Course Outline.

While the students are being educated about Green Computing our university should also:
Arrow Supply computers directly with local DC power
Arrow Installing more solar panels
Arrow Direct cool air only where the facility is generating the most heat

Computers generally use direct current, but the public electricity grid typically supplies alternating current, and 30 percent of the electricity can be lost in the conversion of one form to the other. Some US colleges have started projects to power their computers directly from solar cells or other sources of DC power on the campus, avoiding the energy loss altogether.

Our university may also launch a "green computing" educational campaign; recognizing and rewarding individuals who conserve energy; adopting campuswide purchasing guidelines for computing equipment.

Since I am already aware about Green Computing I am now practicing it. I turned off my screensaver so it will just be in standby mode or sleep mode, I even turn it off if I think that it will take me a long time before using it again. An active PC uses between 60 to 90 watts, while a sleeping PC uses 2 to 3. When I plug in a peripheral (such as USB’s) in my laptop after I have done copying or saving something into it I immediately safely remove it to save the battery’s life. I also lessen the brightness on my laptop during daylight to save the battery’s life.

Let us all support and practice Green Campus Computing! Razz
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Sarah Jean Tisara

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Sun Jul 19, 2009 11:21 pm

Idea What is Green campus computing? In my own understanding, it is a widely promoted campaign on saving the environment from technology’s fast evolution and reducing the power consumption of computers. There are articles over the Internet that discuss about green campus computing and some of the best solutions to apply this said campaign. Currently, several Universities and Colleges are putting into practice these possible ways. Does University of Southeastern Philippines can also achieve green campus computing?

Arrow http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm

This article talks about the conference held by University of California at San Diego. “Greening the Internet Economy” is the aim of the conference. The event, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments more competent. Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves were some of the ideas discussed in the conference. They introduced a device called the Green Light Instrument. This device will deploy sensors and software to measure the energy use, humidity, and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Data Center, a popular, self-contained complex of servers. Its goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption.

If our school will adopt these things, it will be a great help to the environment. But I don’t think if our school can afford this kind of technology. One best alternative for this is to supply energy from solar cells or other sources of DC power. In this way, the school can save on electricity bills.


Arrow http://www.theorion.com/2.691/green-campus-pushes-energy-saving-program-1.3253

It talks about a computer program that would save energy and reduce greenhouse emmissions. Power Save is the computer program created by the software company Faronics. It put computers into a low energy consuming stand-by mode and it measures how much energy is being used and saved. The said program will be installed on each computer and it reports back to a central-control server that synchronizes the whole Power Save setting process and makes it a lot easier than setting one computer at a time.

If Power Save will be implemented in USEP, the school’s emission will be reduced and of course it can save its budget on energy. But before implementing this kind of program, the teachers, staff and also the students should be oriented about it. The university can benefit from this program as well as the environment.


Arrow http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=23&Itemid=40

This article is about putting your computer to sleep and how it can save energy and help the environment. When your computer is in sleep, it is on low power mode and it will be easy to wake up whenever you want to use your computer again. To make sure that you consume less energy, you can set your computer to automatically sleep when not in use in a specified amount of time.

If the university will apply this strategy, energy consumption will be reduced and it can lessen environmental concerns. The computers, especially on laboratories and in the library should be maintained and set a specific time to sleep when not in use. It is also better to use CRT monitors and CPUs, for it consume less energy. The management may also consider thin client computing or using more environmentally friendly consumer packaging models. These strategies will not only save the school from power consumption, but it will also provide great experience for students and staff.


Idea The dramatic increase in energy consumption and costs has caused a renewed interest in the effective management and use of computing throughout the campus. Every time we leave computers on without regard for energy conservation and planned use, we potentially waste electricity, which means wasting money and polluting the environment. But there several ways on preventing this, let's all support green campus computing.
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PostSubject: GREEN CAMPUS COMPUTING   Mon Jul 20, 2009 5:17 pm



"GREEN CAMPUS COMPUTING"


I break this phrase ‘green campus computing’ into three to find out what its meaning literally..^_^
‘What is green?’ ‘What is Campus?’ ‘What is computing?
What is Green?
- Produced in an environment and ecologically friendly way by using renewable resources or a color in the spectrum between yellow and blue..^_^ (whehehehe..)
What is Campus?
– an area of the land that contains the main buildings and grounds of a university, college, or school.
What is computing?
– the activity of developing and using computer technology, including computer hardware and software.

Microsoft® Encarta® 2009. © 1993-2008 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Does it mean like this? The spectrum between yellow and blue in an area of the land that contains the main buildings and grounds of a university, college, or school with the activity of developing and using computer technology, including computer hardware and software. (confusing..)
Or this…:
An ecologically friendly way of using the computer technology in campuses on the environment. (right!) ^_^
We, IT students who are commonly using computers can’t deny the fact that this devices and equipments were so helpful to us because of its reliability and uses that can satisfy us. Using laptops, computers, storing devices is very valuable in storing files, making an assignment/project, class discussion, acquiring information, etc. But we should consciously aware on its effect. There are ways on how to use computers appropriately, how we save and proper waste management of it.


How Much Energy Does Your Computer System Use?
Question Question
A typical desktop PC system is comprised of the computer itself (the CPU or the “box”), a monitor, and printer. Your CPU may require approximately 100 watts of electrical power. Add 50-150 watts for a 15-17 inch monitor, proportionately more for larger monitors. The power requirements of conventional laser printers can be as much as 100 watts or more when printing though much less if idling in a “sleep mode.” Ink jet printers use as little as 12 watts while printing and 5 watts while idling.

Energy Efficient Computing


Here are some tested suggestions that may make it possible for you to reduce your computer energy consumption by 80 percent or more while still retaining most or all productivity and other benefits of your computer system, including network connectivity.

  • Screen savers save no energy
    If screen saver images appear on your monitor for more than 5 minutes, you are wasting energy! Screen saver programs may save the phosphors in your monitor screen, but this is not really a concern with newer monitors, especially LCD screens. And they do not save any energy.


  • * Turn off your computer and/or peripherals when they are not in use. Turning on and off will not harm the equipment.
    * Don’t run computers continuously unless they are in use continuously.
    * Turn off at night and on weekends
    * Look for ways to reduce the amount of time your computer is on without adversely affecting your productivity.
  • Unless you require immediate access to e-mail or other Internet
    services, break the habit of turning on all your computer equipment
    as
    soon as you enter the
    office each day.
  • If practical, informally group your computer activities and
    try to do then during
    one or two parts of the day, leaving the computer off at
    other times.
  • Avoid using the switch on a powerstrip to turn on all your
    equipment.
  • If you use a laser printer, don’t turn your printer
    on until you are ready to print.
  • Turn off your entire computer system
    (CPU, monitor and printer) or at
    least your monitor and printer when you go to lunch or
    will be out of office for a meeting
    or an errand.
  • For “computer servers” which
    must be on to serve network functions, explore ways to turn
    servers off at night.


http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html
http://campustechnology.com/articles/2006/08/where-green-and-it-meet.aspx
http://www.brighthub.com/environment/green-computing/articles/14645.aspx
Like a Star @ heaven here's my blog: Sleep Sleep Sleep
CLICK HERE


Last edited by Tanya Clarissa G. Amancio on Wed Aug 05, 2009 1:35 am; edited 5 times in total
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Roy Cuevas

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PostSubject: Assignment 4   Mon Jul 20, 2009 5:55 pm

These are some of the links that I searched in connection with Green Campus Computing.

http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogsection&id=7&Itemid=39

The content of this particular link talks about setting the computer in “Sleep” mode when you are not using it. It takes less time for the computer to start up from sleep than it does after it has been turned off. If the computer is in “sleep mode”, it is turned on, but it is in a low-energy consumption mode.

Also in this link are tips on how to reduce your energy usage.
1. Use Energy Star Products.
2. Replace Incandescent light bulbs with Compact Flourescent Lamps (CFL's).
3. Turn lights off when you're not in the room/classroom.
4. Use half the lights when possible
5. Use natural light when possible.
6. Take the stairs instead of the elevator.
7. Turn off computer's during the night.
8. Use your computers "Stand-by" mode instead of screen savers.
9. Plug Appliances that have phantom loads (anything that basically needs a remote or needs charging) into a surge protector and switch it off when appliances are not in use.
10. Unplug Cell Phone Chargers when you're not charging your cell phone.
11. Reduce the number of refrigerators in use by sharing refrigerators.
12. Avoid leaving the refrigerator or freezer doors open.
13. Remember to turn off the oven and stove tops
14. Turn off curling and straightening irons and unplug hair dryers.
15. Do laundry during off peak hours (after about 6 pm).

Although here, I think the ones concerned with green campus computing are numbers 1,8, First off, we go to number one.

Number one talks about the use of Energy Star Products. Computers which have an indication that they are Energy Star Products are considered to be computers that are environment-friendly and consume less power. Just like in the computer at home, when you it starts up, there is an “Energy Star” logo that pops out. That means it’s an Energy Star Product.

Number 8 talks about putting your computers in “Stand-by mode” instead of screen savers. This is a good way to save energy, because some screen savers are very flashy and have high graphics and some animation. If it uses too much of the computer, then that means it also consumes more energy, while if you put it on stand-by mode, the monitor only shows black, nothing else. You save more energy if you do it that way.

http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm

This link talks about a conference entitled “Greening the Internet Economy”, which was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. Here are some of the ideas that were presented there that involved Green Campus Computing.

• Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator
• Replace AC power with DC power
• Cool the servers only where they get the hottest
• Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves

Also it talked about a device called the Greenlight Instrument, which will deploy sensors and software to measure the energy use, humidity, and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Data Center, a popular, self-contained complex of servers.
This instrument could greatly help the cause of Green Campus Computing, because you are able to see if you are using too much energy or not, and you are able to monitor other factors that may affect the energy consumption of your equipment in your company or facility. And it can let engineers determine how to use energy more precisely. They can determine what area of the facility generates more heat, so they can cool it. And they wouldn’t just cool the area because of standard procedure, they would just only cool it if the readings say that it is generating too much heat.
And they were talking about replacing AC(alternating current) power with DC(direct current). Computers generally use direct current, but the public electricity grid typically supplies alternating current, and 30 percent of the electricity can be lost in the conversion of one form to the other. This is such a waste of energy, so they tried ways on just using direct current in schools and universities, like getting their power directly from solar cells or other sources of DC power on the campus.
Placing campus data centers beside renewable sources of power like power plants definitely will save energy. Only high speed optical transmission lines are needed to connect them.

http://www.dailyutahchronicle.com/news/campus-computing-comes-up-green-1.345643


This link here talks about The University of Utah’s (also called as “The U”) problems with their e-waste(electronic waste). They have problems on their electronic waste management, so they are finding ways to to solve these issues. Currently, e-waste generated at the U is processed via the university surplus and salvage department. This department separates anything that still has "utility" from true waste. Usable items are resold, while waste is handled by Guaranteed Recycling Xperts, a company that contracts with the state and local schools to process this e-waste in an environmentally responsible manner.
This style of dealing with e-waste would be good for schools, because it could save space for trash and it could also generate income for the school. And also, students could find alternatives for finding equipment.
Green Campus Computing really I think has no disadvantages, because its goals are for the environment. Finding ways for saving energy, making less out of e-waste, and many more. I think these goals don’t mean any harm to any people. I salute Green Campus Computing.
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PostSubject: Green Campus Computing   Tue Jul 21, 2009 2:27 pm

1. Computing Goes Green on Campus

Task force aims to reduce environmental impact

BY ANDREW VOWLES

An article from uoguelph.ca website that promotes green campus computing.
They introduce new energy conservation strategies and new environmentally friendly
computer purchasing policy. Besides saving energy, the task force expects its efforts
will help in reducing greenhouse gas emissions associated with campus computing.

*Awareness campaign. Focus groups will look at awareness of energy use and conservation
in computing and potential barriers to green computing. The campaign will offer ideas to students,
faculty and staff on basic computing practices, from reminders about turning off monitors to use
of power-saving features and settings.

*Energy conservation strategies. A survey in January of information technology managers
across campus yielded information about current power-management practices among computer
users. That information will be used to develop standard practices and power-consumption settings
designed to save energy. Those procedures, involving University IT staff and Physical Resources,
are expected to be ready for implementation by spring.

http://www.uoguelph.ca/atguelph/07-02-14/newscomputing.shtml

2. Green Computing and Higher Education

This program promotes the new 3 Rs.
Reduce your carbon footprint, Reuse and Recycle.

Many campuses are looking to CIOs to conserve energy and to
promote more sustainable solutions in labs and data centers.

http://ready2net.csumb.edu/site/x21966.xml

3. GREEN COMPUTING

Personal Computers are one of the fastest going electricity loads in business and academic area.

How can the campus adopt the concept of green campus computing?
This site contains waste minimization procedure that campuses could follow.
*Like electrical conservation tips
*Paper conservation tips
*Purchasing and use of equipment tips.

http://www.p2000.umich.edu/energy_conservation/ec7.htm
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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Sat Jul 25, 2009 7:23 pm

GREEN COMPUTING
The increase in U-M consumption of electricity and paper causes an increase in air pollution, solid waste, and the burning of fossil fuels. Much of the paper used by PCs is wasted. National estimates indicate that most PCs are not being used most of the time they are on. In addition, 30 - 40 percent of all PCs are left on overnight and on weekends.
On the U-M Ann Arbor campus, PC operation alone may account for at least $1.8 million in energy costs each year. This represents approximately 11 percent of the total amount spent by the U-M on electricity. It is estimated that a PC system can easily consume 300 watts of electricity per hour ‚ the same amount of energy needed to operate three 100 watt light bulbs.
The following "green computing" habits can significantly reduce the amount of electricity and environmental waste for which PCs are responsible.
Waste Minimization Procedure

Electrical Conservation Tips:
Turn the computer off overnight and on weekends;
Wait until ready to use the PC before turning it on;
If the computer is going to be inactive for more than 16 minutes, consider turning it off. After this time, the energy needed to run the computer outweighs the start-up energy;
Do not turn on the printer until ready to print, even an idle printer consumes energy;
Try to schedule computer-related activities to do them all at once, keeping the computer off at other times;
If spending a large amount of time at the computer, consider reducing the light level in your office. This may improve cathode ray tube screen visibility as well as save energy.
Paper Conservation Tips:
Use "paperless" methods of communication such as electronic mail (e-mail) and fax modems. Also, do not print out copies of e-mail messages unless necessary;
Use smaller font sizes and decrease the spacing between lines, or reformat to keep the document to as few pages as possible;
Review documents on the screen instead of printing a draft. If you must print a draft, use the blank back side of used sheets;
Use a printer that can print double-sided documents. When making copies, use double-sided copying;
The U-M buys and uses recycled-content paper when possible. Look for papers with 50 - 100 percent post-consumer waste and non-chlorine bleached. Also, recycle paper when done.
Store information on diskettes rather than in "hard copy" format. A single high-density 3.5 inch floppy disk can hold the equivalent of 750 sheets of paper, about one and a half reams. Also, be sure to reuse disks that contain outdated information.
Purchasing and Use of Equipment:
Printer toner cartridges can be refilled, rebuilt and reused. Many manufacturers will take a spent cartridge, refurbish it, refill it, and return it for about half the price of buying a new one;
Determine whether you can upgrade your existing equipment rather than purchasing new equipment;
Donate an old computer to a school or charity; if it is permanently out of order, give it to a computer recycling facility instead of discarding in a landfill;
Only buy a monitor as large as you really need; a 17 inch monitor uses 40 percent more energy than a 14-inch monitor. Also, the higher the resolution, the more energy it needs;
Consider purchasing an ink jet printer instead of a laser printer. Although they are a little slower, they use 80-90 percent less energy;
Request recycled or recyclable packaging from your vendor;
Buy soy or non-petroleum based inks. These printer inks are made from renewable resources, require fewer hazardous solvents, which translates to fewer air emissions, and in many cases produce brighter, cleaner colors;
Try to buy energy efficient products such as those bearing the Energy Star Logo. The Energy Star Program was started by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to encourage the production and use of energy-efficient equipment. In accordance with the EPA's voluntary guidelines, leading computer manufacturers are now producing equipment that can automatically power down to a "sleep mode" to save energy when not in use. They also use up to 30 percent less energy when running than conventional equipment. These added capabilities do not increase price or decrease performance.

Benefits
The production of electricity is the largest single source of air pollution, due to the burning of fossil fuels. A power plant used to generate electricity, burns oil, coal, or natural gas that emits gases such as carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. These gases, in turn, cause acid rain, smog and global warming. Conserving energy reduces the amount of fuel that has to be consumed, thereby reducing the amount of pollution generated. Obviously, energy-efficiency is a positive step toward reducing air pollution.
Some of the tips given above to reduce paper use and reuse of toner cartridge and diskettes will go a long way towards reducing the amount of solid waste that ultimately ends up in a landfill.
http://www.p2000.umich.edu/energy_conservation/ec7.htm






GreenVM - not only saving energy resources but human resources as well:
Craig Terrell, head of the GreenVM project (also a part of Enterprise Systems and Technical Services), like Tracy Hansen sums up his team's project nicely with an eye towards its environmentally-friendly potential: "The UNT GreenVM project aims to consolidate server resources and hardware costs into a centralized location. This means that the hardware is being used to its available capacity instead of wasting cooling and electricity as the majority of servers do. With our existing VM infrastructure, we can run between 25 to 60 virtual servers (Web, Application, File & Print, etc.) on each physical server. This method also allows us more efficient use of storage resources by utilizing a SAN (Storage Area Network) which shares a large array of drives across multiple servers."
Terrell further explains some of the technical aspects and advantages of his project: "All the virtual servers are running on clustered physical servers. If we do suffer a hardware failure, the virtual servers automatically move to another physical server with minimal down time, typically under 2 minutes or less. If we receive notification of a looming failure we can migrate the servers with zero downtime. There is no worry about setting up or maintaining any hardware. No AC issues, no power issues, no hardware failure or associated parts issues. A VM behaves like a physical server but boots much faster. You retain all control over it, just as you would if you owned the hardware, but without the hardware headaches. That does mean you will be having to patch and backup the virtual server just as you would a physical server. Physical servers can be migrated onto a virtual server, a process called P2V. This is useful if there are existing server hardware issues or the need to retire an older server without the expense of new hardware." So like many green technologies, not only are virtual servers a way to stay green but they also offer overall workflow and efficiency advantages as well.
The GreenVM project has helped the distributed computing areas on campus in freeing up many of their technical and personnel resources to concentrate on direct desktop and user services. With server management not so much a part of their jobs, staff members can really hone in on their already fine customer service. Terrell reports that over 70 VM's are in production for departments such as Facilities, Student Development, the College of Music and TAMS as well as several CITC internal projects. Terrell cites future plans and advantages as well: "The CITC VM systems are available to all departments within UNT with a nominal cost. It is typically less expensive than purchasing a server over a three-year period with the added benefits of high-availability and easier management. In order to maximize the benefit of a virtual environment, the plan is to migrate or launch new projects in VM whenever possible. The more we move to VM, the less cooling and electricity we need per server." In addition, his team is implementing full offsite DR (Disaster recovery) for major systems and projects.

http://www.unt.edu/benchmarks/archives/2009/april09/Greencomputing.htm



What is Green Computing?

Green computing is the environmentally responsible use of technology.

What can I do to “green” my technology use?
Enable power management on your computer.
Power down the computer and monitor when not in use.
Consider plugging your computer and peripherals into a power strip with an on/off switch and turn the entire power strip off when not in use.
Think before you print. Do you really need a paper copy?
Use recycled paper if possible
Use Print Preview to review your job before printing it
Print in black and white whenever possible.
Print two-sided whenever possible.
Reuse unnecessary print jobs as scratch paper.
Advertise events, parties, etc. electronically or with chalk instead of print-outs.
Recycle!
Use the recycling bins around campus to recycle paper, glass, aluminum, and plastic
Toner on campus can be brought to ISR for recycling
Beloit College computers and laptop batteries can be brought to ISR for recycling
Locations for recycling home computers can be found here
Recycle used alkaline batteries in Pearsons by the mail center or in the Library
Use email instead of faxes
If you are in the market for a new computer at home, consider buying an Energy Star compliant computer
If it’s possible, download software from the web instead of purchasing a physical installation disc

What is Power management and how does it help?

Every day energy is wasted by computers and monitors that are left on when not in use. By simply putting the hard drive and monitor to sleep after a short period of inactivity, huge energy savings can be realized. The computer should wake up with a quick click of the mouse or by pressing a key on the keyboard. In some cases, you will need to press the power button briefly to wake the computer up. Also, be sure to shut down your computer before leaving for the day and over weekends. Use this handy calculator to get an idea of how much energy and money can be saved.
Some Myths and Facts about Power Management*
Myth: Computers have a shorter life when you turn them on and off frequently.
Fact: Hard disks in PCs older than 10 years did not automatically park their heads when shut off, leading to disk damage from frequent on/off power cycling. Newer PCs are designed to handle over 40,000 on/off cycles.
Myth: Turning your computer off uses more energy than leaving it on.
Fact: The surge of power when a computer is turned off lasts a few seconds and is insignificant compared to the sustained energy used in keeping it on during periods of inactivity.
Myth: As long as the computer is off, it’s not using any power.
Fact: As long as they are plugged in, your computer and other electronic devices continue to use electricity – even when they are turned off or in standby mode. A computer uses up to 10 watts when it is turned off but still plugged in.
http://www.beloit.edu/isr/greencomputing.php

For more information about green computing, check out these sites:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_computing
http://www.climatesaverscomputing.org
http://www.energymanagement.umich.edu/utilities/energy_management/computing/
http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html
http://www.uwf.edu/helpdesk/eco/

We all know that not all people in this university have knowledge about the “green campus computing”. So, for me, the first thing to do for the University to apply these concepts about is to aware and educate the people about this. They should conduct some seminars or symposiums for the students or even the faculties to further understand this concept so that it will not be very difficult for the implementation.
Second, when the people are already aware, properly educated, and sensitive enough with regard to this matter including the causes and effects, this way they will think more before doing anything. Even this kind of action can lead to a nicer and greener environment.
To sum it up, it is not enough with the total awareness of the people, but, more importantly on the participation of the people. Not only the students, faculties, or the administration should participate but all the people that are part of the university.
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basith_jumat

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Thu Jul 30, 2009 7:13 pm

1. http://www.theorion.com/2.691/green-campus-pushes-energy-saving-program-1.3253

They are implementing A simple computer program could save Chico State thousands of dollars, save on energy and reduce greenhouse emissions.

2. http://www.clemson.edu/studentaffairs/housing/living_green/index.php


Its mission is to promote a “green” campus by coordinating and sponsoring events that further Clemson’s commitment to the environment and sustainability. The goals of Solid Green are to raise awareness of littering on campus, recycling, energy and water conservation and other environmental issues; to promote clean-up activities and other events; and to support student groups that promote environmental awareness.

Teaching and Research

* Strengthen and prioritize undergraduate, graduate, and post-grad environmental studies, research, and policy programs.
* Teach environmental literacy to all students.
* Expand opportunities for using the campus physical plant and business operations as a “learning lab” for students.
* Develop community environmental education programs and participate in public dialogue on environmental issues in the wider community

3. http://ssi.ucsd.edu/esiportal/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=228&Itemid=101


Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.

Those were a few of the ideas discussed last week at a conference, "Greening the Internet Economy," that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event, held by the University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.


Regarding for the URL number 1. Saving an energy using an application software it is good for the university because we are implementing to save energy. this Software can reduce your monthly bill for electricity, but it must be that in every department must used this software. It's amazing right therefore our problem as a student for using or switching our laptop are being resolve.. Right? u just install the software in your laptop and you can't give a big charge for the university electricity charge.. for the URL number 2, As i observe a lot of student here in the university are using the outside source for their studies, which is to expensive specially to the less fortunate student who don't even know where to get their allowance for the next day or week..Why we don't expand opportunities to the students to used the campus for learning activities. University must use our campus for our focus of studies if our topic can be found inside the campus to save money or to consider the other students right. For the URL number 3, we must Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator, it is really cool right we can save more energy. The university must do this for a better way on how to implement green campus computing in USEP. Because if we implement all of this, not only the administration can get the benefits but also the student in the university can get a lot of benefits from using the electricity to conducting a proper studies. this all i can suggest!!!


hehehe!!!!
afro


Last edited by basith_jumat on Sun Aug 02, 2009 5:10 pm; edited 3 times in total
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Anthony Rigor Aguilar

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PostSubject: Assignment 4: Green Campus Computing   Sat Aug 01, 2009 1:34 am

1._ http://www.it.utah.edu/leadership/green/basics.html
Green Computing Best Practices for End Users
On this site they discussed much more on paper waste in their work areas. I found this tips very interesting since most of us students sometimes forget to clean after using the area.
Office Computer-Generated Waste
Important steps toward green computing include modifying paper and toner use, disposal of old computer equipment and purchasing decisions when considering new computer equipment.
Paper Waste
• Print as little as possible. Review and modify documents on the screen and use print preview. Minimize the number of hard copies and paper drafts you make. Instead of printing, save information to disks, or USB memory sticks.
• Recycle waste paper, have a recycle bin at each community printer and copier location.
• Buy and use recycled paper in your printers and copiers. From an environmental point of view, the best recycled paper is 100 percent post-consumer recycled content.
• Save e-mail whenever possible and avoid needless printing of e-mail messages.
• Use e-mail instead of faxes or send faxes directly from your computer to eliminate the need for a hard copy. When you must fax using hard copies, save paper using a "sticky" fax address note and not a cover sheet.
• On larger documents, use smaller font sizes (consistent with readability) to save paper.
• If your printer prints a test page whenever it is turned on, disable this unnecessary feature.
• Before recycling paper, which has print on only one side, set it aside for use as scrap paper or for printing drafts.
• When documents are printed or copied, use double-sided printing and copying. If possible, use the multiple pages per sheet option on printer properties.
• When general information-type documents must be shared within an office, try circulating them instead of making an individual copy for each person. Even better, make the document electronically available to the audience and display it on a projector.
Electronic Waste
• Use the campus network where possible to transfer files. This avoids the need to write CDs or DVDs or use floppy diskettes.
• Use USB memory sticks instead of CDs, DVDs, or floppies.
• Use re-writable CDs and DVDs.
• There are hopes of the University Recycling program addressing e-waste in the near future

2._http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogsection&id=7&Itemid=39

PUTTING YOUR COMPUTER TO SLEEP

This site talks more about on conserving the electric energy you have used. This suggests using the computer practically and properly. I can relate to this site because the message is simple; when using your computer and other electrical devices try using the them with minimal power management.

When you're not using your computer, you can save energy by putting it to "sleep." When your computer is in sleep, it's turned on but in a low power mode. It takes less time for a computer to wake up from sleep than it does for the computer to start up after being turned off.

You can put your computer to sleep right away by choosing Apple menu > Sleep. You can also choose to put the computer to sleep automatically when your computer has been inactive for a specified amount of time. You can also set only the display to sleep. If your computer is in the middle of a task that you want to let finish while you are away (for example, burning a DVD), you should set only the display to sleep.

Green Tips for everyone

1. Use Energy Star Products.
2. Replace Incandescent light bulbs with Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFL's).
3. Turn lights off when you're not in the room/classroom.
4. Use half the lights when possible
5. Use natural light when possible.
6. Take the stairs instead of the elevator.
7. Turn off computer's during the night.
8. Use your computers "Stand-by" mode instead of screen savers.
9. Plug Appliances that have phantom loads (anything that basically needs a remote or needs charging) into a surge protector and switch it off when appliances are not in use.
10. Unplug Cell Phone Chargers when you're not charging your cell phone.
11. Reduce the number of refrigerators in use by sharing refrigerators.
12. Avoid leaving the refrigerator or freezer doors open.
13. Remember to turn off the oven and stove tops
14. Turn off curling and straightening irons and unplug hair dryers.
15. Do laundry during off peak hours (after about 6 pm).


3._ http://etcjournal.wordpress.com/2009/07/21/green-computing/ also http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/greenit/desktop.xml

Sustainable Desktop Computing

This last site talks much more on planning ahead the things needed to analyze. Planning to conserve is an ideal way to reduce cost and efficiency along the way.

To achieve a sustained reduction in energy consumption associated with desktop computers we recommend groups across the collegiate university to work through these five steps:

Step 1: Estimate. First estimate how much electricity your desktop computing infrastructure will consume if computers are (a) left on all the time or (b) switched off at the end of the day.

Step 2: Research. Many groups within the university and around the world have implemented projects to reduce IT-related greenhouse gas emissions and costs. OUCS is working with these groups to write up a variety of approaches in the form of case studies.

Step 3: Implement. There are many tools you can implement to reduce IT-related electricity consumption. How you achieve this within your group will depend on the needs and skills of your users, and the hardware and software infrastructure you own.

Step 4: Communicate. You will need to encourage as many people as possible to “do their bit.” Behavioural change is likely to be a significant and critical part of any initiative that aims to improve environmental performance.

Step 5: Share. In step two we suggest you read about the work of other groups. In this last step we encourage you to share your experiences by documenting your approach in the form of a case study.

In our campus at USEP we can also perform these green tips in many ways. We must take our initiative especially and during the laboratory hours by using the computer equipments in a proper manner by turning only one pc at a time, use the computer device a as computing device and not an entertainment device, if necessary use the device on a prescribe schedule, use only USB drive as necessary, never use or install an application device that may cause instability to its system especially without the permission. In using computer equipments, avoid habits that may cause damage to the computer device such as improper or abusive use of its parts such as keyboards, mouse, monitors, and etc. If the device is not working well, tell the instructor and use any vacant device. After using the device, be sure to leave the computer laboratory clean by placing the things used during the exercise in proper order, turn-off the computer device properly and unplug it if possible and remember to check the lights off, the desk and the floors for any visible papers and other garbage. It’s up to us on how we can adopt these tips for the benefit of everyone.
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March Dawn Eder

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Mon Aug 10, 2009 4:18 pm

Green Tips for Everyone

http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=19&Itemid=40


1. Use Energy Star Products.
2. Replace Incandescent light bulbs with Compact Flourescent Lamps (CFL's).
3. Turn lights off when you're not in the room/classroom.
- Naturally you should turn it off because no one is using the room for it would just consume and waste energy.
4. Use half the lights when possible
5. Use natural light when possible.
6. Take the stairs instead of the elevator.
7. Turn off computer's during the night.
8. Use your computers "Stand-by" mode instead of screen savers.
9. Plug Appliances that have phantom loads (anything that basically needs a remote or needs charging) into a surge protector and switch it off when appliances are not in use.
10. Unplug Cell Phone Chargers when you're not charging your cell phone.
11. Reduce the number of refrigerators in use by sharing refrigerators.
12. Avoid leaving the refrigerator or freezer doors open.
13. Remember to turn off the oven and stove tops
14. Turn off curling and straightening irons and unplug hair dryers.
15. Do laundry during off peak hours (after about 6 pm).

These tips could be use and can be adopted by the university. Some maybe but not all because this talk also have tips to be made at home which cannot be adopted in the university.

Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money
By JOSH KELLER
http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm


Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.
Those were a few of the ideas discussed last week at a conference, "Greening the Internet Economy," that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event, held by the University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.
Many of the participants emphasized the importance of systems that could more intelligently measure energy use on the campus. In recent years, colleges have been hurt by the rising costs of powering and cooling their data centers, in part because those costs are difficult to measure and poorly understood (The Chronicle, January 9).
At San Diego, researchers have started work on hardware to help colleges and other organizations understand how to make their servers more efficient. The device, called the GreenLight Instrument, will deploy sensors and software to measure the energy use, humidity, and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Data Center, a popular, self-contained complex of servers.
The goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption, said Thomas A. DeFanti, principal investigator on the project and a senior research strategist at the university's California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology.
"Right now there isn't enough information for somebody to make a definitive decision: Where do I save my money? Do I eliminate disks in my computers, or do I stop them? Do I use more RAM or less RAM?" said Mr. DeFanti. "Nobody has detailed information on this."
Aiming for Precision
Intelligent measuring systems like Greenlight should be extended to allow engineers to more precisely determine how to use energy, said Gary L. Baldwin, director of special projects at the University of California's Citris program. For example, he said, operators at a data center could direct cool air only where the facility is generating the most heat.
Another idea that shows promise, participants said, is to supply computers directly with local DC power. Computers generally use direct current, but the public electricity grid typically supplies alternating current, and 30 percent of the electricity can be lost in the conversion of one form to the other.
Some colleges have started projects to power their computers directly from solar cells or other sources of DC power on the campus, avoiding the energy loss altogether. At San Diego, administrators hope to build a "power ring" that will supply computers across the campus with DC power, said Mr. DeFanti.
The rethinking of how to supply campus power is part of a broader effort to "divorce ourselves from the electrical grid," said Bill St. Arnaud, chief research officer at Canarie Inc., a Canadian computer-networking organization. Power-transmission lines lose a significant amount of energy over long distances, he said, which means that supplying a campus with energy from faraway power plant can be inefficient.
A better strategy, Mr. St. Arnaud said, is to build campus data centers next to a renewable source of power, like a solar plant. High-speed optical transmission lines, he said, would ensure that the computers would seem "as close as next door."

As far as I am seeing, the university has solar panels at the rooftop but I just don’t know if it’s still functioning. If it is, it can be used for us or the university to refrain from using electricity and paying lots of money for it. We could also adopt cooling servers only where they get the hottest.


Campus computing comes up green
Center works to safely dispose of e-waste
By Arthur Raymond, Jarad Reddekopp
http://www.dailyutahchronicle.com/news/campus-computing-comes-up-green-1.345643


Lcal freelance artist Bruce English searches for a new computer monitor for his work. Used electronics are recycled and resold on campus at the Surplus and Salvage Building Local freelance artist Bruce English searches for a new computer monitor for his work. Used electronics are recycled and resold on campus at the Surplus and Salvage Building near the Residence Halls.
Although students enjoy the stylish new Macs and PCs in computing labs across campus, some might stop to ponder the fate of that dusty, old machine with the sticky keys they loved to hate in last year's class.
The U's Green Computing Resource Center helps ensure that electronic dinosaurs, now known as e-waste, stay out of the landfill, and is addressing a host of other environmental issues created by the vast array of technological hardware and processes at the U.
Andrew Reich, an IT architect at the U, explained that the center is addressing issues "across a broad spectrum of environmental concerns."
Some solutions are simple and can be addressed immediately by anyone who uses a computer on campus, Reich said. Using a thumb-drive in place of burning a CD, utilizing network connections for data transfer instead of other media and simply turning off a machine or monitor when you're done with it are all steps that save energy and resources.
In the bigger view, Reich and others involved with the group are looking at where equipment comes from. A new way of evaluating sustainability in products is the so-called "cradle-to-cradle" design scheme, which determines how easily and efficiently a product can be re-utilized and/or recycled before it's made. These design considerations optimize the ability to deal with the product responsibly when its "useful" life is over.
Currently, e-waste generated at the U is processed via the university surplus and salvage department. This department separates anything that still has "utility" from true waste. Usable items are resold, while waste is handled by Guaranteed Recycling Xperts, a company that contracts with the state and local schools to process this e-waste in an environmentally responsible manner.
The Recycling Coalition of Utah, a non-profit group that advocates and provides information on recycling issues, notes the toxicity of components in used equipment. These components include lead, mercury, hexavalent chromium and brominated flame retardants. All are hazardous and can create long-term issues if not handled properly. GRX deconstructs the outdated machinery at their processing facility in Clearfield and isolates anything containing hazardous materials. Some components are re-utilized and some are recycled. Their stated goal is to return 100 percent of the material to the manufacturing process.
Eric Anderson, a GRX regional manager, said their Clearfield facility is processing about 200,000 lbs. of e-waste every month. This includes what he estimated to be seven to eight pallets of material from the U, collected every three weeks.
In addition to tracking the responsible handling of e-waste, the resource center is looking for ways to reduce systems power consumption, efficiently cool the heat generated by equipment like server-centers and centralizing data operations, with a possible campus data center on the horizon.
Reich hopes the center, which he described as "still in its infancy," can develop into a dynamic resource for evaluating and addressing information technology "green" issues campus-wide. Plans are in the works for coordination with the U's Office of Sustainability.
The university could adopt the e-waste management idea by putting e-waste bins in the school to ensure proper disposal of such wastes and could let it stay-out in landfills.




http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=19&Itemid=40http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm
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athina alorro

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Sat Aug 15, 2009 10:45 pm

Find three(3) URL's that talk's about "green campus computing" and suggest ways how the university can adopt this concept.



It is a fact that global warming has been a pretty disturbing issue that should be addressed by humans.The real issue in this problem is the extent of the human activities that are adding to the natural level of warming that contribute to the greenhouse effect, and gives potential bad implications for human society and life on earth.

We are aware that computers have evolved into something that is essential and has been a part of our lives.
Since computers play a vital role in our lives (especially in field of IT), we often forgot that computers also contribute to the degradation of the environment because it uses large amounts of electricity and some even adds to the growing e-wastes.

As one of the major computer users, we should at least be responsible and consider contributing to the preservation of our environment.

Since the assignment clearly specifies green “campus” computing and not green computing only, I will be featuring websites that features schools specifically universities that practice green computing.

Here are some of the websites that I found that features green campus computing.

1. http://www.energymanagement.umich.edu/utilities/energy_management/computing/
2. http://www.dailyutahchronicle.com/news/campus-computing-comes-up-green-1.345643
3 . http://esi.ucsd.edu/esiportal/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=228&Itemid=101

Recommendation..

Just like the universities that I mentioned above, our university can also adopt their strategies in implementing green campus computing.

Based on the strategies from the site that I featured, here are some of my suggestions:

1. Create a specialized department in our university that separates anything that can be still utilized from true e-waste. Usable items are recycled or resold while the ones considered as waste should be handled or turned over to certified companies that process e-waste in an environmentally responsible manner. Aside from reducing waste, this kind of activity can generate financial resources for the university.

2. In order to reduce systems power consumption,

...Avoid using screen savers because it will still consume a certain amount of power even when the computer is idle. The best way is to automatically turn off the monitor after a reasonable period of inactivity.

...The University should also buy equipments that are Energy Star certified to ensure efficiency and will consume less energy compared to non-certified ones.

...In the future, the university should also have a centralize data operation to reduce systems power consumption by concentrating the power consumption on one campus data center instead of a decentralized one.

...And finally..the most obvious of all, make sure to turn off and unplug all power consuming devices when not in use.

On a positive note, I noticed that green campus computing is not a new concept to our university specifically to our College. Even before, I noticed that our college has been already using reused papers. There were also times where some of our professors also use reused papers as test papers during exams.

In addition, I would also like to commend our College for finally replacing some of our CRT monitors to LCD monitors which are more efficient because they can save more energy.
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ailaine adaptar

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Tue Aug 18, 2009 6:12 pm

Find three(3) URL's that talk's about "green campus computing" and suggest ways how the university can adopt this concept.




lol! 1. http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html


study Computer Operating Costs
Computers generate heat and require additional cooling which adds to energy costs.
How Much Energy Does Your Computer System Use?

A typical desktop PC system is comprised of the computer itself (the CPU or the “box”), a monitor, and printer. Your CPU may require approximately 100 watts of electrical power. Add 50-150 watts for a 15-17 inch monitor, proportionately more for larger monitors. The power requirements of conventional laser printers can be as much as 100 watts or more when printing though much less if idling in a “sleep mode.” Ink jet printers use as little as 12 watts while printing and 5 watts while idling.

How a user operates the computer also factors into energy costs. First let’s take the worst case scenario, continuous operation. Assuming you operate a 200 watt PC system day and night everyday, direct annual electrical costs would be over $125 (at $0.075/kWh). In contrast, if you operate your system just during normal business hours, say 40 hours per week, the direct annual energy cost would be about $30 – plus, of course, the cost of providing additional cooling.

Considering the tremendous benefits of computer use, neither of the above cost figures may seem like much, but think of what happens when these costs are multiplied by the many thousands of computers in use at CU. The energy waste dollars add up quickly.


study Energy Efficient Computing
Here are some tested suggestions that may make it possible for you to reduce your computer energy consumption by 80 percent or more while still retaining most or all productivity and other benefits of your computer system, including network connectivity.

>>>> Screen savers save no energy
If screen saver images appear on your monitor for more than 5 minutes, you are wasting energy! Screen saver programs may save the phosphors in your monitor screen, but this is not really a concern with newer monitors, especially LCD screens. And they do not save any energy.

>>>> Enable power management features
Thanks to the U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA), personal computer systems purchased today can be easy on energy. These “Energy Star” computers and monitors can be programmed to automatically “power-down” to a low power state when they are not being used. These efficiency gains can be achieved without any sacrifice in computing performance.
The EPA has estimated that providing computers with “sleep mode” reduces their energy use by 60 to 70 percent – and ultimately could save enough electricity each year to power Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine, cut electric bills by $2 billion, and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by the equivalent of 5 million cars.
Follow these simple steps to access computer and monitor power management features for Macintosh and Windows.

>>>> You Can Turn Your Computer Off!
The common misconception that a computer’s life is shortened by turning it on and off has led some to leave computers on all the time. Others are reluctant to switch their computers on and off a couple times during their workday despite only using this equipment for a fraction of that time. Desktop computers are designed to protect the internal circutry from power damage from on/off switching. Turning PC equipment off at night or on and off a few times a day will not appreciably affect its useful life. Electronic equipment life is a function of operating hours and heat — both these factors are reduced when equipment is switched off. Modern hard drives are designed and tested to operate reliably for thousands of on/off cycles.
Thus, you CAN turn off your computer (and monitor and printer)! The inconvenience of waiting a minute or two for a computer to reboot or peripheral to come on line may be trivial compared to the energy savings achieved by keeping computer equipment off when not in use.

<*******************************************************************************************>


lol! 2. http://www.colorado.edu/its/docs/energy.html

study Suggestions for turning off computer components after a period of inactivity:

Component Time period
Monitor 20 minutes
Hard disks 30 minutes
System standby or hibernation90 minutes

>>>> What about group printers and servers?
Group printers should not be turned off unless no one will be using them for an extended period of time such as overnight or over a weekend. Most group printers also have a power save mode that can be configured according to the needs of the group that it serves. For group printers ITS recommends setting the standby time to 30 minutes.
Servers should not be turned off; however, the monitor on the server is rarely needed and can be turned off when not in use to conserve energy.
In summary, configuring computer components to automatically save energy is the best thing that can be done to conserve energy without impacting your ability to get your job done. It saves energy and money, and is beneficial to the environment. These settings are a matter of personal preference. Select the settings that balance your computer usage with energy savings.

<*******************************************************************************************>


lol! 3. http://www.it.utah.edu/leadership/green/basics.html


study Office Computer-Generated Waste
Important steps toward green computing include modifying paper and toner use, disposal of old computer equipment and purchasing decisions when considering new computer equipment.

>>>> Paper Waste
• Print as little as possible. Review and modify documents on the screen and use print preview. Minimize the number of hard copies and paper drafts you make. Instead of printing, save information to disks, or USB memory sticks.
• Recycle waste paper, have a recycle bin at each community printer and copier location.
• Buy and use recycled paper in your printers and copiers. From an environmental point of view, the best recycled paper is 100 percent post-consumer recycled content.
• Save e-mail whenever possible and avoid needless printing of e-mail messages.
• Use e-mail instead of faxes or send faxes directly from your computer to eliminate the need for a hard copy. When you must fax using hard copies, save paper using a "sticky" fax address note and not a cover sheet.
• On larger documents, use smaller font sizes (consistent with readability) to save paper.
• If your printer prints a test page whenever it is turned on, disable this unnecessary feature.
• Before recycling paper, which has print on only one side, set it aside for use as scrap paper or for printing drafts.
• When documents are printed or copied, use double-sided printing and copying. If possible, use the multiple pages per sheet option on printer properties.
• When general information-type documents must be shared within an office, try circulating them instead of making an individual copy for each person. Even better, make the document electronically available to the audience and display it on a projector.

>>>> Electronic Waste
• Use the campus network where possible to transfer files. This avoids the need to write CDs or DVDs or use floppy diskettes.
• Use USB memory sticks instead of CDs, DVDs, or floppies.
• Use re-writable CDs and DVDs.
• There are hopes of the University Recycling program addressing e-waste in the near future

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Suggestions/ Comments:

I have read that research reveals that most personal desktop computers are not being used the majority of the time they are running and many personal computers nationwide are needlessly left on continuously. With no preconception, our university does belong to this practice- needlessly turning on computers continuously. scratch

No I myself had seen computers in our Laboratory computers that are left turned on. The worst thing is that it was not just once but a couple of times and counting! In this act, I would propose that these computers must be turned off or put to sleep if in idle mode.

No For a couple of time, I had also noticed one of the computers in our laboratory that is frequently in “screen saver’s mode”. In contrast to its name, as stated above, Screen savers save no energy. I am alarmed not on that single computer but on the one using it. I am sorry to know that that computer is exclusive for the technicians and administrators use. See? This campus is pursuing the Green Campus Computing but the mentioned are not setting as examples. I would propose that these staffs must undergo some seminars or orientation regarding this. This does not excuse the administration at higher ranks. We’re referring to all staffs, faculty, and administration end-user’s here. Peace… ^_^ Razz

No This does not excuse the role of the students. Remember that it’s not just the number of computers that is driving energy consumption upward. The way that we use computers also adds to the increasing energy burden. Let’s all help. Let’s do tha “Enable power management features” stated above. The inconvenience of waiting a minute or two for a computer to reboot or peripheral to come on line may be trivial compared to the energy savings achieved by keeping computer equipment off when not in use. In this matter, the university must held a seminar/orientation with regards to green campus computing.

“You're not alone in your effort to create a sustainable campus; you just need to bring your stakeholders together and put the pedal to the metal.” Dian Schaffhauser- 04/01/09

“…going for small wins through grassroots projects "creates a level of confidence that can get the attention of the president." Michael Crowley

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JerusalemAlvaira



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PostSubject: Green Campus Computing   Fri Aug 21, 2009 11:06 am

Global warming has been a major concern for decades now but only few nations take the problem seriously. There are many factors that worsen global warming which is now felt in the different parts of the world, these factors are deforestation and carbon dioxide emitted by cars, aviation industry and power plants. My biggest concern now is the excessive use of computers that consumes electricity and gives out heat energy in the earth’s atmosphere. One example are the fast-growing Business Process Outsourcing companies that spend long hours using their computers for them to operate.

To attend to this problem, there are universities and colleges from the different parts of the world that adopted the concept of Green Campus Computing. Below are the list of their sites where they publish articles and tips about the proper usage of computing materials in their campuses without adding up to the environmental problems:

http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogsection&id=7&Itemid=39
http://www.uoguelph.ca/atguelph/07-02-14/newscomputing.shtml
http://inews.berkeley.edu/articles/Spring2009/green-computing

The University can adopt the concept of Green Campus Computing by simply following these steps:
• Shut down the units in the computer laboratory when not in use. In this way, the heat generated and the electricity consumed will be reduced.
• Prefer using laptop computers than desktop computers.
• Put the pc on standby or hibernation than using screensavers.
• Read books than e-books.
• Dispose damaged hardware components properly.
• Print only the needed douments to reduce the excessive use of bond papers and ink and electricity.
• Educate students and teachers about global warming and green campus computing.


We must remember to start practicing these steps within ourselves and in our community. Global warming is now a worldwide concern and there is no way to stop this problem. All we can do now is to help in slowing down the effects of global warming in order to prolong Earth’s life and to prepare ourselves for its major effects in the future.

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PostSubject: ASSIGNMENT 4   Tue Aug 25, 2009 1:18 pm

http://www.campuscomputing.net/summaries/2000/index.html

The growing demand for IT talent across all sectors of the booming economy poses significant staffing challenges for US colleges and universities, according to new data from The Campus Computing Project. Campus IT officials place “retaining current IT personnel given off-campus competition” and “helping IT personnel stay current with new technologies” at the top of the list of 27 strategic, budget, and personnel issues confronting their institutions over the next two-three years.



http://www.it.utah.edu/leadership/green/index.html



Green computing techniques are easy to incorporate and will result in:

* A reduction in overall operating costs by reducing power use, using shared hardware resources, reusing similar systems, and reducing supplies such as toner, ink and paper.
* Enhanced work environments such as campus computer lab space and office work space with reduced noise pollution and eye strain from traditional CRTs.
* Corporate and social responsibility through a focus on the Triple Bottom Line, an expanded set of success values focusing on people, planet and profit.
* An enhanced University Image: green computing solutions on the U campus can be used as marketing tools for potential students and researchers.


http://inews.berkeley.edu/articles/Spring2009/green-computing



Green computing: Decreasing IT-related energy consumption on campus


Anyone who reads blogs or billboards in Berkeley knows energy efficiency matters to the campus and community. At UC Berkeley, energy efficiency relates to the "triple bottom line" philosophy, the view that social, environmental, and economic consequences should all be considered when planning for the future. Chancellor Birgeneau has committed the University to lowering its greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2014, a target six years ahead of California's statewide goal. But this is a tall order, as much has changed on campus in the last 19 years. For one, the role computers play has dramatically increased — and, despite the improved efficiency of newer machines, so has the energy that computing consumes.
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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Sun Sep 20, 2009 10:59 pm

1. http://www.campuscomputing.net/page/kenneth-c-green-director

KENNETH C. GREEN is the founding director of The Campus Computing Project, the largest continuing study of the role of information technology in American colleges and universities. The project is widely cited by both campus officials and corporate executives as a definitive source for data, information, and insight about information technology planning and policy issues affecting American higher education.
Green is the author/co-author or editor of a dozen books and published research reports and more than 80 articles and commentaries that have appeared in academic journals and professional publications. He is often quoted on higher education, information technology, and labor market issues in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Inside Higher Education, and other print and broadcast media.
An invited speaker at some two dozen academic conferences and professional meetings each year, Green was also the co-executive producer and on-air host of the award-winning Ready2Net programs, a series of satellite broadcasts and Webcasts, sponsored by the California State University-Monterey Bay and focused on the challenges and opportunities that information technology presents to American higher education.
In October 2002, Green received the first EDUCAUSE Award for Leadership in Public Policy and Practice. The award cites his work in creating The Campus Computing Project and recognizes his "prominence in the arena of national and international technology agendas, and the linking of higher education to those agendas."

2. http://ssi.ucsd.edu/esiportal/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=228&Itemid=101

UC San Diego Campus Computing Goes Green- January 28, 2009
The Chronicle of Higher Education
Wednesday, January 28, 2009
By Josh Keller
Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.
Those were a few of the ideas discussed last week at a conference, "Greening the Internet Economy," that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event, held by the University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.
Many of the participants emphasized the importance of systems that could more intelligently measure energy use on the campus. In recent years, colleges have been hurt by the rising costs of powering and cooling their data centers, in part because those costs are difficult to measure and poorly understood (The Chronicle, January 9).
At San Diego, researchers have started work on hardware to help colleges and other organizations understand how to make their servers more efficient. The device, called the GreenLight Instrument, will deploy sensors and software to measure the energy use, humidity, and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Data Center, a popular, self-contained complex of servers.
The goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption, said Thomas A. DeFanti, principal investigator on the project and a senior research strategist at the university's California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology.
"Right now there isn't enough information for somebody to make a definitive decision: Where do I save my money? Do I eliminate disks in my computers, or do I stop them? Do I use more RAM or less RAM?" said Mr. DeFanti. "Nobody has detailed information on this."

3. http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-1228261991.html

Hawaii Pacific University issued the following news release: Hawai'i Pacific University will kick off its Green Campus Project 6-10 p.m., March 9, on upper Fort Street Mall. HPU's Proud to Be Pinoy Club will pioneer the project with its recycling program. The event will be followed at 8 p.m. by a Movie on the Mall - "An Inconvenient Truth" - presented by HPU in collaboration with the Honolulu Culture and Arts District, Fort Street Business Improvement District, and Paradise Cinema.
The Green Campus Project event will start with entertainment from 6-8 p.m., a preface for the club's initiative to provide and maintain HI-5 recycling bins in campus buildings.

Schools are deploying green-technology techniques to help conserve energy and otherwise preserve natural resources. Such strategies run the gamut from automated thermostats and “smart” lighting to virtual servers and computer-part recycling. In some cases, those efforts do more than just shrink a school’s environmental footprint—they can also generate financial benefits that can last years.


In our school, I suggest that the administrators should conduct a meeting as to what action they should take in order to implement green campus computing. After discussing the plan with the faculty, it will be disseminated on the students through constant reminders and posters that would remind the students on what they should do in order to help implement the said action.
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PostSubject: Campus Green Computing   Thu Oct 01, 2009 1:40 am



Green computing or green IT, refers to environmentally sustainable computing or IT. It is "the study and practice of designing, manufacturing, using, and disposing of computers, servers, and associated subsystems—such as monitors, printers, storage devices, and networking and communications systems—efficiently and effectively with minimal or no impact on the environment. Green IT also strives to achieve economic viability and improved system performance and use, while abiding by our social and ethical responsibilities. Thus, green IT includes the dimensions of environmental sustainability, the economics of energy efficiency, and the total cost of ownership, which includes the cost of disposal
and recycling. is the study and practice of using computing resources efficiently."[1]

With increasing recognition that man-made greenhouse gas emissions are a major contributing factor to global warming, enterprises, governments, and society at large now have an important new agenda: tackling environmental issues and adopting environmentally sound practices. Greening our IT products, applications, services, and practices is
both an economic and an environmental imperative, as well as our social responsibility.[2] Therefore, a growing number of IT vendors and users are moving toward green IT and thereby assisting in building a green society and economy.
The goals of green computing are similar to green chemistry; reduce the use of hazardous materials, maximize energy efficiency during the product's lifetime, and promote recyclables or biodegradability of defunct products and factory waste.
-------------------------------------------



1.. http://www.p2000.umich.edu/energy_conservation/ec7.htm

Waste Minimization Procedure
Electrical Conservation Tips:


• Turn the computer off overnight and on weekends;
• Wait until ready to use the PC before turning it on;
• If the computer is going to be inactive for more than 16 minutes, consider turning it off. After this energy needed to run the computer outweighs the start-up energy;
• Do not turn on the printer until ready to print, even an idle printer consumes energy;
• Try to schedule computer-related activities to do them all at once, keeping the computer off at other times;
• If spending a large amount of time at the computer, consider reducing the light level in your office. This may improve cathode ray tube screen visibility as well as save energy.


Technology had given us many advantages that made our daily tasks easier. But as we all know that in all things there is an equal and opposite reaction and in this case, if technology brought us goodness well it have its disadvantages also. We belong to the IT world- the world of the new generation; we have an obligation to educate ourselves on how we can help to promote green campus computing in our university, as well as in our surroundings. Not just to promote and reinforce it but on how we can effectively implement this cause in our university. Knowing that these electronic wastes exist, and we are now informed what we can do to justify the means of green campus computing, thus our responsibility as an IT student does not end in this forum as we made our assignment, and the challenge to make this happens is in our hands.

2. http://www.wesleyan.edu/newsletter/campus/2008/0208greencomputing.html


Westlayan University
"Green Computing Practice"



• Reduce carbon emissions by simply turning off their monitors, or shutting down their computer when they are away.
• always better to shut the computer off if the plan not to use it for a stretch of time
• Night-time remote backup service, a process that would eliminate the need to leave machines overnight.
• Power the Printer off after office hours, or whenever they are not in use.
• Automated power supplies, which work on an electric timer and shut down computers and printers when students’ computer labs are closed.

In order to adopt the concept of “Campus Green Computing”, maybe the school should conduct seminars to the faculty and students. Although each one knows about it, they did not always apply it to themselves. To those who know it already, he/she can also give advice to his/her friends. So, when everyone knows about how important the concepts of “Campus Green Computing” everyone can apply to it.

Ways to adopt the concept:
Turn off the computers when it is not in use.
* Do not turn on the printer until ready to print, even an idle printer consumes energy;
* Try to schedule computer-related activities to do them all at once, keeping the computer off at other times;
* If spending a large amount of time at the computer, consider reducing the light level in your office.

Proper waste management.
* disposed the garbage to proper place.

Lessen paper works to lessen cutting trees

Use flat screen/LCD (Liquid Crysta Display) to lessen the production of carbin dioxide.

3. http://unh.edu/news/campusjournal/2009/Apr/01green.cfm


Green Computing at UNH

At UNH, green is more than a buzzword these days, it is key to survival. Efficiency has become everyone’s business, including Computing and Information Services’ (CIS) staff. In spring 2008, President Mark Huddleston called for a 5 percent annual reduction in energy costs for the university.
In response, CIO Tom Franke charged CIS Telecom and Client Services Interim Director Nancye Jenkins with coming up with creative and practical ways to reduce energy costs in collaboration with the University-wide efforts. Signals recently sat down with Jenkins to discuss CIS’ efforts in this area.


What is the difference between Green IT and sustainability?

NJ: Sustainability is much more comprehensive. Sustainability refers to systemic change, actions to make human systems last longer and have less impact on ecological systems. Areas of sustainability include food, recycling, climate change, energy, transportation, and more. The Office of Sustainability has a terrific website on the work that UNH has accomplished as well as ongoing efforts. Did you know UNH is one of 15 schools to receive an A- in the College Sustainability Report Card 2009?
Green initiatives are generally focused on efficient use of resources. Our efforts in IT are primarily focused on energy conservation, so we tend to refer to this as Green IT.
One of the largest energy consumers in IT is the data center, where we locate the vast majority of our servers. CIS has two data centers. Last Spring, a new heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning system was installed at one of the data centers. Hot aisle/cold aisle containment was implemented to improve efficiency.
Another benefit occurs during winter, when excess server heat is used to warm chilled air to help heat the office space. The other data center has also been economized, with a constant eye toward reducing power consumption. We recently had a data center specific power meter installed to help us track the data center energy usage independent from the entire building. We are looking at increasing the room temperature a few degrees, which would result in a measurable reduction of our consumption and carbon footprint. CIS has also been very proactive the last four to five years in implementing server virtualization, where storage, CPU’s, and networking are pooled.
Desktop power management has been a real focal point for Energy Office—they estimate UNH could save hundreds of thousands of dollars annually if this is implemented. Matt O’Keefe, Campus Energy manager, and I have been working with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) since last fall.
We ran a 6-week pilot with the EPA in November-December, to measure local desktop consumption under three 2-week scenarios. The EPA will be returning to the campus in the next few weeks to discuss the results and iron out a few discrepancies noted with the power meters. If we are successful in implementing this across campus, it will certainly help meet our charge.


What are some ways the UNH community can help with these efforts?

Popular ways for individuals to contribute include turning off power strips, using recycled paper, setting printer defaults to be double-sided, purchasing multi-function devices (for example, all-in-one copier/fax/scanner/printer devices), and purchasing Energy Star® devices. There are many non-IT specific strategies as well, such as carpooling, telecommuting, or swapping out light bulbs. The web has many CO2 calculators to help assess carbon footprints and recommend areas to make a difference.


Signals: I have an old computer. Is it better to buy something more energy efficient, or run it until it expires in hopes to save on replacement costs?

There is currently quite a bit of conversation on this very topic. The decision really does come down to individual circumstances. One camp supports longer lifecycles for hardware, upgrading components when possible, for financial savings and reducing waste stream impact; another camp supports shorter lifecycles to reduce carbon footprint by taking advantage of reduced energy consumption in newer products. Computing performance needs, funding, sustainability goals are all factors.


What are some ways CIS has reached out to the UNH community to help the University save energy?

A good example of working with the community is the work that the CIS data center staff is doing with a small group of mechanical engineering students who approached us last summer. For their senior project, they wanted to create a computational fluid dynamics model to analyze the CIS data center for potential improvements and energy savings. This project has been beneficial for both the students and CIS.
The Computer Store is another example where CIS has responded to green interests in the UNH Community. The Store has been selling Energy Star® and Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool® (EPEAT) qualified computers for quite some time, working closely with both Dell and Apple to bring these products in at competitive pricing. We have also setup a “Green Corner” to display the wide variety of green products that are becoming available. We are also now looking at changing our point-of- sale software to print smaller invoices/receipts based upon a customer’s comment.
A third example is videoconferencing; this is a strategy that is becoming more popular with the advances that have been made in this technology. The UNH Systems Technology Committee (TechTel) presented a proposal to the Information Technology Policy Advisory Committee (ITPAC) back in October for developing a USNH-wide videoconferencing solution, but it was tabled due to our budget challenges. We collaborated with USNH, PSU, KSC, and GSC to demo videoconferencing among all campuses at a USNH Financial Affairs Committee meeting. After a successful demonstration of this technology, Finance and Administration Council (FAC) has committed to providing videoconferencing services to all campus presidents for their quarterly meetings, and we are hoping the TechTel proposal will receive a second look.


What are some of the challenges you face with this initiative?

NJ: Putting sustainability strategies into practice can be difficult, not just in IT, but for the university as a whole. Entrenched business practices, an RCM model that may not directly benefit the department that bears the cost to implement the strategy, actually having the authority to take action, and competing priorities can all be challenges. If IT can play a role, we would welcome an opportunity to brainstorm.




Reference:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_computing
http://energy.ucsb.edu/EnergyInfo/EnergyTips.htm

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AlyssaRae Soriano

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Thu Oct 01, 2009 1:21 pm

UC Berkeley iNews
http://inews.berkeley.edu/articles/Spring2009/green-computing

At UC Berkeley, energy efficiency relates to the "triple bottom line" philosophy, the view that social, environmental, and economic consequences should all be considered when planning for the future. Chancellor Birgeneau has committed the University to lowering its greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2014, a target six years ahead of California's statewide goal. But this is a tall order, as much has changed on campus in the last 19 years. For one, the role computers play has dramatically increased — and, despite the improved efficiency of newer machines, so has the energy that computing consumes.

To support and promote these efforts, the Go Green team recommends launching a "green computing" educational campaign; recognizing and rewarding individuals who conserve energy; adopting campuswide purchasing guidelines for computing equipment; and creating a more effective funding model for energy efficient IT projects. Their long-term recommendations for the University include creating a file-sharing service, upgrading the campus network, establishing a regional data center, and installing "smart" meters to allow for more accurate monitoring of energy usage.

Green computing doesn't mean sacrificing reliability or functionality, said Linda Algazzali, one of the team's seven members. "Any change in the service model needs to take into account that services need to be enhanced, not degraded," she said.


Green Campus Computing at the U of U
(University of Utah)

http://www.it.utah.edu/leadership/green/index.html

U of U students and staff and the residents of Salt Lake City have an opportunity to recycle their household e-waste for free at the U of U campus in conjunction with many campus Earth Day activities. All of the e-waste that is collected at the event will be recycled responsibly by Guaranteed Recycling Xperts (GRX) of Utah. GRX is recognized by the Basel Action Network (BAN) as an E-steward and was awarded the e-waste recycling contract for the State of Utah.

Green computing techniques are easy to incorporate and will result in:
• A reduction in overall operating costs by reducing power use, using shared hardware resources, reusing similar systems, and reducing supplies such as toner, ink and paper.
• Enhanced work environments such as campus computer lab space and office work space with reduced noise pollution and eye strain from traditional CRTs.
• Corporate and social responsibility through a focus on the Triple Bottom Line, an expanded set of success values focusing on people, planet and profit.
• An enhanced University Image: green computing solutions on the U campus can be used as marketing tools for potential students and researchers.


The Chronicle of Higher Education
Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money
By: Josh Keller

http://chronicle.com/article/Campus-Computing-Goes-Green-to/1484/

Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.
Those were a few of the ideas discussed last week at a conference, "Greening the Internet Economy," that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event, held by the University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.
The goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption, said Thomas A. DeFanti, principal investigator on the project and a senior research strategist at the university's California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology.


Exclamation Basic Energy Conservation Strategy: Exclamation
* Turn off your computer and/or peripherals when they are not in use. Turning on and off will not harm the equipment.
* Don’t run computers continuously unless they are in use continuously.
* Turn off at night and on weekends
* Look for ways to reduce the amount of time your computer is on without adversely affecting your productivity.

Actually, even if you implement so many energy conservation strategies, still it is up to the students / people involved on how they conserve energy in their own way. Though, personally, I don’t think I am conserving energy but I am not wasting too much of it either.


[Sorry for the DELAY. lol! ]
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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Tue Oct 06, 2009 6:41 pm

Green Campus Computing


When Kenneth C. Green, the founding director of The Campus Computing Project, inaugurated the said project was widely known now to become a practice in most universities and colleges today. Green Campus Computing is the positive (or least negative) relationship between the physical computer and its impact to the environments in which it moves through during its journey from cradle to grave. I have cited a lot of sites that tackles about green campus computing and I’ve read much of the ways on how it is done and somehow find suggestions on how the university can adopt this concept.
Most of the things that a person can do to “green up” their technology use may seem small. But multiply those small challenges in behaviors by every person. The following are the three cites that I’ve searched on the net that talk about Green Campus Computing:

1. Information Systems and Computing, University of Pennsylvania

http://www.upenn.edu/computing/greenit/fastfacts.html

  • Turn of electronics whenever they are not in use.

It is easy to head off to class or a meeting and to forget to turn off electronics while you're away. Even if turning off your computer is not an option, make sure your monitor is turned off and that the other things you're not using are unplugged, like radios and cell phone chargers. Electrical devices, even chargers with no phones or laptops attached, still draw a current merely by being plugged into the outlet.

In the school, after our laboratory exercises we were reminded by our instructor to shut down the monitors before we leave. We usually do this practice and I’ve observed that electronic outlets we’re not really unplugged. If the school would unplug the electrical devices in the laboratory during unused, it would be a great help in practicing ways in reducing energy consumption and one way in helping the environment.


2. San Diego State University Green Campus
http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=23&Itemid=40

  • Recycling

1)Practice the 4Rs: reduce, reuse, recycle and buy products with recycled content.
2)Recycle white, colored, post-it, shredded and construction paper, empty metal cans, pans, empty clear and colored glass containers, empty plastic bottles, clean plastic wrap and bags, buckets and trays. corrugated (wavy edges) cardboard boxes (please no waxed cardboard and flatten boxes), Styrofoam packing forms (but not packing peanuts), chipboard (small office supply boxes), newspaper, telephone books, catalogs, magazines, brochures, paperback and hardcover books, Kraft (brown paper bag) paper, paper ream wrappers, envelopes (windows ok) and file folders. Non-recyclable items: paper cups or plates, tissues or paper towels, food or wet waste, food or liquid stained items, wood or green waste.
3) Reuse paper that has only been used on one side
4) Recycle your old cell phone to prevent hazardous substances from entering our environment. These substances include lead, arsenic, and cadmium, which have been linked with cancer, neurological disorders, and developmental abnormalities.
5) Recycle your ink cartridges through our campus program.

Recycling is the most advocate of the school mainly in Institute of Computing department. The Solid E-waste management is a huge way in producing less e-waste. In fact, Computers, monitors and other electronics not disposed of correctly really put a strain on the environment, because they contain toxins and are not biodegradable so if not properly disposed it would contribute to the destruction of the environment. I’ve seen that the school had use new LCD monitor from the old monitor that the school usually use. In order for the school to reduce the less production of e-waste, the old computers should be repaired and recycled because it can still be used by the school in providing the students a computer unit in their student works.


3. The Office of Information Technology, University of Utah
http://www.it.utah.edu/leadership/green/bestpractices.html

  • Print as little as possible.

The average office worker goes through 10,000 pages of paper per year. Try to make printing a conscious decision, not a default behavior. Many printers can print double-sided. Talk to your Local Support Provider about making that your default setting. And when you're finished with something, make sure it goes in the recycling bin instead of the trash.

Before printing, review and modify documents on the screen and use print preview. Minimize the number of hard copies and paper drafts you make. Instead of printing, save information to disks, or USB memory sticks. The school can recycle waste paper, have a recycle bin at each community printer and copier location. Buy and use recycled paper in your printers and copiers. From an environmental point of view, the best recycled paper is 100 percent post-consumer recycled content. Save e-mail whenever possible and avoid needless printing of e-mail messages. Use e-mail instead of faxes or send faxes directly from your computer to eliminate the need for a hard copy. When you must fax using hard copies, save paper using a "sticky" fax address note and not a cover sheet.

On larger documents, use smaller font sizes (consistent with readability) to save paper. If your printer prints a test page whenever it is turned on, disable this unnecessary feature. Before recycling paper, which has print on only one side, set it aside for use as scrap paper or for printing drafts. When documents are printed or copied, use double-sided printing and copying. If possible, use the multiple pages per sheet option on printer properties. When general information-type documents must be shared within an office, try circulating them instead of making an individual copy for each person. Even better, make the document electronically available to the audience and display it on a projector.
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