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 Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)

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Ariel Serenado

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PostSubject: Green Campus Computing...   Sat Jul 11, 2009 6:23 am

For this assignment, we are tasked to find 3 URL’s that talks on “Green Campus Computing”.

As I search the internet, I have come to find the following URL’s:


  • http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=join_change_the_world.showPledgeDriverDetails&cpd_id=17345

From this URL, a program is being proposed by a non profit organization. The program is: The Green Campus Program, is a nonprofit organization working toward campus sustainability through encouraging energy preservation, energy efficient student practices and lowering institutional energy costs. The Alliance to Save Energy created the Green Campus Program that is student. The program is dedicated to strive towards maximum energy efficiency throughout campus.


My Suggestion:

In order for the school to adapt it in an efficient way, the project should be a college-based program. So that, form time to time college/departments head will be reminding the students. Because in my own opinion it’s quite difficult to handle such program if its handled by school heads especially that there are activities that divert the attention of students.



  • http://www.environment.uwaterloo.ca/computing/greenit/on_campus.html

In this URL, a school is involved. Green Initiatives insides the campus is very rampant. Designated departments are having their own will and initiatives on pursuing their program on Green Campus Computing.

Departments and their Green Initiatives:

Plant Operations

o Creating and implementing sustainability initiatives around campus through: o Energy Conservation
o Water Conservation
o Waste Management
o Air Quality
o Environmental Projects
o Turf Management
o Transportation

Procurement Services

o Promoting greenpurchasing
o Offers a list of green suppliers to purchase from
o Highlighting the importance of being aware of the impact UW has on the environment

UCIST - University Committee for Information, Systems, and Technology

o Committed to creating a campus-wide Green Computing policy
o To date have formed a subcommittee for Green Computing implementation

My Suggestion:

Better if these programs are integrated in some curricular activities, for the students to integrate environmental awareness to their academic activities.



  • http://www.greencampuscpp.org/takeaction.htm

This third URL talks mainly on promoting the efficient way of energy conservation. They even suggested Ten ways to REDUCE energy usage. Some of the ways are the following: Turn off lights, appliances and computers when not in use. Even for a few minutes! Replace incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFL). Buy Energy Star® labeled appliances. When doing laundry wash full loads and use cold or warm rinses Take shorter or cooler showers.

My Suggestion:

Better if there are policies abiding these things to have a monitored enhancement projection on the role of the students on environmental awareness.
please visit my blog, just follow this link: http://www.arielserenado.blogspot.com
THanks!!! Very Happy


Last edited by ariel_serenado on Tue Jul 14, 2009 12:13 pm; edited 1 time in total
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mae m. mara

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Sat Jul 11, 2009 12:35 pm

Find three (3) URL's that talk's about "green campus computing" and suggest ways how the university can adopt this concept.

Green computing is the environmentally responsible use of computers and related resources. Such practices include the implementation of energy-efficient central processing units (CPUs), servers and peripherals as well as reduced resource consumption and proper disposal of electronic waste (e-waste).

One of the earliest initiatives toward green computing in the United States was the voluntary labeling program known as Energy Star. It was conceived by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1992 to promote energy efficiency in hardware of all kinds. The Energy Star label became a common sight, especially in notebook computers and displays. Similar programs have been adopted in Europe and Asia.

Government regulation, however well-intentioned, is only part of an overall green computing philosophy. The work habits of computer users and businesses can be modified to minimize adverse impact on the global environment. Here are some steps that can be taken:

* Power-down the CPU and all peripherals during extended periods of inactivity.
* Try to do computer-related tasks during contiguous, intensive blocks of time, leaving hardware off at other times.
* Power-up and power-down energy-intensive peripherals such as laser printers according to need.
* Use liquid-crystal-display (LCD) monitors rather than cathode-ray-tube (CRT) monitors.
* Use notebook computers rather than desktop computers whenever possible.
* Use the power-management features to turn off hard drives and displays after several minutes of inactivity.
* Minimize the use of paper and properly recycle waste paper.
* Dispose of e-waste according to federal, state and local regulations.
* Employ alternative energy sources for computing workstations, servers, networks and data centers.
SOURCE: http://searchdatacenter.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid80_gci1246959,00.html


Green computing is the term used to denote efficient use of resources in computing. This term generally relates to the use of computing resources in conjunction with minimizing environmental impact, maximizing economic viability and ensuring social duties. Green computing is very much related to other similar movements like reducing the use of environmentally hazardous materials like CFCs, promoting the use of recyclable materials, minimizing use of non-biodegradable components, and encouraging use of sustainable resources.
One of the spin-offs of green computing is EPEAT or Electronic Products Environmental Assessment Tool. EPEAT products serve to increase the efficiency and life of computing products. Moreover, these products are designed to minimize energy expenditures, minimize maintenance activities throughout the life of the product and allow the re-use or recycling of some materials.
A Brief History of Green Computing

One of the first manifestations of the green computing movement was the launch of the Energy Star program back in 1992. Energy Star served as a kind of voluntary label awarded to computing products that succeeded in minimizing use of energy while maximizing efficiency. Energy Star applied to products like computer monitors, television sets and temperature control devices like refrigerators, air conditioners, and similar items.

One of the first results of green computing was the Sleep mode function of computer monitors which places a consumer's electronic equipment on standby mode when a pre-set period of time passes when user activity is not detected. As the concept developed, green computing began to encompass thin client solutions, energy cost accounting, virtualization practices, eWaste, etc.

Green Computing Groups

Currently, one of the popular green computing groups is tactical incrementalists. This group applies and uses green computing philosophies mainly to save up on costs rather than save the environment. This green computing concept emerged naturally as businesses find themselves under pressure to maximize resources in order to compete effectively in the market. This movement arose mainly from economic sentiments rather than political pressure.

Strategic Leaders take into account the social and environmental impacts of new and emerging technologies. Aside from minimizing costs, this particular movement also takes into account other factors such as marketing and branding. Unlike the position held by tactical incrementalists, strategic leaders recognize the need to overhaul some existing policies or structural makeup of the organization. This can be seen in recent efforts to make IT personnel directly responsible for managing, minimizing and ensuring efficient energy expenditures.

SOURCE: http://www.tech-faq.com/green-computing.shtml

Green computing is the study and practice of using computing resources efficiently. The primary objective of such a program is to account for the triple bottom line, an expanded spectrum of values and criteria for measuring organizational (and societal) success. The goals are similar to green chemistry; reduce the use of hazardous materials, maximize energy efficiency during the product's lifetime, and promote recyclability or biodegradability of defunct products and factory waste.

Modern IT systems rely upon a complicated mix of people, networks and hardware; as such, a green computing initiative must be systemic in nature, and address increasingly sophisticated problems. Elements of such a solution may comprise items such as end user satisfaction, management restructuring, regulatory compliance, disposal of electronic waste, telecommuting, and virtualization of server resources, energy use, thin client solutions, and return on investment (ROI).

The imperative for companies to take control of their power consumption, for technology and more generally, therefore remains acute. One of the most effective power management tools available in 2009 may still be simple, plain, common sense.
Origins

In 1992, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency launched Energy Star, a voluntary labeling program which is designed to promote and recognize energy-efficiency in monitors, climate control equipment, and other technologies. This resulted in the widespread adoption of sleep mode among consumer electronics. The term "green computing" was probably coined shortly after the Energy Star program began; there are several USENET posts dating back to 1992 which use the term in this manner. Concurrently, the Swedish organization TCO Development launched the TCO Certification program to promote low magnetic and electrical emissions from CRT-based computer displays; this program was later expanded to include criteria on energy consumption, ergonomics, and the use of hazardous materials in construction.

SOURCE:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_computing

We all know that technology got its best to the top. In what way we could use technology in conserving our environment. Here are my ways on how we could help.
• Reduce electric power consumptions – turn off computers immediately when not needed or use those power saver technologies.
• Educational Programs – in this way, students are orient to use technology minimally. They should be orient to reduce using products that has hazardous elements.
• DO Your Duty – as a user, you should do your duty as well. Buy only those things that are usable. Reduce power consumption.
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John Cesar E. Manlangit

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PostSubject: Green Campus Computing   Sun Jul 12, 2009 2:55 am

1. http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html

The growing use of computers on campus has caused a dramatic increase in energy consumption, putting negative pressure on CU’s budget and the environment. Each year more and more computers are purchased and put to use, but it’s not just the number of computers that is driving energy consumption upward. The way that we use computers also adds to the increasing energy burden.
Research reveals that most personal desktop computers are not being used the majority of the time they are running and many personal computers nationwide are needlessly left on continuously. Every time we leave computers or lights on we waste electricity. Burning fossil fuels generates most of our electricity and it also emits pollutants, sulfur, and carbon dioxide into the air. These emissions can cause respiratory disease, smog, acid rain and global climate change.
Some suggestions that may make it possible for you to reduce your computer energy consumption by 80 percent or more:

a. Turn off your screen savers.
b. Enable power management features
c. Turn off your computer and/or peripherals when they are not in use.
d. Don’t run computers continuously unless they are in use continuously.

2. http://www.uwf.edu/helpdesk/eco/

a.Think before you print.

Consider the damage caused to the environment by logging and factor in the energy spent processing and transporting paper, then you can begin to understand the enormous impact of printing. Fortunately technology can help - email is the likely cause of the reduction of standard mail by 5.9 million pieces between 2002 and 2006, saving 4.4 million trees. Unfortunately, when we print email we undo the good. You can help remind others to think before they print, by including a "think before you print" message in your email signature.

b.Reduce computer and monitor power consumption.
• Use LCD flat-screen monitors which require half the power required by CRT (big box) monitors.
• Don't use a screen saver on a flat-screen LCD monitor. A screen saver does nothing to protect an LCD monitor, but does consume unnecessary energy.
• Set your monitor to automatically turn off after 15 minutes of inactivity.
• Turn off your computer (or at least the monitor) when not in use.

c.Properly dispose of IT equipment.
• Make your Computer Last
• Disposal of UWF Electronics
• Disposal of Personal Electronics

3. http://www.eastcentral.edu/admin/mis/green_computing.html

Energy Efficient Computing

A. Enabling Power Management Features
B. Turning off Computers/Peripherals when not in use.

Some Specific Suggestions
• Unless you require immediate access to e-mail or the internet, break the habit of turning on all your computer equipment as soon as you enter the office each day.
• If practical, informally group your computer activities and try to do them during one or two parts of the day, leaving the computer off at other times.
• Avoid using the switch on a powerstrip to turn on all your equipment.
• If you use a laser printer, don’t turn your printer on until you are ready to print.
• Turn off your entire computer system (CPU, monitor and printer) or at least your monitor and printer when you go to lunch or will be out of the office for a meeting or an errand.
• For "computer servers" which must be on to serve network functions, explore ways to turn servers off at night.
• If monitors are not needed for "servers" to operate, keep server monitors off. If server monitor is needed during the day, at least turn it off at night and on weekends.

Reusing and Recycling Printer Toner Cartridges and Computer Diskettes
ECC generates hundreds of spent printer toner cartridges a year. Instead of tossing these in the garbage can, they can be recycled, thus saving resources and reducing pollution and solid waste.
Computer diskettes may be inexpensive, but why keep buying more if you don’t need to? Diskettes with outdated information on them can be reformatted and reused.

How to Reduce Paper
Rather than creating a paperless office, computer use has vastly increased paper consumption and paper waste. Here are some suggestions for reducing this waste:
• Print as little as possible. Review and modify documents on the screen. Minimize the number of hard copies and paper drafts you make. Instead of printing, save information to disks.
• Use E-mail whenever possible and avoid needless printing of E-mail messages.
• Use E-mail instead of faxes.
• On larger documents, use smaller font sizes (consistent with readability) to save paper.
• If your printer prints a test page whenever it is turned on, disable this unnecessary feature.
• Recycle waste paper.
• Before recycling paper which has print on only one side, set it aside for use as scrap paper or in printing drafts.
• Buy and use recycled paper in your printers and copiers. If skeptical, buy a small quantity first and check results. From an environmental point of view, the best recycled paper is 100 percent post consumer recycled content and is either not de-inked or is "process chlorine free" (bleached without chlorine). When documents are copied, use double-sided copying.
• When general information-type documents must be shared within an office, try circulating them instead of making an individual copy for each person. This can also be done easily by e-mail.
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jojimie

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Sun Jul 12, 2009 12:57 pm





OFFICE COMPUTER-GENERATED WASTE


Important steps toward green computing include modifying paper and toner use, disposal of old computer equipment and purchasing decisions when considering new computer equipment.


Paper Waste

• Print as little as possible. Review and modify documents on the screen and use print preview. Minimize the number of hard copies and paper drafts you make. Instead of printing, save information to disks, or USB memory sticks.
• Recycle waste paper, have a recycle bin at each community printer and copier location.
• Buy and use recycled paper in your printers and copiers. From an environmental point of view, the best recycled paper is 100 percent post-consumer recycled content.
• Save e-mail whenever possible and avoid needless printing of e-mail messages.
• Use e-mail instead of faxes or send faxes directly from your computer to eliminate the need for a hard copy. When you must fax using hard copies, save paper using a "sticky" fax address note and not a cover sheet.
• On larger documents, use smaller font sizes (consistent with readability) to save paper.
• If your printer prints a test page whenever it is turned on, disable this unnecessary feature.
• Before recycling paper, which has print on only one side, set it aside for use as scrap paper or for printing drafts.
• When documents are printed or copied, use double-sided printing and copying. If possible, use the multiple pages per sheet option on printer properties.
• When general information-type documents must be shared within an office, try circulating them instead of making an individual copy for each person. Even better, make the document electronically available to the audience and display it on a projector.
Electronic Waste
• Use the campus network where possible to transfer files. This avoids the need to write CDs or DVDs or use floppy diskettes.
• Use USB memory sticks instead of CDs, DVDs, or floppies.
• Use re-writable CDs and DVDs.
• There are hopes of the University Recycling program addressing e-waste in the near future



http://www.it.utah.edu/leadership/green/basics.html Basketball



ENERGY EFFICIENT COMPUTING


Here are some tested suggestions that may make it possible for you to reduce your computer energy consumption by 80 percent or more while still retaining most or all productivity and other benefits of your computer system, including network connectivity.

Screen savers save no energy





if screen saver images appear on your monitor for more than 5 minutes, you are wasting energy! Screen saver programs may save the phosphors in your monitor screen, but this is not really a concern with newer monitors, especially LCD screens. And they do not save any energy.
A screen saver that displays moving images causes your monitor to consume as much as electricity as it does when in active use. These screen saver programs also involve system interaction with your CPU that results in additional energy consumption. A blank screen saver is slightly better but even that only reduces monitor energy consumption by a few percent.



When not in use, turn off the juice

This is the most basic energy conservation strategy for any type of equipment. Consider the following:
• Turn off your computer and/or peripherals when they are not in use. Turning on and off will not harm the equipment.
• Don’t run computers continuously unless they are in use continuously.
• Turn off at night and on weekends
• Look for ways to reduce the amount of time your computer is on without adversely affecting your productivity.


OTHER GREEN COMPUTING PRACTICES


You can take a giant step toward environmentally responsible or “green” computing by conserving energy with your computer. But green computing involves other important steps as well. These pertain to paper use, toner cartridges, disposal of old computer equipment and purchasing decisions when considering new computer equipment.
Reducing Paper Waste
Rather than creating a paperless office, computer use has vastly increased paper consumption and paper waste. Here are some suggestions for reducing waste:
• Print as little as possible. Review and modify documents on the screen and use print preview. Minimize the number of hard copies and paper drafts you make. Instead of printing, save information to disks.
Recycle waste paper.
• Buy and use recycled paper in your printers and copiers. From an environmental point of view, the best recycled paper is 100 percent post consumer recycled content.



http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.htm Basketball




Campus User
Green Computing Guide



There are 3 stages in the life cycle of an electronic product –
(1) the decision to purchase a product, (2) use and maintenance
of the product, and (3) its end life. At each stage, you can make
decisions that lessen the environmental impact and promote
better use of resources.

Purchasing Products


Do your research to ensure you purchase equipment that was made
with efforts to reduce environmental impact. The EPA offers a
procurement resource called “Electronic Product
Environmental Assessment Tool” to help purchasers evaluate and
compare computer equipment. It also includes information about
which manufacturers will take back and recycle their old products.
EPA’s Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool
http://www.epeat.net/

Some things to consider

• PROTECT OUR ENVIRONMENT: Buy from companies that design
their products to be easily recycled with less toxic materials,
increased energy conservation, recyclable packaging, with longer life
spans, and the option to upgrade.
• PROTECT THE HEALTH, SAFETY, AND ETHICAL TREATMENT OF
WORKERS WORLDWIDE: Buy from companies with ethical labor
standards for their employees and sub‐contractors which pay decent
wages, control health and safety risks, prohibit child and prison labor,
prohibit discrimination by gender, religion, race, caste, ethnicity,
sexual orientation, disability, union membership, or political
affiliation.
Many of the computers that were issued by IT to the campus
community meet the EPEAT gold or silver standard. As older
computers continue to be replaced, we are working towards having
all computers meet this standard. All CRT monitors on campus are
being replaced by flat screen LCDs which save a lot more energy.

http://www.fullerton.edu/it/news/publications/green_computing_guide.pdf




Simple steps you can take to save energy and resources

SCREEN SAVERS SAVE NO ENERGY

A screen saver that displays moving images causes your monitor to consume as much as electricity as it
does when in active use. Screen saver programs may save the phosphors in your monitor screen, but
this is not a concern with newer monitors, especially LCD screens. These screen saver programs also
involve system interaction with your CPU that results in additional energy consumption. The best option
is NOT to use a screen saver.

REDUCE YOUR COMPUTER’S POWER AND OPERATING COSTS


Campus computers will automatically go into stand‐by mode after 1 hour of inactivity. Monitors go sleep
after 20 minutes of idle time. Using the “stand‐by” feature will save you almost as much energy as if you
were to turn off your computer for the night. Your computer only truly uses zero energy when it is
unplugged. Computers should not be turned off at night or unplugged so that critical updates and
security patches can be downloaded from the network by your computer. It is important for your
computer to maintain local‐area network connectivity for security reasons. Monitors do use zero energy
when turned off. When you leave for the day, turn off your monitor, your printer and other peripherals.
Leave your computer in stand‐by mode. For more information about your Power Management settings.
http://www.fullerton.edu/it/services/Hardware/FAQ/powermgmt.asp


REDUCING PAPER WASTE AND TONER USAGE
While a paperless environment can be a goal to strive for, it takes a
coordinated commitment and changes in processes to accomplish
something like this. If that is not possible with your office, try these
suggestions:
--Print as little as possible.
-- Buy and use recycled paper
http://www.fscus.org/.

--Use e‐mail instead of faxes
--Reuse paper and recycle waste paper
-- Use double‐sided printing and copying.
-- Use smaller font sizes
--Print in “toner‐saving mode”

TOP TEN ways to REDUCE ENERGY usage


1. Turn off lights, appliances and computers when not in use. Even for a few minutes!
2. Replace incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFL).
3. Plug electronics into power strips and turn them off when not in use to avoid phantom loads.
4. Turn down your thermostat and put on a sweater in the winter; turn up the thermostat and turn on a fan in the summer!
5. Turn your computer Monitor to save mode, screen savers don't save energy! Enable Power Management: In Windows XP; In Mac OS X, You go to 'System Preferences', click on the 'Energy Saver' icon, and set the computer and display (monitor), and Hard Drive to go to sleep. Alternatively, you can use a third-party program, or Press Cmd-Shift-Eject and your OS X Mac will immediately enter sleep mode.
6. Buy Energy Star® labeled appliances.
7. When doing laundry, wash full loads and use cold or warm rinses
8. Take shorter or cooler showers.
9. Waiting until after 7pm (after peak) to use appliances, such as, washers, dryers, and electric heaters, can help reduce to use of the dirtiest power plants.
10. Share a fridge with room/suite mates and keep it full.



http://www.greencampuscpp.org/takeaction.htm Basketball

References:


http://www.ecofont.eu/ecofont_en.html


http://www.fullerton.edu/it/news/publications/green_computing_guide.pdf

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Sheila Capacillo

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PostSubject: Green Campus Computing   Mon Jul 13, 2009 12:02 am

Razz
What is Green Computing?
Green computing is the environmentally responsible use of computers and related resources. Such practices include the implementation of energy-efficient central processing units (CPUs), servers and peripherals as well as reduced resource consumption and proper disposal of electronic waste (e-waste).

I think when it pertains to Green Campus Computing, it defines the practices on how to minimize the effect of computers or any computin devices in our environment.
These are the three url's that contains the different articles releted to Green Computing

http://inews.berkeley.edu/
Green computing: Decreasing IT-related energy consumption on campus
April 23, 2009
Steven Lance, DCIO–Communications
Enter the Go Green team, one of three project teams from the 2008 Leadership Development Program (LDP). After spending six months researching computing practices at UC Berkeley and other leading institutions, this group of staff-members from various departments on campus published a report detailing recommendations for managing changes in strategy, infrastructure, and culture to decrease IT-related energy consumption.
UC Berkeley is already exploring energy-saving measures such as power management software, server colocation, server virtualization, and even desktop virtualization. Almost everywhere on campus, cathode-ray tube (CRT) monitors are being replaced with more efficient LCD flat-screens [1]. To support and promote these efforts, the Go Green team recommends launching a "green computing" educational campaign; recognizing and rewarding individuals who conserve energy; adopting campuswide purchasing guidelines for computing equipment; and creating a more effective funding model for energy efficient IT projects. Their long-term recommendations for the University include creating a file-sharing service, upgrading the campus network, establishing a regional data center, and installing "smart" meters to allow for more accurate monitoring of energy usage.
Green computing doesn't mean sacrificing reliability or functionality, said Linda Algazzali, one of the team's seven members. "Any change in the service model needs to take into account that services need to be enhanced, not degraded," she said.

http://www.ecomii.com/tips/green-computing

Green Computing
Change your computer habits to use less energy and save money.


The computers we all use day in and day out are huge energy wasters, unless we know how to manage them responsibly. Using sleep mode, avoiding screensavers, and remembering to always shut down your computer when you aren’t using it for an extended period of time, are all small actions that have big benefits.

http://blogs.nwf.org/campus/2009/01/green-it.html
Greener IT on campus

Turning off computers at night is a good first step, but given that some estimates put emissions from computing at the same level as the aviation industry, much bigger steps are needed.


Our University can adopt the concept through many ways, we should practice these some of these things:

•Power-down the CPU and all peripherals during extended periods of inactivity.
•Try to do computer-related tasks during contiguous, intensive blocks of time, leaving hardware off at other times.
•Power-up and power-down energy-intensive peripherals such as laser printers according to need.
•Use liquid-crystal-display (LCD) monitors rather than cathode-ray-tube (CRT) monitors.
•Use notebook computers rather than desktop computers whenever possible.
•Use the power-management features to turn off hard drives and displays after several minutes of inactivity.
•Minimize the use of paper and properly recycle waste paper.
•Dispose of e-waste according to federal, state and local regulations.
•Employ alternative energy sources for computing workstations, servers, networks and data centers.

Other References:
http://searchdatacenter.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid80_gci1246959,00.html


Last edited by Sheila Capacillo on Mon Jul 13, 2009 11:56 pm; edited 1 time in total
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florenzie_palma

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Mon Jul 13, 2009 11:16 am

EVER-GREEN


For this assignment i have searched some URL's which can be applied and exercised by the university to apply the "Green Campus Computing" concept.

bounce Idea bounce http://searchdatacenter.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid80_gci1246959,00.html

Green computing is the environmentally responsible use of computers and related resources. Such practices include the implementation of energy-efficient central processing units( CPUs), servers and peripherals as well as reduced resource consumption and proper disposal
of electronic was
te (e-waste).

One of the earliest initiatives toward green computing in the United States was the voluntary labeling program known as Energy Star. It was conceived by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1992 to promote energy efficiency in hardware of all kinds. The Energy Star label became a common sight, especially in notebook computers and displays. Similar programs have been adopted in Europe and Asia.

Government regulation, however well-intentioned, is only part of an overall green computing philosophy. The work habits of computer users and businesses can be modified to minimize adverse impact on the global environment. Here are some steps that can be taken:

* Power-down the CPU and all peripherals during extended periods of inactivity.
* Try to do computer-related tasks during contiguous, intensive blocks of time, leaving hardware off at other times.
* Power-up and power-down energy-intensive peripherals such as laser printers according to need.
* Use liquid-crystal-display (LCD) monitors rather than cathode-ray-tube (CRT) monitors.
* Use notebook computers rather than desktop computers whenever possible.
* Use the power-management features to turn off hard drives and displays after several minutes of inactivity.
* Minimize the use of paper and properly recycle waste paper.
* Dispose of e-waste according to federal, state and local regulations.
* Employ alternative energy sources for computing workstations, servers, networks and data centers.


bounce Idea bounce http://www.it.utah.edu/leadership/green/basics.html


Green Computing Best Practices for End Users

With thousands of desktop computers in, there is a great amount of power used and a great amount of both paper and electronic waste produced. Some simple solutions can help to reduce the impact of these deployments. Please make use of these best practices in order to develop a practice that best fits your individual needs. These suggestions are intended for users who manage their own computer. If you have a computer administrator, you will want to discuss these practices first on order not to interfere with any automated processes that may be running on your computer.


Embarassed Power Management

Important steps toward green computing include modifying paper and toner use, disposal of old computer equipment and purchasing decisions when considering new computer equipment.

Embarassed Paper Waste

* Print as little as possible. Review and modify documents on the screen and use print preview. Minimize the number of hard copies and paper drafts you make. Instead of printing, save information to disks, or USB memory sticks.
* Recycle waste paper, have a recycle bin at each community printer and copier location.
* Buy and use recycled paper in your printers and copiers. From an environmental point of view, the best recycled paper is 100 percent post-consumer recycled content.
* Save e-mail whenever possible and avoid needless printing of e-mail messages.
* Use e-mail instead of faxes or send faxes directly from your computer to eliminate the need for a hard copy. When you must fax using hard copies, save paper using a "sticky" fax address note and not a cover sheet.
* On larger documents, use smaller font sizes (consistent with readability) to save paper.
* If your printer prints a test page whenever it is turned on, disable this unnecessary feature.
* Before recycling paper, which has print on only one side, set it aside for use as scrap paper or for printing drafts.
* When documents are printed or copied, use double-sided printing and copying. If possible, use the multiple pages per sheet option on printer properties.
* When general information-type documents must be shared within an office, try circulating them instead of making an individual copy for each person. Even better, make the document electronically available to the audience and display it on a projector.


Embarassed Electronic Waste

* Use the campus network where possible to transfer files. This avoids the need to write CDs or DVDs or use floppy diskettes.
* Use USB memory sticks instead of CDs, DVDs, or floppies.
* Use re-writable CDs and DVDs.
* There are hopes of the University Recycling program addressing e-waste in the near future
o Until then The Recycling Coalition of Utah has resources for e-waste
o Also check the calendar for free e-waste collections


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florenzie_palma

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Mon Jul 13, 2009 11:16 am

bounce Idea bounce http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html

The growing use of computers on campus has caused a dramatic increase in energy consumption, putting negative pressure on CU’s budget and the environment. Each year more and more computers are purchased and put to use, but it’s not just the number of computers that is driving energy consumption upward. The way that we use computers also adds to the increasing energy burden.

Research reveals that most personal desktop computers are not being used the majority of the time they are running and many personal computers nationwide are needlessly left on continuously. Every time we leave computers or lights on we waste electricity. Burning fossil fuels
generates most of our electricity and it also emits pollutants, sulfur, and carbon dioxide into the air. These emissions can cause respiratory disease, smog, acid rain and global climate change.


drunken Computer Operating Costs

Over the last fifteen years, computers have transformed the academic and administrative landscape at the University of Colorado. There are now over 18,000 computers on campus. Personal computers (PC) operation alone may directly account for nearly $550,000 per year in University energy costs.

Computers generate heat and require additional cooling which adds to energy costs. Thus, the overall energy cost of CU’s personal computers is more likely around $700,000.

Meeting computer cooling needs in summer (and winter) often compromises the efficient use of building cooling and heating systems by requiring colder fan discharge temperatures. In the summer, these temperatures may satisfy computer lab cooling needs while overcooling other spaces.

Given CU’s commitment to energy conservation and the environmental stewardship, we must address the issue of responsible computer use. By adopting conserving practices, annual savings of $300,000-400,000 are possible.

cyclops Shocked How Much Energy Does Your Computer System Use?

A typical desktop PC system is comprised of the computer itself (the CPU or the “box”), a monitor, and printer. Your CPU may require approximately 100 watts of electrical power. Add 50-150 watts for a 15-17 inch monitor, proportionately more for larger monitors. The power requirements of conventional laser printers can be as much as 100 watts or more when printing though much less if idling in a “sleep mode.” Ink jet printers use as little as 12 watts while printing and 5 watts while
idling.


drunken Energy Efficient Computing

Here are some tested suggestions that may make it possible for you to reduce
your computer energy consumption by 80 percent or more while still
retaining most or all productivity and other benefits of your computer
system, including network connectivity.

drunkenScreen savers save no energy

If screen saver images appear on your monitor for more than 5 minutes, you
are wasting energy! Screen saver programs may save the phosphors in
your monitor screen, but this is not really a concern with newer
monitors, especially LCD screens. And they do not save any energy.

A screen saver that displays moving images causes your monitor to consume
as much as electricity as it does when in active use. These screen
saver programs also involve system interaction with your CPU that
results in additional energy consumption. A blank screen saver is
slightly better but even that only reduces monitor energy consumption
by a few percent.

drunken Enable power management features

Thanks to the U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA), personal computer
systems purchased today can be easy on energy. These “Energy Star”
computers and monitors can be programmed to automatically “power-down”
to a low power state when they are not being used. These efficiency
gains can be achieved without any sacrifice in computing performance.

The EPA has estimated that providing computers with “sleep mode” reduces
their energy use by 60 to 70 percent – and ultimately could save enough
electricity each year to power Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine, cut
electric bills by $2 billion, and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by
the equivalent of 5 million cars.

Arrow Follow these simple steps to access computer and monitor power management features for Macintosh and Windows.

Macintosh:

* From any application select the Apple menu
* Select “System Preferences...” (OS X) or “Control Panels” (OS 9) and then click on “Energy Saver”

Windows:

* Point your cursor at the desktop background and right-click
* Choose “Properties” from the pop up menu
* Go to the “Screen Saver” page; in the lower right-hand corner near
the ENERGY STAR® logo click the “Settings” button. This brings up
another dialog box where you choose power management settings.

The recommended settings are 20 minutes for monitor sleep and 30 minutes
for system sleep. Remember that to save energy with your monitor’s
built-in power management system, your monitor must go to sleep (shut
itself down).

For more conservation tips and PC power options visit Facilities Management’s Resource Conservation news page, and then click on “PC Power Options.”


drunkenWhen not in use, turn off the juice

This is the most basic energy conservation strategy for any type of equipment. Consider the following:

* Turn off your computer and/or peripherals when they are not in use. Turning on and off will not harm the equipment.
* Don’t run computers continuously unless they are in use continuously.
* Turn off at night and on weekends
* Look for ways to reduce the amount of time your computer is on without adversely affecting your productivity.

drunken You Can Turn Your Computer Off!

The common misconception that a computer’s life is shortened by turning it
on and off has led some to leave computers on all the time. Others are
reluctant to switch their computers on and off a couple times during
their workday despite only using this equipment for a fraction of that
time.

Desktop computers are designed to protect the internal
circutry from power damage from on/off switching. Turning PC equipment
off at night or on and off a few times a day will not appreciably
affect its useful life. Electronic equipment life is a function of
operating hours and heat — both these factors are reduced when
equipment is switched off. Modern hard drives are designed and tested
to operate reliably for thousands of on/off cycles.

Thus, you CAN turn off your computer (and monitor and printer)! The inconvenience
of waiting a minute or two for a computer to reboot or peripheral to
come on line may be trivial compared to the energy savings achieved by
keeping computer equipment off when not in use.

drunkenSome specific suggestions

* Unless you require immediate access to e-mail or other Internet
services, break the habit of turning on all your computer equipment as
soon as you enter the office each day.
* If practical, informally
group your computer activities and try to do then during one or two
parts of the day, leaving the computer off at other times.
* Avoid using the switch on a powerstrip to turn on all your equipment.
* If you use a laser printer, don’t turn your printer on until you are ready to print.
* Turn off your entire computer system (CPU, monitor and printer) or at
least your monitor and printer when you go to lunch or will be out of
office for a meeting or an errand.
* For “computer servers” which must be on to serve network functions, explore ways to turn servers off at night.
* If monitors are not needed for “servers” to operate, keep server
monitors off. If server monitor is needed during the day, at least turn
it off at night and weekends.

While the energy saving suggestions listed above is appropriate for many campus PC users, some
of the suggestions may be inappropriate for certain computer
applications or work situations. When in doubt, discuss possible energy
conservation measures with your colleagues, supervisor, or computer lab
director to determine which steps can be taken without harming
productivity.

Our energy conservation program will not work without your help. Be an energy educator and gently remind your co-workers and colleagues to save energy by changing their computer
habits. Circulate this booklet among the members in your office or
department. Gain the support of your supervisor and set up a brief
meeting to discuss how to implement energy saving strategies.

drunken Other Green Computing Practices

You can take a giant step toward environmentally responsible or “green”
computing by conserving energy with your computer. But green computing
involves other important steps as well. These pertain to paper use,
toner cartridges, disposal of old computer equipment and purchasing
decisions when considering new computer equipment.

drunken Reducing Paper Waste

Rather than creating a paperless office, computer use has vastly increased
paper consumption and paper waste. Here are some suggestions for
reducing waste:

* Print as little as possible. Review and modify documents on the screen and use print preview. Minimize the number of hard copies and paper drafts you make. Instead of printing, save information to disks.
* Recycle waste paper.
* Buy and use recycled paper in your printers and copiers. From an environmental point of view, the best recycled paper is 100 percent post consumer recycled content.

* Save e-mail whenever possible and avoid needless printing of e-mail messages.
* Use e-mail instead of faxes or send faxes directly from your computer to eliminate the need for a hard copy. When you must fax using hard copies, save paper using a “sticky” fax address note and not a cover sheet.
* On larger documents, use smaller font sizes (consistent with readability) to save paper.
* If your printer prints a test page whenever it is turned on, disable this unnecessary feature.
* Before recycling paper, which has print on only one side, set it aside for use as scrap paper or in printing drafts.
* When documents are printed or copied, use double-sided printing and
copying. If possible, use the multiple pages per sheet option on
printer properties.
* When general information-type documents must
be shared within an office, try circulating them instead of making an
individual copy for each person. This can also be done easily by e-mail.


How can the university adopt these different techniques in green campus computing?

When I was still a neophyte in USeP-Tagum Campus, I have noticed in our
school computer laboratory that every after our class laboratories we
didn’t turn off or even stand-by the computers. We just only let it
turn on and wait for the class to use it. Thus, we are not practicing
“green campus computing” in the institution of higher education.

To apply the concept of green campus computing in our academia, the first step we should take is to get the support and cooperation of the administration, faculty and staff of the university. They must be totally aware of the perception of green campus computing, particularly, its advantages and its effects in the society and to the environment as a whole. They must be the paradigm in manifesting the green campus computing. They must undertake a proper education or they
must have a further study and attend symposiums and seminars regarding on this subject matter to have know-how and to broaden their ideas and knowledge on green campus computing.

Second, the student must be also be oriented and be sensitive about this concept. Predominantly, on its effects, purpose and the advantages it brings to the society and especially to our mother nature. More to the point, they must be participative and their full cooperation is highly needed upon the execution of the act.

Student leaders may also lead their constituents in implementing and achieving a greener computing environment. Imposing strict policies inside the laboratories must be
implemented and be taken into action. Persons in authority must formulate the said policies to guide the users in the usage of the computer facilities.

Therefore, if we cooperate and help hand-in-hand in following the steps towards green computing, we can achieve our objectives and at the same time we are building a better
environment towards the next generations to come.We are all imputable on every actions we take. Remember we are all caretakers of our mother EARTH.

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Franz Cie B. Suico

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PostSubject: Assignment 4   Mon Jul 13, 2009 12:36 pm

Site 3 URL's that talk's about "Green Campus Computing" and suggest ways the university can adopt this concept.

First, let me define what is green computing. Green computing is the practice of using computing resources efficiently. The CIO portfolio has launched an initiative to begin 'greening' the IT infrastructure at the University in order to create a more sustainable provision of IT services that do not harm the environment or use unnecessary resources.

Now, let me site 3 URL that talk's about it and ways that they did for applying the "Green Campus Computing" concept.

The first one is from the site http://www.colby.edu/about_cs/campusinfo/eag/projects/pag.cfm

Green Computing Personal Action Guide study

Computers have fast become one of the largest consumers of electricity on college campuses across the country. The EPA has estimated that using the ‘sleep mode’ on equipped computers nationwide would reduce their energy use by 60% to 70%. This could save enough electricity each year to power Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine, cut electric bills by $2 billion, and reduce CO2 emissions by the equivalent of 5 million cars. If the Colby community turned its printers and computers off overnight and on weekends, over $42,000 would be saved annually.
What Can You Do?

1. Turn off your computer! A modest amount of turning on and off will not harm the equipment. Leaving it on all night and all weekend wastes energy. If the computer will be idle for more than 16 minutes, it would consume less energy to turn it off and on again - this does not damage the computer or shorten its lifespan.
2. Group your computer activities and try to do them during one or two parts of the day, leaving the computer off at other times. Break the habit of switching the machine on every morning.
3. Turn the monitor off. Screen savers consume as much electricity as the monitor does when in active use.
4. Buy only “Energy Star” computers and accessories. What’s Energy Star? Visit - www.energystar.gov/products
5. Set your computer to ‘sleep’ or ‘stand by’ when not in use for a certain period of time. Consult your control panel for setting options.
6. Don’t turn your printer on until you are ready to print. Printers consume energy even when idling.

Second, is the site from http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=23&Itemid=40

PUTTING YOUR COMPUTER TO SLEEP scratch

When you're not using your computer, you can save energy by putting it to "sleep." When your computer is in sleep, it's turned on but in a low power mode. It takes less time for a computer to wake up from sleep than it does for the computer to start up after being turned off.

You can put your computer to sleep right away by choosing Apple menu > Sleep. You can also choose to put the computer to sleep automatically when your computer has been inactive for a specified amount of time. You can also set only the display to sleep. If your computer is in the middle of a task that you want to let finish while you are away (for example, burning a DVD), you should set only the display to sleep.

Lastly, the site from http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm

Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money flower

Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.

Those were a few of the ideas discussed last week at a conference, "Greening the Internet Economy," that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event, held by the University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.

Many of the participants emphasized the importance of systems that could more intelligently measure energy use on the campus. In recent years, colleges have been hurt by the rising costs of powering and cooling their data centers, in part because those costs are difficult to measure and poorly understood (The Chronicle, January 9).

At San Diego, researchers have started work on hardware to help colleges and other organizations understand how to make their servers more efficient. The device, called the GreenLight Instrument, will deploy sensors and software to measure the energy use, humidity, and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Data Center, a popular, self-contained complex of servers.

The goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption, said Thomas A. DeFanti, principal investigator on the project and a senior research strategist at the university's California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology.

"Right now there isn't enough information for somebody to make a definitive decision: Where do I save my money? Do I eliminate disks in my computers, or do I stop them? Do I use more RAM or less RAM?" said Mr. DeFanti. "Nobody has detailed information on this."

Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money

Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.

Those were a few of the ideas discussed last week at a conference, "Greening the Internet Economy," that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event, held by the University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.

Many of the participants emphasized the importance of systems that could more intelligently measure energy use on the campus. In recent years, colleges have been hurt by the rising costs of powering and cooling their data centers, in part because those costs are difficult to measure and poorly understood (The Chronicle, January 9).

At San Diego, researchers have started work on hardware to help colleges and other organizations understand how to make their servers more efficient. The device, called the GreenLight Instrument, will deploy sensors and software to measure the energy use, humidity, and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Data Center, a popular, self-contained complex of servers.

The goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption, said Thomas A. DeFanti, principal investigator on the project and a senior research strategist at the university's California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology.

"Right now there isn't enough information for somebody to make a definitive decision: Where do I save my money? Do I eliminate disks in my computers, or do I stop them? Do I use more RAM or less RAM?" said Mr. DeFanti. "Nobody has detailed information on this."

Aiming for Precision

Intelligent measuring systems like Greenlight should be extended to allow engineers to more precisely determine how to use energy, said Gary L. Baldwin, director of special projects at the University of California's Citris program. For example, he said, operators at a data center could direct cool air only where the facility is generating the most heat.

Another idea that shows promise, participants said, is to supply computers directly with local DC power. Computers generally use direct current, but the public electricity grid typically supplies alternating current, and 30 percent of the electricity can be lost in the conversion of one form to the other.

Some colleges have started projects to power their computers directly from solar cells or other sources of DC power on the campus, avoiding the energy loss altogether. At San Diego, administrators hope to build a "power ring" that will supply computers across the campus with DC power, said Mr. DeFanti.

The rethinking of how to supply campus power is part of a broader effort to "divorce ourselves from the electrical grid," said Bill St. Arnaud, chief research officer at Canarie Inc., a Canadian computer-networking organization. Power-transmission lines lose a significant amount of energy over long distances, he said, which means that supplying a campus with energy from faraway power plant can be inefficient.

A better strategy, Mr. St. Arnaud said, is to build campus data centers next to a renewable source of power, like a solar plant. High-speed optical transmission lines, he said, would ensure that the computers would seem "as close as next door."

For my suggestion on how the university can adopt this concept. Simply by analyzing the situation of the university. I think we all know that now a days the mother earth is campaigning in Global Warming that causes the ice in the antarctic to melt and loosing the only home of polar bears. Others are the smoke coming out in cars, factories, and etc., that causes pollution and a big factor in making the global warming worse. To simplify, the university need to simulate first in order for them to know what best way in implementing the concept. After they already simulated and gathered enough information on how they will implement it in the university then that's the time for the implementation. Some cases if you don't analyze the situation it's hard to implement these concept specially in a school/university. So in order to avoid conflicts they need to analyze, simulate, then implement if all things are reconsidered. For me, the university really needs to apply these concept in order to save energy, money, and helped the environment by means of conserving energy.


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PostSubject: AssiGnMent 4   Mon Jul 13, 2009 3:36 pm

About Green Computing

Green computing, the study and practice of efficient and eco-friendly computing resources, is now under the attention of not only environmental organizations, but also businesses from other industries. In recent years, companies in the computer industry have come to realize that going green is in their best interest, both in terms of public relations and reduced costs. http://thefutureofthings.com/articles/1003/green-computing.html

1.http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html
According to this site, the growing use of computers on campus has caused a dramatic increase in energy consumption, putting negative pressure on CU’s budget and the environment. Each year more and more computers are purchased and put to use, but it’s not just the number of computers that is driving energy consumption upward. The way that we use computers also adds to the increasing energy burden.

Research reveals that most personal desktop computers are not being used the majority of the time they are running and many personal computers nationwide are needlessly left on continuously. Every time we leave computers or lights on we waste electricity. Burning fossil fuels generates most of our electricity and it also emits pollutants, sulfur, and carbon dioxide into the air. These emissions can cause respiratory disease, smog, acid rain and global climate change.

The most basic energy conservation strategies for any type of equipment are the following:
• Turn off your computer and/or peripherals when they are not in use. Turning on and off will not harm the equipment.
• Don’t run computers continuously unless they are in use continuously.
• Turn off at night and on weekends
• Look for ways to reduce the amount of time your computer is on without adversely affecting your productivity.

2.http://www.beloit.edu/isr/greencomputing.php
According to this site, everyday energy is wasted by computers and monitors that are left on when not in use. By simply putting the hard drive and monitor to sleep after a short period of inactivity, huge energy savings can be realized. The computer should wake up with a quick click of the mouse or by pressing a key on the keyboard. In some cases, you will need to press the power button briefly to wake the computer up. Also, be sure to shut down your computer before leaving for the day and over weekends. Use this handy calculator to get an idea of how much energy and money can be saved.

3.) http://www.uoregon.edu/~recycle/Conservation_computing_text.htm

According to this site, in order to make sure the computer you buy is environmentally friendly, ask if the manufacturer has adopted these Silicon Principles, and ask about what steps have been taken to implement them.
. The Silicon Principles include:
• Efforts at reducing the use of toxic chemicals
• the development of educational and safety programs
• Cooperation with local communities
• ensuring that workers aren't displaced by technological or economic shifts
• Control of technological innovation by civil Can, not military, actors
• requiring subcontractors and suppliers obey the same policies as large corporations, including international suppliers
• establishing a life-cycle approach to all computer manufacturing (which means that the factory is responsible for ultimate disposal of the computer), to internalize costs and guarantee safe disposal

All these sites tell us the growing use of computers exploding around the world. The university can adopt this concept in many ways. First, turn off your computer when not being used, and only turn on printers and other peripherals when you need them. Buy Energy Star compliant equipment, and ask if the manufacturer follows the Silicon Valley Principles in dealing with toxic chemicals. Second, enhanced work environments such as campus computer lab space and office work space with reduced noise pollution and eye strain from traditional CRTs. Third, a reduction in all operating costs by reducing supplies such as toner, ink and paper. Fourth, upgrade the computer rather than throwing
it away and buying a new one. Lastly, give your old computers to charity, or have a recycling service deal with your really archaic computers. Through this the university uses computers as a tool to protect the environment. But all this things start from our self to be more responsible in what we are doing if it is good or bad to the environment.

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kate karen rasonable

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PostSubject: ..green campus computing..   Mon Jul 13, 2009 4:21 pm

Green Campus Computing

As I’ve traveled through the world of internet, I found these 3 sites that cater green computing.

http://searchdatacenter.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid80_gci1246959,00.html
http://www.isc.uoguelph.ca/documents/061211GreenComputingFinalReport2006_000.pdf
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_computing

The first URL gives the definition of green computing as the environmentally responsible use of computers and related resources. Such practices include the implementation of energy-efficient central processing units (CPUs), servers and peripherals as well as reduced resource consumption and proper disposal of electronic waste (e-waste). As an IT student, I am well aware that the computers of today are among the most commonly used of electronic devices, with people employing them every day for work, research, entertainment, shopping, and many more stuff. So I do believe that it’s really important to understand how they affect our environment, especially since computers account for a relatively large portion of our electrical consumption.
This assignment asks about “green campus computing”. Thus, the main concerns are for the people inside a campus or university. The University of Southeastern Philippines (USeP) has computing laboratories comprising of multiple computers. In addition, faculty members have computers in their offices and staff personnel have computers on their desk. If these computers are turned on simultaneously, energy consumption and of course the effect of this scenario to the global warming would definitely be immense. Moreover, there are a lot of simple ways we could do to help conserve energy and of course to help prevent global warming. Just like preventing the use of screen savers since screen saver programs were designed to prevent burn-in of the phosphorescent coating on the inside of a CRT screen, thus giving it a longer life. So to help save energy, let us learn to turn off our monitors whenever it’s inactive or not in use. Others say that turning computer off and on reduces the life of the hard drive but this is just true for early computer equipment (pre-early 1990s), but in practice turning your computer off and on will not have any noticeable effect on the hard drive. Thus, helping the environment through conserving energy doesn’t harm anything or anybody. Another thing that as students we could do is by using other sides of paper or to print on for a draft copy. In such way, we can save paper very effectively and thus help save the trees that re being cut to produce large amount of papers. A cautionary note for users of laser printers: microscopic bits of toner can flake off from the printed side of the paper as it goes through the printer the second time. This toner can build up inside the printer over time and may shorten the printer’s life.
Another thing that can help us as well as the institution we’re in is through recycling. Recycling can also help reduce the impact that computers have on energy usage. We and our university can recycle the following:

1.Old computers. Recycling or reusing electronics is an important environmental concern. Properly disposing of computer helps prevent mercury, cadmium, lead, and hazardous chemicals from leaching into our environment.

2.Ink and toner cartridges. Cartridges can be refilled, re-manufactured, and re-used. Many re-manufacturers will take used cartridge, refurbish it, and refill it. Re-manufactured toner and ink cartridges are considerable less than what they would cost new.

3.Paper. Whenever possible, use post-consumer recycled-content paper. The cost and quality differences of recycled to virgin paper today is negligible. And remember to re-use blank sides of used paper for inkjet printing and scratch paper.

I also found this pdf file that study about simple ways that an institution do to help our environment. I think this can also be applied on our beloved university, the University of Southeastern Philippines (USeP).

Campus Awareness Program – Raising awareness is the first step in changing practice and behaviors. To properly define and develop an effective campus awareness campaign regarding green computing principles and practices, the target audiences (IT staff, management, student/faculty/staff users) should be surveyed to determine current awareness of, participation in, and barriers to participation in current e-waste and energy reduction programs. The program will be lead by the Sustainability Coordinator but will require cross campus collaboration with IT personnel, campus communications, purchasing agents, and physical resources. The campaign will employ social marketing theory based on persuasion and motivation techniques to affect both short and long-term changes in behaviors and also to foster collaboration and participation in the program and development of new standards, policies and practices.

Energy Conservation Strategies and Practices – A campus energy conservation plan and strategy for computing needs to be developed in collaboration with university IT personnel and Physical Resources. Current power management configuration, departmental requirements, and energy utilization must be determined in order to set standards, benchmark progress and to ensure user needs are met while energy is conserved.

Computer Procurement – The establishment of a green procurement directive for computers would enable the creation of effective purchasing policies that ensure environmental criteria are applied to tenders and contracts regarding the assessment of manufacturers and vendors, service agreements, and endoflifecycle product management.

With proper dissemination of information and implementation of these processes, we could definitely help not just our pockets but most important our environment.
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Ida Karla Duguran

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Mon Jul 13, 2009 10:58 pm



Green Campus Computing

Arrow 1. http://www.grist.org/article/rebooting-campus-computing/

This article talks about the UC(University of California) system greens electronics program. According to this article, the UC system got a little greener by passing an “Environmental Sustainability Policy” that includes provisions on energy, global warming, waste, and eco-friendly electronics purchasing.

Same with this school, our university can adopt their practices by following what they are adopting too. Some of these practices are the following:
• adopting guidelines for buying greener electronics
• finding better ways to dispose of e-waste
• initiating “takeback” recycling

Their school system will only buy products registered under the Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool, which computer equipment according to a set of environmental standards such as reduction in harmful chemicals, designs that are more easily recycled, and product longevity. I don’t know if we have this in our country but I guess we have our equivalent value for this. They also have integrated a "takeback" requirement in their purchasing contracts that will force electronic manufacturers to take care of used products, and they have also created criteria for responsible recycling for those vendors. This criteria includes a ban on both exporting the e-waste to developing nations and using prison labor in there country.

Arrow 2. http://www.isc.uoguelph.ca/documents/061211GreenComputingFinalReport2006_000.pdf

This url is about Campus Computing and the Environment which is a Report of the Green Computing Task Group to the Information Services Committee(ISC) that identifies green computing policies and best practices elsewhere and benchmark the University of Guelph against these practices, recommends a campus awareness program, identifies energy conservation strategies and practices, examines the need for and nature of computing procurement guidelines, and identifies equipment disposal procedures.

The University of Guelph should take pride in its advanced E-Waste Disposal program and the high level of participation on campus. The well crafted Policy on Environmental Protection could be strengthened and enhanced by the further development of sustainability policies and possibly the establishment of a monitoring board. However, the top priorities identified by the task force involve education, assessment, and collaboration in the establishment of environmental awareness and practice on campus with regards to “green computing” throughout the entire lifecycle of the products.

Top Priorities:

Campus Awareness Program
1) Conduct a survey of the different target audiences on campus to:
a) Gauge awareness of and participation in current energy reduction practices and e-waste management practices.
b) Identify barriers to participation in the above practices.
2) Develop campaign based on social marketing theory, moving beyond information provision to motivation and persuasion techniques, identifying effective shortterm incentives and longterm behaviour modification strategies.
a) Develop a media strategy in conjunction with IT and Communications & Public Affairs (to be developed by Sustainability Coordinator).
b) Ensure campaign informs campus IT professionals of the support and services available through the Sustainability Coordinator and Purchasing in implementation of green computing solutions.
3) Measure and evaluate the success of the awareness program and the adoption of conservation or procurement practices by developing indicators and publicize the results.

Energy Conservation Strategies and Practices
1) Survey current power management policies and practices across campus.
2) Develop a plan, with IT personnel, to reduce the energy consumption of computers across campus.
3) Identify standard practices for implementing an energy reduction plan.
4) Coordinate participation of IT in an energy reduction plan with campus environmental policies and campus awareness programs.
5) Work with Physical Resources on the development of an energy consumption measurement program and energy indicators that break down energy consumption in a way that is easily communicable and relevant to the campus.

Computer Procurement
1) Establish standards and benchmarks with which to define a green purchasing policy for computers.
2) Define Purchasing policy complete with purpose, scope and procedures.
a) Developing a green procurement directive.
b) Construct terms and conditions for future tenders and contracts.
c) Incorporate labeling programs into a university green computing procurement initiative. Adopt standards issued by ecological standards associations and
identify their labeling programs, i.e., Energy Star, EnerGuide, Green Seal, etc.
d) Communicate procurement information resources within the University community via Purchasing Service’s website and provide resource links as
appropriate. Incorporate training and education of new environmental criteria and processes into existing client training program.
3) Report / update purchase activity in support of green initiatives, including progress to
date to Sustainability Coordinator for incorporation into campus awareness program.


Arrow 3. http://www.it.utah.edu/leadership/green/index.html - Green Computing at the U of U.

This site is the University of Utah’s overview about Green Computing. This discusses some techniques and best practices for End Users of Green computing that are easy to incorporate.

With a number of desktop computers in use at the University, there is a great amount of power used and a great amount of both paper and electronic waste produced. Some simple solutions can help to reduce the impact of these deployments.

Paper Waste
• Print as little as possible. Review and modify documents on the screen and use print preview. Minimize the number of hard copies and paper drafts you make. Instead of printing, save information to disks, or USB memory sticks.
• Recycle waste paper, have a recycle bin at each community printer and copier location.
• Buy and use recycled paper in your printers and copiers. From an environmental point of view, the best recycled paper is 100 percent post-consumer recycled content.
• Save e-mail whenever possible and avoid needless printing of e-mail messages.
• Use e-mail instead of faxes or send faxes directly from your computer to eliminate the need for a hard copy. When you must fax using hard copies, save paper using a "sticky" fax address note and not a cover sheet.
• On larger documents, use smaller font sizes (consistent with readability) to save paper.
• If your printer prints a test page whenever it is turned on, disable this unnecessary feature.
• Before recycling paper, which has print on only one side, set it aside for use as scrap paper or for printing drafts.
• When documents are printed or copied, use double-sided printing and copying. If possible, use the multiple pages per sheet option on printer properties.
• When general information-type documents must be shared within an office, try circulating them instead of making an individual copy for each person. Even better, make the document electronically available to the audience and display it on a projector.

Electronic Waste
• Use the campus network where possible to transfer files. This avoids the need to write CDs or DVDs or use floppy diskettes.
• Use USB memory sticks instead of CDs, DVDs, or floppies.
• Use re-writable CDs and DVDs.
• There are hopes of the University Recycling program addressing e-waste in the near future

For Power Management, by using power wisely and enabling the power management features in your computer's operating system, you can save energy while ensuring that it's available to you when you need it.
Please consider the following:
• Turn off your computer and/or peripherals when they are not in use. Turning on and off will not harm the equipment. If you use a desktop printer, consider leaving it off when not in use.
• Don't run computers continuously unless they are in use continuously.
• Turn your computer off or set it to hibernate at night and on weekends.
• Disable screen savers on LCD monitors/displays - these are no longer necessary and use a lot of energy.
• Look for ways to reduce the amount of time your computer is using energy without adversely affecting your productivity. Follow the simple steps below to turn on computer and monitor/display power management features for Windows and Mac operating systems.

Energy Saving Settings
Energy saving modes can go by many different names, including Stand By (Microsoft Windows 95-XP), Sleep (Mac OS-X)/ (Windows Vista), and Suspend (Linux). When placed in this energy saving mode, aside from the RAM which is required to restore the machine's state, the computer attempts to cut power to all unneeded parts of the machine. Because of the large power savings, most laptops automatically enter this mode when the computer is running on batteries and the lid is closed.


Idea Please make use of these best practices in order to develop a practice that best fits your individual needs. These suggestions are intended for users who manage their own computer. cheers



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mayraflordurango

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PostSubject: MIS- Assingment 4 (Green Campus Computing)   Mon Jul 13, 2009 11:10 pm

Find three(3) URL's that talk's about "green campus computing" and suggest ways how the university can adopt this concept.


Razz Short-lived Definition and Clarity about “green campus computing” Razz


Green Campus Computing used is the positive (or least negative) relationship between the physical computer and its impact to the environments in which it moves through during its journey from cradle to grave.

Green campus computing is the study and practice of using computing resources efficiently. The primary objective of such a program is to account for the triple bottom line, an expanded spectrum of values and criteria for measuring organizational (and societal) success. The goals are similar to green chemistry; reduce the use of hazardous materials, maximize energy efficiency during the product's lifetime, and promote recyclability or biodegradability of defunct products and factory waste.

Modern IT systems rely upon a complicated mix of people, networks and hardware; as such, a green computing initiative must be systemic in nature, and address increasingly sophisticated problems. Elements of such a solution may comprise items such as end user satisfaction, management restructuring, regulatory compliance, disposal of electronic waste, telecommuting, virtualization of server resources, energy use, thin client solutions, and return on investment (ROI).

The imperative for companies to take control of their power consumption, for technology and more generally, therefore remains acute. One of the most effective power management tools available in 2009 may still be simple, plain, common sense.

In addition, Green campus computing is also an environmentally responsible use of computers and related resources. Such practices include the implementation of energy-efficient central processing units (CPUs), servers and peripherals as well as reduced resource consumption and proper disposal of electronic waste (e-waste).


Basketball Three(3) URL's that talk's about "green campus computing"Basketball


bounce *Terminal Servers bounce


Terminal servers have also been used in green computing methods. When using terminal servers, users connect to a central server; all of the computing is done at the server level but the end user experiences the operating system. These can be combined with thin clients, which use up to 1/8 the amount of energy of a normal workstation, resulting in a decrease of energy costs and consumption. There has been an increase in using terminal services with thin clients to create virtual labs. Examples of terminal server software include Terminal Services for Windows, the Aqua Connect Terminal Server for Mac, and the Linux Terminal Server Project (LTSP) for the Linux operating system.

bounce *Video Card bounce


A fast GPU may be the largest power consumer in a computer.
Energy efficient display options include:
• No video card - use a shared terminal, shared thin client, or desktop sharing software if display required.
• Use motherboard video output - typically low 3D performance and low power.
• Select a GPU based on average wattage or performance per watt.

bounce *Telecommuting bounce


Teleconferencing and telepresence technologies are often implemented in green computing initiatives. The advantages are many; increased worker satisfaction, reduction of greenhouse gas emissions related to travel, and increased profit margins as a result of lower overhead costs for office space, heat, lighting, etc.
Voice over IP (VoIP) reduces the telephony wiring infrastructure by sharing the existing Ethernet copper. VoIP and phone extension mobility also made Hot desking and more practical.



lol! Ways how the university can adopt to this concept...... by adopting the following practices and notions! lol!


Some common green computing practices include turning off the monitor when it's not in use or using more energy efficient monitors like LCDs instead of the traditional CRT monitors, volunteer computing or file sharing practices, virtualization of servers, using more energy efficient and less noisy cooling systems (like using liquid cooling systems instead of the conventional heat sinks and fans), temperature maintenance and regulation to reduce thermal shock wear and tear to computer parts, and increased online security measures through the use of firewalls, anti spyware and anti virus programs to reduce the increasing amount of Waste on the Internet and on other networks.

[center] The essential elements of this manner of living are the promotion and maintenance of industrial, commercial, and residential development strategies that lead to a better environment in the future; one sustained by stable, healthful communities within a clean, safe environment.

The work habits of computer users and businesses among companies and universities can be modified to minimize adverse impact on the global environment. Here are some concepts that can be taken:

* Power-down the CPU and all peripherals during extended periods of inactivity.
* Try to do computer-related tasks during contiguous, intensive blocks of time, leaving hardware off at other times.
* Power-up and power-down energy-intensive peripherals such as laser printers according to need.
* Use liquid-crystal-display (LCD) monitors rather than cathode-ray-tube (CRT) monitors.
* Use notebook computers rather than desktop computers whenever possible.
* Use the power-management features to turn off hard drives and displays after several minutes of inactivity.
* Minimize the use of paper and properly recycle waste paper.
* Dispose of e-waste according to federal, state and local regulations.
* Employ alternative energy sources for computing workstations, servers, networks and data centers.

Then there are still plenty of servers around that are very lowly utilized. Those are the ones to consolidate first. Really, just looking at the oldest technology first because they always use much more power is always a good first step.


cyclops Related issue cyclops


Operating system issues


Microsoft has been heavily criticized for producing operating systems that, out of the box, are not energy efficient. Due to Microsoft's dominance of the huge desktop operating system market this may have resulted in more energy waste than any other initiative by other vendors. Microsoft claim to have improved this in Vista, though the claim is disputed. This problem has been compounded because Windows versions before Vista did not allow power management features to be configured centrally by a system administrator. This has meant that most organizations have been unable to improve this situation.
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Alfredo V. Ala-an

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PostSubject: ASSINGMENT 4   Tue Jul 14, 2009 12:02 am

Here are some sites talking about the green campus.

1. cheers

Title: Negros Occidental to launch green campus

visit:arrow: : http://www.sunstar.com.ph/bacolod/negros-occidental-launch-green-campus

Idea "Penro is urging everybody to join the activity by bringing in and selling recyclable materials such as newspapers, clean plastic cellophanes, plastic containers scrap paper, cartons, empty bottles, tin cans, aluminum containers, PC monitors, used ink/toner cartridges and junk appliances to said fair."

"May pera sa basura!"

2. Solar Generation - Pilipinas cheers

Title: Green Campus Launching - from 1998 to the Present projects

visit:arrow: : http://solargenerationyouth.multiply.com/photos/album/228/Green_Campus_Launching_-_from_1998_to_the_Present_projects

Idea "The Green Campus was then born on the month July and it was agreed by all departments to immediately implement the project proposal which was endorsed by SolarGeneration and re-aligned by the Green Campus Committee (created during the first meeting) based on the campus requirements and capacity. The project started through information education communication campaign of the Simple Lang Save the Climate toolkit (switch-off, Unplug and light up efficiently) in the university were in-charge committee was tasked to execute their role while the college of Engineering conducts the energy audit to be submitted on the agreed time-frame.

By the end of the month the University presented the partial report education campaign generated savings (August 2008): Php 58,774.10 and presented the energy audit report which was then conducted by the Engineering Department.

Now the University is planning the use of energy generated from Renewable source (Solar) for their electricity consumption and the use of sustainable public transport which is the electric jeepney.
"

3.cheers

Title: 12 Steps Towards Sustainability

visit:arrow: : http://www.easternct.edu/sustainenergy/colleges_n_uni/home_colleges_n_uni.html

Idea "Universities have an obligation to operate in a manner that is ecologically and socially sound, as well as economically viable. To do this they need to act in a sustainable manner considering all three when making planning and operational decisions. Universities are being asked to support the regional, national and worldwide climate change efforts. This includes actions to educate, lower emissions, reduce dependence on fossil fuels. Organizations are also internally driven to reduce unnecessary cost for maintenance and energy. Universities should become "Learning Laboratories" for the future citizens and leaders of the world."

"It's not easy being green!"


[b]My views!


*Recycling
- Recycling materials can less the hazardous effects in our society. In our school, I can say that recycling materials should be adopt because as what i saw in the laboratory room there are lots of unused monitors/keyboards/mouse. Selling this waste can benefit some money and make use of this money for beautification of our school.
*Solar Energy
- As what i can see in our school, it is much better if we can have more solar energy producing things because the more this solar energy things it can really save electricity consumption by making use of this solar energy. Saving electricity also save money. In our school if we can save more electricity we can earn also more money and that money we could divert it to the improvement in our school like in the beautification or other things. To save also energy we should also adopt ways in conserving energy and it should begin in the facilitators or staffs in our school and should implement a strict compliance for this matter.


***end***
(^_^)..cocoi™

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Jethro Alburo Querubin

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PostSubject: Green Campus Computing   Tue Jul 14, 2009 12:27 am

Green Campus Computing is an idea of saving energy and/or being environmentally friendly without compromising the technology. As technology arises, we cannot deny the fact that it also requires, higher capacity, graphics, power and etc. One of the things to solve is to make a way in order to save and/or conserve energy.

Here are links about green campus computing:

1. http://www.uoguelph.ca/atguelph/07-02-14/newscomputing.shtml

This site talks about awareness campaign that will give idea on the users on how to be environmentally friendly with the technologies. Here are some of the things that they will implement which is very applicable to our school. A good start to help the students, faculty and staff on how save energy and ensure clean computer components:

* Awareness campaign. Focus groups will look at awareness of energy use and conservation in computing and potential barriers to green computing. The campaign will offer ideas to students, faculty and staff on basic computing practices, from reminders about turning off monitors to use of power-saving features and settings.
* Energy conservation strategies. A survey in January of information technology managers across campus yielded information about current power-management practices among computer users. That information will be used to develop standard practices and power-consumption settings designed to save energy. Those procedures, involving University IT staff and Physical Resources, are expected to be ready for implementation by spring.


2. http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm

Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.

- Instead of an AC power, replace it with DC power. The university or school may buy a solar-powered generator to produce an energy for the use of the computers. In this idea, we can lessen the electricity but still efficient and sustainable.

3. http://thejournal.com/articles/2009/06/30/new-version-of-print-management-software-aims-to-help-cut-costs.aspx


"The idea is to find, in any project, the closest, most perfect balance of social,financial, and environmental components."
-- Linda Petee, Delta College

Netop has released PrintLimit Pro 9.4, an update to the company's print management software that's geared toward more efficient printing and helping school environments save on three heavily used commodities: paper, ink, and time.

The key features aimed at saving money and time are load balancing, which allows network users with heavy print traffic to spread a print load over a large group of member printers, and "Find-Me" printing, which allows for intelligent routing of print jobs to release stations at large sites. Additional new functions of version 9.4 include:

* Centralized monitoring and reporting of toner levels for all printers on network;
* Support for 64-bit Linux installations;
* 10 new reports covering printer usage and environmental impact; and
* Improved scalability, allowing for support of tens of thousands of user clients, even on standard 32-bit server hardware.

This is a good technology which we can adopt in our school making a centralize printer for the whole university to lessen costs and expenses on inks cartridges and papers.

Lines I got from this url: http://www.campustechnology.com/Articles/2009/05/01/Green-Campus-P2.aspx

>>But unlike many schools of comparable size with various, uncoordinated, environmentally conscious programs in place, Delta's green plans are part of an overall strategy to take the institution green-- including a strategic mission to take Delta as close to carbon neutrality as possible. And if Delta can make such missions reality, what's to stop any other American college or university from achieving the same goals?

"The idea is to find, in any project, the closest, most perfect balance of social,financial, and environmental components."
-- Linda Petee, Delta College

**I included this to challenge us to uniquely and creatively make our ideas in adopting a "green campus computing" in such a way that will be more applicable and efficient to the students.
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vanessa may caneda

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PostSubject: Green Campus Computing..   Tue Jul 14, 2009 12:39 am

What is Green Campus Computing?

Green Campus Computing is a practice of using computer resources efficiently. The growing use of computers on campus has caused a dramatic increase in energy consumption. Most personal desktop computers are not being used the majority of the time they are running and many personal computers nationwide are needlessly left on continuously. Every time we leave computers or lights on we waste electricity. Burning fossil fuels generates most of our electricity and it also emits pollutants, sulfur, and carbon dioxide into the air. These emissions can cause respiratory disease, smog, acid rain and global climate change.

Here are some ways to reduced energy consumption:

  • Eliminate Screen Savers
  • Turn off computers when not in use
  • Printers must be used only when needed
  • Avoid use laser printers because it consume more energy
  • Unplug Cellphone chargers when you're not charging
When you're not using your computer, you can save energy by putting it to "sleep." When your computer is in sleep, it's turned on but in a low power mode. It takes less time for a computer to wake up from sleep than it does for the computer to start up after being turned off. You can also choose to put the computer to sleep automatically when your computer has been inactive for a specified amount of time. You can also set only the display to sleep. If your computer is in the middle of a task that you want to let finish while you are away you should set only the display to sleep.

To implement this idea on my school, University of Southeastern Philppines, it would be much better if we are responsible enough to help in conserving energy. All the administrative staff as well as students must be aware of the environmental issues that computers bring unto us since we are the primary users of those devices. We have to be vigilant of the effects of those issues since we are responsible on it. The idea of turning off the computers when not in used is a big help. Avoid using screen savers since images that appear on monitor within 5 minutes means wasting of energy. We must understand the concepts of green campus computing, its advantages and effects in many aspects of life. If we students as well as the staff in our school is properly oriented with the purpose of green campus computing, then it would be very easy for us to get involved in conserving energy and protecting the environment. Cooperation is badly needed to achieve the goal of saving the environment. Likewise, it would be a lot better if the faculty will imposed strict implementation inside our computer laboratories so that students will definitely follow. It is also good if the school administration will have further study in using the technology efficient and effectively to fit the current computing lifestyle of our university. Moreover, we students must follow those simple implementation so that we can help in conserving and saving energy at the same time in protecting our environment. The benefit of having a good environment is not only for our own good but also to those in our future generation.

References:
http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html
http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogsection&id=7&Itemid=39
http://www2.iath.virginia.edu/mgk3k/enwr/ccs.html


Last edited by vanessa may caneda on Wed Jul 15, 2009 11:52 pm; edited 2 times in total
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John Paul Pulido

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PostSubject: The Green Campus Computing   Tue Jul 14, 2009 1:25 am

Green computing, the study and practice of efficient and eco-friendly computing resources, is now under the attention of not only environmental organizations, but also businesses from other industries. In recent years, companies in the computer industry have come to realize that going green is in their best interest, both in terms of public relations and reduced costs. This article will take a look at several green initiatives currently under way in the computer industry, as well as issues that have been raised regarding these initiatives.

Here are some articles related to Green Campus Computing with their corresponding URL:

Green Technology Parameters for Schools

There have been many initiatives taken by state and federal governments in this regard. In fact, a trend has emerged across the globe, wherein schools that accomplish creation of campuses that are able to achieve certain energy-saving figures and follow environmental-design recommendations, are awarded points and financial grants. Some of the common features used during the evaluation of green technology in a school campus are:
•Amount of natural ventilation and daylight allowed in school building interiors to reduce energy consumption
•Utilization of recyclable building materials
Ex: Use of eco-friendly and sustainable structural material like asphalt for school courtyards and recycling of construction-related and maintenance-created waste materials
•Steps taken to directly reduce electrical energy consumption such as use of solar panels/lamps and use of sunlight reflectors during day-time
•Landscaping to provide more shaded areas and decrease the use of electrically-powered cooling appliances
•Recycling of water used on the school campus to help conserve water usage
Mutually Beneficial — Integrating green technology eventually leads to creation of more sustainable energy-saving practices. Schools have a huge financial benefit from adhering to green technology, as it helps to reduce the running/maintenance costs of a school campus. So, using eco-friendly technologies is of mutual benefit to both the school administrators and the environment. Thus, the perception of incorporating green technology being economically-unfeasible is absolutely false.
Note: most schools that have adopted more Green functionalities have noticed one common trend — the initial costs that are borne to introduce these eco-friendly measures are soon outweighed by the benefits that begin to surface rather immediately.

http://www.brighthub.com/environment/green-computing/articles/31883.aspx


Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money
By JOSH KELLER

Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.
Those were a few of the ideas discussed last week at a conference, "Greening the Internet Economy," that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event, held by the University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.

http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm

Going green; Computing.

THE people, places and things inside Second Life, a thriving online world with millions of residents, may be imaginary--but the power consumption of the computers that maintain the illusion is all too real. Nicholas Carr, a business writer and blogger, recently worked out that each of the 15,000 or so residents logged in at any one time consumes electricity as a result of their activities in the virtual world almost as fast as the average inhabitant of Brazil does in real life. Second Life's residents, Mr Carr concluded, "don't have bodies, but they do leave footprints."

http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-159977229.html

Ways to adopt the different concepts:

•Turn off computer when it is not used
•Employ alternative energy sources for computing workstations, servers, networks and data centers.
•Use liquid-crystal-display (LCD) monitors rather than cathode-ray-tube (CRT) monitors.
•Establish rules and regulations in which to define a green purchasing policy for computers.
•Recycle used papers
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Jovanne Nick Cacayan

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Tue Jul 14, 2009 2:13 am

Green computing is a must for us nowadays, especially in saving our environment. We are encourage in using and utilizing our resources more efficiently as a response to the call of the mother nature. In our generation, computers are widely used and in this case it also contribute to some factors that destroys our environment. It is our initiative to save and conserve our resources, and we can do this in our own little way in using computers.

http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html


Energy Efficient Computing

Here are some tested suggestions that may make it possible for you to reduce your computer energy consumption by 80 percent or more while still retaining most or all productivity and other benefits of your computer system, including network connectivity.

Screen savers save no energy
If screen saver images appear on your monitor for more than 5 minutes, you are wasting energy! Screen saver programs may save the phosphors in your monitor screen, but this is not really a concern with newer monitors, especially LCD screens. And they do not save any energy.

A screen saver that displays moving images causes your monitor to consume as much as electricity as it does when in active use. These screen saver programs also involve system interaction with your CPU that results in additional energy consumption. A blank screen saver is slightly better but even that only reduces monitor energy consumption by a few percent.

Enable power management features
Thanks to the U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA), personal computer systems purchased today can be easy on energy. These “Energy Star” computers and monitors can be programmed to automatically “power-down” to a low power state when they are not being used. These efficiency gains can be achieved without any sacrifice in computing performance.

The EPA has estimated that providing computers with “sleep mode” reduces their energy use by 60 to 70 percent – and ultimately could save enough electricity each year to power Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine, cut electric bills by $2 billion, and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by the equivalent of 5 million cars...



http://www.plantops.umich.edu/utilities/energy_management/computing/

We hear about it every night on the news: the world is in an energy crisis, greenhouse gas emissions are on the rise, global warming is a serious problem. You’ve tried to be a part of a solution by recycling, carpooling when possible, and observing ozone action days. But have you ever thought about your computer? Just by changing a few simple actions, you can help improve energy management, increase energy efficiency, and reduce waste...


http://www.fullerton.edu/it/news/Publications/Green_Computing_Guide.pdf

There are 3 stages in the life cycle of an electronic product –
(1) the decision to purchase a product, (2) use and maintenance
of the product, and (3) its end life. At each stage, you can make
decisions that lessen the environmental impact and promote
better use of resources.

Efficient Computer Operation

The most effective way to conserve energy is to turn your computer off when you aren’t using it. Beyond this obvious solution:

* Ensure power management features are enabled in your operating system. For step-by-step instructions on your Windows or Mac system, or check out the power management guide on the Energy Star website.
* If possible, check that your standby/sleep mode is set to “S3” or Suspend-to-RAM (STR), which affords far more savings than older standby modes; this is usually controlled through your computer’s initial setup option when booting (BIOS).
* Consider using a power strip with an occupancy sensor for all your peripheral devices. The occupancy sensor detects if there is movement and will power down any connected devices if there has been no activity for a preset period. This can keep the consumption of all your additional gadgets low, such as chargers, sync cradles, and desk lamps.

Buying New Equipment

Here are some things to consider before purchasing a new computer:

* It almost goes without saying but it is still worth mentioning: don’t buy CRT monitors. Rather, opt for a much more efficient LCD instead. LCD monitors are virtually standard now, but if given the option, remember that an average CRT monitor uses over 40W more than an equivalent LCD while in operation.
* Look for the Energy Star logo! The Energy Star program was created by the EPA to reduce the negative effects that PCs have on the environment. In accordance with the voluntary guidelines, these computers, monitors, and printers can automatically power down to a sleep mode to save energy when not in use. Energy Star computers are 65% more efficient on average compared to equipment without this certification.
These added capabilities do not increase price nor decrease performance. If you cannot find a logo on your equipment, you can search equipment listings on the Energy Star Computers page. The University of Michigan is actively committed to efficient computing purchases and is a member of Climate Savers Computing. Read the U-M News Service press release.)
* If you are building your own system, look for an 80-Plus®-certified power supply. This is a certification that your computer power supply is at least 80% efficient, and is equivalent to current Energy Star guidelines with respect to your power supply.

The Paper Chase

When computers first became popular, many thought they would revolutionize the modern-day workplace and usher in the “paperless office.” In most offices, however, it would seem that this has yet to take place, and it is not yet proven that paper consumption has decreased in any appreciable amount. Billions of memos, letters, reports, rough drafts, and final documents are created every year on the PC. Printed, they use a lot of paper. In 2005, the University of Michigan recycled 3,600 tons of paper, and more than 29,000 tons since 1990. Each ton of paper requires anywhere from 12 to 24 trees to produce, depending on the type of paper. (Read more about paper production at the conservatree.org website.

What can you do to reduce paper waste? One way to save paper is to determine if you really need a hard copy of the document, or if it is something that can be passed along electronically. With Internet connectivity, much of the information that needs to be shared can be transmitted without printing it.

Another way you can save on paper is to re-use it. Paper that has been printed on has a blank side. You can use that blank side to jot notes, messages, and to make lists of things to do.
Recycle

Recycling can also help reduce the impact that computers have on energy usage. You can recycle:

1. Your old computer. Recycling or reusing electronics is an important environmental concern. Properly disposing of your computer helps prevent mercury, cadmium, lead, and hazardous chemicals from leaching into our environment. Many sources will do this for a nominal fee, or even for free. For example, both Dell and Apple will accept your old machine when you purchase a new one. Depreciated machines at the University of Michigan are wiped of all data and sent to Property Disposition to be sold as used equipment.
2. Ink and toner cartridges. Cartridges can be refilled, re-manufactured, and re-used. Many re-manufacturers will take your used cartridge, refurbish it, and refill it. Re-manufactured toner and ink cartridges are considerable less than what they would cost new.
3. Paper. Whenever possible, use post-consumer recycled-content paper. The cost and quality differences of recycled to virgin paper today is negligible. And remember to re-use blank sides of used paper for inkjet printing and scratch paper.
Laughing Laughing Laughing bounce bounce bounce bounce bounce bounce[/color]
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Jovylin O. Sandoval

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Tue Jul 14, 2009 2:32 am

What is Green Computing?

Green computing is the study and practice of using computing resources efficiently. The primary objective of such a program is to account for the triple bottom line, an expanded spectrum of values and criteria for measuring organizational (and societal) success. The goals are similar to green chemistry; reduce the use of hazardous materials, maximize energy efficiency during the product's lifetime, and promote recyclability or biodegradability of defunct products and factory waste.


The 3 URLs that talk about Green Campus Computing:


1.
Campus computing comes up green
Center works to safely dispose of e-waste


It talks about that although students enjoy the stylish new Macs and PCs in computing labs across campus, some might stop to ponder the fate of that dusty, old machine with the sticky keys they loved to hate in last year's class. The U's Green Computing Resource Center helps ensure that electronic dinosaurs, now known as e-waste, stay out of the landfill. They notes the toxicity of components in used equipment. These components include lead, mercury, hexavalent chromium and brominated flame retardants. All are hazardous and can create long-term issues if not handled properly. GRX (Guaranteed Recycling Xperts), a company that contracts with the state and local schools to process this e-waste in an environmentally responsible manner deconstructs the outdated machinery at their processing facility in Clearfield and isolates anything containing hazardous materials. Some components are re-utilized, some are recycled and some usable items are resold. Their stated goal is to return 100 percent of the material to the manufacturing process.

URL: http://www.dailyutahchronicle.com/news/campus-computing-comes-up-green-1.345643




2.
Green Computing in Sites


It talks about the Energy Efficiency Initiatives in Sites that takes its stewardship of University resources very seriously and fully supports the University's institutional commitment to green computing practices.

Some specific examples of energy efficiency initiatives already pursued by Sites include:

• Campus Computing Sites was the first large campus computing provider to purchase much more energy efficient LCD flat-panel displays. They also replaced mini-towers with "small form factor" desktop Windows machines. The switch to these physically smaller, more energy efficient machines resulted in significant energy savings for our partners and the University.
• All Sites computers purchased in the last six years have been EPA Energy Star compliant. All Sites computers purchased in the last year are compliant with the new, more restrictive Energy Star guidelines released on July 20, 2007.
• Sites computers are left on 24/7 throughout most of the year. The primary reason for this is that our Windows and Macintosh computers receive new software and security updates overnight. Sites computers switch to lower-power energy-saving modes when they are left unattended for extended periods of time. These power-saving modes can reduce power consumption by 50–95%, depending on the model.
• Sites printers make use of "deep sleep" energy-saving features that reduce energy consumption when not in use. These features appear to be well implemented and do not require additional development work on their part.

URL: http://www.itcs.umich.edu/sites/general/green.php



3.
Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money


It talks about "Greening the Internet Economy," that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The researchers have also started work on hardware to help colleges and other organizations understand how to make their servers more efficient. The device, called the GreenLight Instrument, will deploy sensors and software to measure the energy use, humidity, and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Data Center, a popular, self-contained complex of servers. The goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption, and for them to be more precisely determine how to use energy.

URL: http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm



However, here are some suggested ways on how the university can adopt the concept of Green Campus Computing:

• Turn off the monitor when it's not in use
• Use more energy efficient monitors like LCDs instead of the traditional CRT monitors
• Volunteer computing or file sharing practices
• Virtualization of servers
• Use more energy efficient and less noisy cooling systems (like using liquid cooling systems instead of the conventional heat sinks and fans)
• Temperature maintenance and regulation to reduce thermal shock wear and tear to computer parts
• Increase online security measures through the use of firewalls, anti spyware and anti virus programs to reduce the increasing amount of eWaste on the Internet and on other networks.
• Use the power management correctly, so that we can save energy costs per year.
• Do away with paper altogether because it costs a lot of money and wastes paper. Instead, use ebook reader that would be incredibly cool and which you can use for your entire life, too.
• Use DC Power instead of AC Power to save space, save energy loss inside the adaptors and saves ventilation costs.


Furthermore, the power to demand such green policies lies within us; the student, the teachers, the faculties and the school. There is no “cost vs. green” battle here. We must demand that if we want us to make us buy green products, then it had better be cheaper too! Wink

So take action, speak out by writing letters and asking questions, entrepreneur, go for seminars, bore your friends with information, build interdisciplinary dialogues etc. Together we can move towards a better world for the next generation to inherit and let us make our campus computing be “Green”. cheers cheers cheers





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kristine_delatorre

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Tue Jul 14, 2009 10:20 am

http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm

this site is an online newspaper of an news page about the Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money topic written by Josh Keller dated January 28, 2009. It talks about the conference entitled "Greening the Internet Economy" that aims to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event was held at University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.

In San Diego, California, researchers have started work on hardware to help colleges and other organizations understand how to make their servers more efficient. The device, called the GreenLight Instrument, will deploy sensors and software to measure the energy use, humidity, and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Data Center, a popular, self-contained complex of servers.

The major aim of the conference is to encourage universities and individuals with the initiative of students to "divorce ourselves from the electrical grid" this was according to Bill St. Arnaud, chief research officer at Canarie Inc., a Canadian computer-networking organization.


http://itcs-dev.www.umich.edu/sites/general/access.php

this sites, Campus Computing Sites has dedicated themselves to support the Information Technology Central Services at the University of Michigan resources in serious institutional commitment to green computing practices.

It suggested that the best energy saving practice for individual computer users is to turn their machine off if not in use for an extended period.

But the main Energy Efficiency Initiatives of this Sites are exampled below:

- Campus Computing Sites was the first large campus computing provider to purchase much more energy efficient LCD flat-panel displays. We also replaced mini-towers with "small form factor" desktop Windows machines. The switch to these physically smaller, more energy efficient machines resulted in significant energy savings for our partners and the University.

- Sites printers make use of "deep sleep" energy-saving features that reduce energy consumption when not in use. These features appear to be well implemented and do not require additional development work on our part.


http://english.moe.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=11274&ctNode=516&mp=1

this site is a new entitled "The Green Initiative of Universities - Press Conference of Talloires Declaration"

Dated June 5, 2009, Ministry of Education held the Press Conference of Talloires Declaration with the sponsorship of the Chinese Society for Environmental Education. Political Deputy Minister, Lu Mu-lin, and thirteen principals of model "green" colleges and universities were invited to the press conference to sign the declaration in order to demonstrate the determination of the Ministry of Education and the participating schools to create green and sustainable campuses with low carbon emissions.

"Recently, the Ministry of Education has been committed to promoting sustainable campuses and has seen positive results. In 2007, Ministry of Education announced the policies of conserving energy and reducing carbon emissions in colleges and universities. Ministry of Education formally initiated the "Green University" program in Taiwan in 2007, in the hope that new resources and facilities will create environment-friendly campuses with low carbon emissions." According to the said news article.

This sites mirror the project of the Government of Taiwan to pursue green computing in its different universities and colleges. Furthermore, supports Global advantage in being a role model of environmental awareness.


http://www.uoregon.edu/~recycle/GreenComputing/GreenCompGuide_text.htm

this site suggested guiding tips to conserve energy in the university facilities. Such of this tips are as follows:

1. Computers are now designed to handle 40,000 on/off cycles. This is considerably more cycles than the average user will initiate in the computer’s 5-7 year life span. Turning your computer off helps reduce heat stress and wear on the system.

2. Screen savers were originally designed to help protect the life span of monochrome monitors which are now technologically obsolete. Most screen savers do not save energy unless they actually turn off the screen or, in the case of laptops, turn off the back light.


3. Newer computers are designed to sleep on networks to prevent loss of data or connection. CPU’s with Wake on LAN (WOL) technology built-in to network cards can be left in sleep mode overnight to wake-up and receive data packets sent to the unit.



Conclusion:

How will our university USEP Adopt Green Campus Computing?

It isn't hard to stand for changes. Recycle as the main step to start the change. Do simple energy saving tips. But above all the student's awareness and sympathy to the environment is the main key in order for us to step forward for change. The earth needs protection from us and as student in universities and college, we are encourage to stand up!
The university faculties and the institution itself must address it matter with immediate actions. Impose strict compliance to the Laws or Rules in Energy conservation. Conduct recreational activities that enhances awareness to the students. Time to save Mother Earth! flower
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creza_jill_bulacito

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PostSubject: Green Campus Computing   Tue Jul 14, 2009 11:06 am



GREEN CAMPUS COMPUTING


Promoting Green Computing Helps to protect our environment specially nowadays we are living in a modern time which depends on technologie. There are a lot of ways to protect our environment like shut down your computer when not in use, conserving electrical consumption and many more.



What is Green Computing?

Green computing is the environmentally responsible use of technology.


What can I do to “green” my technology use?

• Enable power management on your computer.
• Power down the computer and monitor when not in use.
• Consider plugging your computer and peripherals into a power strip with an on/off switch and turn the entire power strip off when not in use.
• Think before you print. Do you really need a paper copy?
• Use recycled paper if possible
• Use Print Preview to review your job before printing it
• Print in black and white whenever possible.
• Print two-sided whenever possible.
• Reuse unnecessary print jobs as scratch paper.
• Advertise events, parties, etc. electronically or with chalk instead of print-outs.
• Recycle!
o Use the recycling bins around campus to recycle paper, glass, aluminum, and plastic
o Toner on campus can be brought to ISR for recycling
o Beloit College computers and laptop batteries can be brought to ISR for recycling
o Recycle used alkaline batteries in Pearsons by the mail center or in the Library
• Use email instead of faxes
• If you are in the market for a new computer at home, consider buying an Energy Star compliant computer
• If it’s possible, download software from the web instead of purchasing a physical installation disc

What is Power management and how does it help?
Every day energy is wasted by computers and monitors that are left on when not in use. By simply putting the hard drive and monitor to sleep after a short period of inactivity, huge energy savings can be realized. The computer should wake up with a quick click of the mouse or by pressing a key on the keyboard. In some cases, you will need to press the power button briefly to wake the computer up. Also, be sure to shut down your computer before leaving for the day and over weekends. Use this handy calculator to get an idea of how much energy and money can be saved.

Some Myths and Facts about Power Management*
Myth: Computers have a shorter life when you turn them on and off frequently.
Fact: Hard disks in PCs older than 10 years did not automatically park their heads when shut off, leading to disk damage from frequent on/off power cycling. Newer PCs are designed to handle over 40,000 on/off cycles.
Myth: Turning your computer off uses more energy than leaving it on.
Fact: The surge of power when a computer is turned off lasts a few seconds and is insignificant compared to the sustained energy used in keeping it on during periods of inactivity.
Myth: As long as the computer is off, it’s not using any power.
Fact: As long as they are plugged in, your computer and other electronic devices continue to use electricity – even when they are turned off or in standby mode. A computer uses up to 10 watts when it is turned off but still plugged in.

http://www.beloit.edu/isr/greencomputing.php

Overview of Procedure

The increase in U-M consumption of electricity and paper causes an increase in air pollution, solid waste, and the burning of fossil fuels. Much of the paper used by PCs is wasted. National estimates indicate that most PCs are not being used most of the time they are on. In addition, 30 - 40 percent of all PCs are left on overnight and on weekends.
On the U-M Ann Arbor campus, PC operation alone may account for at least $1.8 million in energy costs each year. This represents approximately 11 percent of the total amount spent by the U-M on electricity. It is estimated that a PC system can easily consume 300 watts of electricity per hour ‚ the same amount of energy needed to operate three 100 watt light bulbs.
The following "green computing" habits can significantly reduce the amount of electricity and environmental waste for which PCs are responsible.

Waste Minimization Procedure
Electrical Conservation Tips:
• Turn the computer off overnight and on weekends;
• Wait until ready to use the PC before turning it on;
• If the computer is going to be inactive for more than 16 minutes, consider turning it off. After this time, the energy needed to run the computer outweighs the start-up energy;
• Do not turn on the printer until ready to print, even an idle printer consumes energy;
• Try to schedule computer-related activities to do them all at once, keeping the computer off at other times;
• If spending a large amount of time at the computer, consider reducing the light level in your office. This may improve cathode ray tube screen visibility as well as save energy.


http://www.p2000.umich.edu/energy_conservation/ec7.htm


Universities Take Climate Savers Computing Pledge to Save Energy, Emissions

PORTLAND, Ore. -- With nearly 25 percent of its campus community pledging to do more to manage the energy used by their computers, the University of Maine at Farmington won the first-ever pledge drive to bring campuses on board with green IT practices.

The contest was part of the Climate Savers Computing Initiative's "Power Down for the Planet Pledge," which brought 19 colleges on board with CSCI's mission to practice smart computing. Together, the group estimates that the 17,000 total pledges will save around 4.2 million kilowatt-hours of electricity in a year, saving $450,000 or more in costs and offsetting over 3,000 tons of CO2 emissions.

"The University of Maine at Farmington won by getting the highest percentage of their campus to pledge," said Pat Tiernan, executive director of Climate Savers Computing Initiative. "Their commitment means they'll offset 125 tons of carbon per year, save 164,000 kilowatt-hours of energy and more than $17,000 in energy costs."

Rounding out the top five universities were Mississippi's Jackson State University, the University of Iowa, Furman University in South Carolina, and the University of Michigan.

By participating in the pledge drive, each of the schools is now a member of the Climate Savers Computing Initiative, a non-profit group launched in 2007 to promote energy-efficient and environmentally friendly IT practices. The universities have agreed to adopt power management strategies for their campus computer fleets, and take energy-use criteria into account in future PC and server purchases.

Last month, the Climate Savers teamed up with the U.S. EPA to present a Power Management Summit aimed at exploring and explaining the benefits of power management for companies of all sizes.



http://www.greenercomputing.com/news/2009/04/22/universities-computing-save-energy[/url]


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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Tue Jul 14, 2009 11:28 am

The Green Campus Computing

"Center works to safely dispose of e-waste"


"The U's Green Computing Resource Center helps ensure that electronic dinosaurs, now known as e-waste, stay out of the landfill, and is addressing a host of other environmental issues created by the vast array of technological hardware and processes at the U.

Using a thumb-drive in place of burning a CD, utilizing network connections for data transfer instead of other media and simply turning off a machine or monitor when you're done with it are all steps that save energy and resources.


In the bigger view, Reich and others involved with the group are looking at where equipment comes from. A new way of evaluating sustainability in products is the so-called "cradle-to-cradle" design
scheme, which determines how easily and efficiently a product can be re-utilized and/or recycled before it's made. These design considerations optimize the ability to deal with the product
responsibly when its "useful" life is over.

Currently, e-waste generated at the U is processed via the university surplus and salvage department. This department separates anything that still has "utility" from true waste. Usable items are resold, while waste is handled by Guaranteed Recycling Xperts, a company that contracts with the state and local schools to process this e-waste in an environmentally responsible manner."



http://www.dailyutahchronicle.com/news/campus-computing-comes-up-green-1.345643
by: Arthur Raymond

"UC San Diego Campus Computing Goes Green"




"Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.

The goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption, said Thomas A. DeFanti, principal investigator on the project and a senior research strategist at the university's California Institute for Telecommunications and
Information Technology."


http://esi.ucsd.edu/esiportal/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=228&Itemid=101
by: Josh Keller



"Campus Computing and the Environment"



"In response to the release of the study Environmental Impact of Computer Information Technology in an Institutional Setting: A Case Study at the University of Guelph the ISC struck a Green Computing Task Group to review policies, guidelines and practices at the University of Guelph with respect to the purchase, use and disposal of computers 1 , in order to make recommendations that would mitigate the environmental impacts of computing on campus."


http://www.isc.uoguelph.ca/documents/061211GreenComputingFinalReport2006_000.pdf
Report of the Green Computing Task Group to ISC



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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Tue Jul 14, 2009 12:08 pm


What is green computing?

According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_computing Green computing is the study and practice of using computing resources efficiently. The primary objective of such a program is to account for the triple bottom line, an expanded spectrum of values and criteria for measuring organizational (and societal) success. The goals are similar to green chemistry; reduce the use of hazardous materials, maximize energy efficiency during the product's lifetime, and promote recyclables or biodegradability of defunct products and factory waste.

Modern IT systems rely upon a complicated mix of people, networks and hardware; as such, a green computing initiative must be systemic in nature, and address increasingly sophisticated problems. Elements of such a solution may comprise items such as end user satisfaction, management restructuring, regulatory compliance, disposal of electronic waste, telecommuting, virtualization of server resources, energy use, thin client solutions, and return on investment (ROI).

The imperative for companies to take control of their power consumption, for technology and more generally, therefore remains acute. One of the most effective power management tools available in 2009 may still be simple, plain, common sense.[1]


Green Campus




Our nation’s institutions of higher education spend a significant portion of their annual operating budgets on utility services, diverting funds from valuable programmatic and community-building activities. The Alliance to Save Energy’s Green Campus Program is leading the way towards campus sustainability by bridging the divide between students and institutional energy costs. Through Green Campus, students are working to save energy on campuses by building general campus awareness, incorporating energy conservation and efficiency into course curricula, and implementing projects targeting energy use, student purchasing decisions, and operational changes.

Like a Star @ heaven http://ase.org/content/article/detail/3037



San Diego State Green Campus
by SDSU Greencampus


We are all about advocating energy efficiency and sustainability on campus. We believe in the back to basics approach: Organic living, thinking simple and exploring the rich relationship between people and the community.
Our Purpose
We aim to conserve energy usage and promote sustainability by advocating to students and community about the simple things they can do for the environment.

Like a Star @ heaven http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=23&Itemid=40


Green IT and Green Computing Technology



( Green Technology )


Green IT, also known as Green Computing, is the movement towards a more environmentally friendly and cost-effective use of power and production in technology. The crux of Green IT is to double or triple the bottom line investment costs by converting existing structures and systems to this more conservative mode of operation in green computing. Some common Green computing concepts are Virtualization, Recycling, Telecommuting and Power Management through the use of efficient devices. So help save the environment, save yourself some money and "go green" with green IT computing.

Like a Star @ heaven http://www.eweek.com/c/s/Green-IT/


My Opinion...

The university played a big role to push a campaigned for this “green campus computing” program. Many campuses had already imposed and cooperate to establish an eco-friendly environment through saving energy from using computers. My suggestions on how will the university can adopt this concepts are according to what I have read from the many articles and URL’s that promote green computing. First, today would not be too late to participate in this kind of program. The university directors, faculty members, instructors and students must have to cooperate to make this program possible. Those who are in position must imposed green computing in this university down to every colleges and departments. Campaigns should be done and proper notifications should be handled in order to promote the program to the students. Though this would not be achieve in a blink of an eye, at least, constant reminders specially to students who were the constant users must helped to take this practice as a daily routine and as is like breathing. As an IT student, we should be aware of every possible effect that would take place especially that we more knew how advanced technology gave benefits as well as disadvantage to the environment.


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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Tue Jul 14, 2009 1:34 pm

Green computing techniques are easy to incorporate. And it will result in: a reduction in overall operating costs by reducing power use, using shared hardware resources, reusing similar systems, and reducing supplies such as toner, ink and paper, enhanced work environments such as campus computer lab space and office work space with reduced noise pollution and eye strain from traditional CRTs, corporate and social responsibility through a focus on the Triple Bottom Line, an expanded set of success values focusing on people, planet and profit, an enhanced University Image: green computing solutions on the U campus can be used as marketing tools for potential students and researchers.

Putting The University Laboratory’s Computers To Sleep

When you're not using your computer, you can save energy by putting it to "sleep." When your computer is in sleep, it's turned on but in a low power mode. It takes less time for a computer to wake up from sleep than it does for the computer to start up after being turned off.

You can put your computer to sleep right away by choosing Apple menu > Sleep. You can also choose to put the computer to sleep automatically when your computer has been inactive for a specified amount of time. You can also set only the display to sleep. If your computer is in the middle of a task that you want to let finish while you are away (for example, burning a DVD), you should set only the display to sleep.

Open Power Options in Control Panel. In Power Schemes, click the down arrow, and then select a power scheme. The time settings for the power scheme are displayed in System standby, Turn off monitor, and Turn off hard disks. To turn off your monitor before your computer goes on standby, select a time in Turn off monitor. To turn off your hard disk before your computer goes on standby, select a time in Turn off hard disks.

The University Should Go Green to Save Money

Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves. To supply computers directly with local DC power. Computers generally use direct current, but the public electricity grid typically supplies alternating current, and 30 percent of the electricity can be lost in the conversion of one form to the other. Intelligent measuring systems like Greenlight should be extended to allow engineers to more precisely determine how to use energy.

The University Offices Computer-Generated Waste Should Properly Disposed

Important steps toward green computing include modifying paper and toner use, disposal of old computer equipment and purchasing decisions when considering new computer equipment.

Paper Waste
• Print as little as possible. Review and modify documents on the screen and use print preview. Minimize the number of hard copies and paper drafts you make. Instead of printing, save information to disks, or USB memory sticks.
• Recycle waste paper, have a recycle bin at each community printer and copier location.
• Buy and use recycled paper in your printers and copiers. From an environmental point of view, the best recycled paper is 100 percent post-consumer recycled content.
• Save e-mail whenever possible and avoid needless printing of e-mail messages.
• Use e-mail instead of faxes or send faxes directly from your computer to eliminate the need for a hard copy. When you must fax using hard copies, save paper using a "sticky" fax address note and not a cover sheet.
• On larger documents, use smaller font sizes (consistent with readability) to save paper.
• If your printer prints a test page whenever it is turned on, disable this unnecessary feature.
• Before recycling paper, which has print on only one side, set it aside for use as scrap paper or for printing drafts.
• When documents are printed or copied, use double-sided printing and copying. If possible, use the multiple pages per sheet option on printer properties.
• When general information-type documents must be shared within an office, try circulating them instead of making an individual copy for each person. Even better, make the document electronically available to the audience and display it on a projector.

Electronic Waste
• Use the campus network where possible to transfer files. This avoids the need to write CDs or DVDs or use floppy diskettes.
• Use USB memory sticks instead of CDs, DVDs, or floppies.
• Use re-writable CDs and DVDs.
• There are hopes of the University Recycling program addressing e-waste in the near future.

Reference:
www.utah.edu
http://greencampus.winserve.org
www.dailyutahchronicle.com
My Blog: jhunix1@blogspot


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PostSubject: Assignment 4   Tue Jul 14, 2009 2:17 pm


URLS:



Green Computing


http://www.uoregon.edu/~recycle/GreenComputing/GreenCompGuide_text.htm
http://green.wikia.com/wiki/Green_Computing
http://www.foursquareinnovations.co.uk/software_development_and_ebusiness_articles/green_computing_tips.html
http://www.uoregon.edu/~recycle/GreenComputing/GreenCompGuide_text.htm
http://www.foursquareinnovations.co.uk/software_development_and_ebusiness_articles/green_computing_tips.html


Common Computer Myths:
Below are the misconception about using computers:

Myth: It is bad to turn off the computer.
Truth: Computers are now designed to handle 40,000 on/off cycles. This is considerably more cycles than the average user will initiate in the computer’s 5-7 year life span. Turning your computer off helps reduce heat stress and wear on the system.

Myth: Turning your computer off uses more energy than leaving it on.
Truth: The surge of power used by a CPU to boot up is far less than the energy used by the unit when left on for over 3 minutes.

Myth: Screen savers save energy.
Truth: Screen savers were originally designed to help protect the life span of monochrome monitors which are now technologically obsolete. Most screen savers do not save energy unless they actually turn off the screen or, in the case of laptops, turn off the back light.

Myth: Network connections are lost when a PC goes into low-power/sleep mode.
Truth: Newer computers are designed to sleep on networks to prevent loss of data or connection. CPU’s with Wake on LAN (WOL) technology built-in to network cards can be left in sleep mode overnight to wake-up and receive data packets sent to the unit.



Green Computing

~the study and practice of efficient and eco-friendly computing resources.
“Think Green”
Change your computer habits to use less energy and save money.


The growing use of computers has caused a dramatic increase in energy consumption especially in our school. Here in our University every office, colleges, library and laboratory have computers and printers. Each year more and more computers are purchased and put to use, but it’s not just the number of computers that is driving energy consumption upward. The way that we use computers also adds to the increasing energy burden.
As you observe here in our school, computers are continuously running even if it isn’t in use. In our computer laboratory, not all the time all computer units are used but you can see it is on even no one uses it.
Every time we leave computers or lights on we waste electricity. Burning fossil fuels generates most of our electricity and it also emits pollutants, sulfur, and carbon dioxide into the air. These emissions can cause respiratory disease, smog, acid rain and global climate change.



Tips and Tricks to Green Computing

• Power off your monitor when not in use instead of using screensavers
• Enable the standby/sleep mode and power management settings
• Power computers down on weekends and evenings
• Turn off all devices until you are ready to use them (scanners, speakers, printers)
• Don’t power your computer on until you are ready to use it
• Select dark backgrounds for your screen display. Do not use bright displays, which consume more power
• Review documents and emails onscreen instead of printing them out
• Use double sided printing functions

Create a “Green” Machine:

Enable Power Management Features:

Windows 98/ME/2000/XP
• Select Start> Settings> Control Panel> and Display.
• Select the Screen Saver tab. Choose a predominantly black screen saver and set it to wait for 5 minutes
• Click on Settings or Power to reach the power management settings
• Click the Shut Off Monitor box and set for 10 minutes
• Click Ok or Apply.
• Set Turn off hard disks for 15 minutes (or less)
• Set System standby for 30 minutes (or less)
• Click Ok or Apply.

The computers we all use day in and day out are huge energy wasters, unless we know how to manage them responsibly. It is simple way that we can help and suggest to apply to our University is by using sleep mode, avoiding screensavers, and remembering to always shut down your computer when you aren’t using it for an extended period of time, are all small actions that have big benefits.
Our school computer users should activate sleep mode on a regular basis. Sleep mode does no damage to the computer; it simply turns off your monitor after a period of inactivity. Pressing a key or clicking the mouse reactivates the monitor. Additionally, screensavers do not save energy, contrary to popular myth. In fact, screensavers can actually use twice as much energy as the computer would use without a screensaver. These screen saver programs also involve system interaction with your CPU that results in additional energy consumption. A blank screen saver is slightly better but even that only reduces monitor energy consumption by a few percent, but still it benefits us. And don’t forget to turn your computer off when you aren’t returning to it soon!
We have common misconception that a computer’s life is shortened by turning it on and off has led some to leave computers on all the time. Others are hesitant to switch their computers on and off a couple times during their workday despite only using this equipment or unit.

Computers generate heat and require additional cooling which adds to energy costs, that’s why most of our computer laboratory has air-condition which contribute for energy consumption. I encourage all computer users to enable their Power Management Features. And lets thanks to the U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA), personal computer systems purchased today can be easy on energy. These “Energy Star” computers and monitors can be programmed to automatically “power-down” to a low power state when they are not being used. These efficiency gains can be achieved without any sacrifice in computing performance.
The EPA has estimated that providing computers with “sleep mode” reduces their energy use by 60 to 70 percent – and ultimately could save enough electricity each year to power Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine, cut electric bills by $2 billion, and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by the equivalent of 5 million cars.

How Much Energy Does Your Computer System Use?

A typical desktop PC system is comprised of the computer itself (the CPU or the “box”), a monitor, and printer. Your CPU may require approximately 100 watts of electrical power. Add 50-150 watts for a 15-17 inch monitor, proportionately more for larger monitors. The power requirements of conventional laser printers can be as much as 100 watts or more when printing though much less if idling in a “sleep mode.” Ink jet printers use as little as 12 watts while printing and 5 watts while idling.

We also suggest to do some Campus E-Waste Recycling in our school, in which the University of Oregon done to their campus.

Campus E-Waste Recycling:
Do you have old and unused electronics stored away? Our University should now recycles:
• CPUs, Monitors, and Printers
• Floppy Disks and Compact Discs
• Toner Cartridges and Ink Jets
• Cell Phones, Palm Pilots (PDA’s)
• 2-Way Radios/Beepers/Pagers
• Audio and Video Tapes

Think about this:

A desktop computer left on for a full year would release 1500 pounds of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. It would take up to 500 trees to offset that amount of carbon. Just by changing your computing habits, you can save significantly on pollution and energy costs. (According to the Harvard Green Campus Initiative)
A computer left continuously running will emit 2161 pounds of CO2 in a year and cost $45 a year to power at $0.0372 per kWh. A major cause of global warming.
Turning a computer off at night so it runs only 8 hours a day computes to a reduction of 810 kWh per year, or a 67% yearly savings.

Some specific suggestions that we can implement to our school:
• Unless you require immediate access to e-mail or other Internet services, break the habit of turning on all your computer equipment as soon as you enter the office each day.
• If practical, informally group your computer activities and try to do then during one or two parts of the day, leaving the computer off at other times.
• Avoid using the switch on a power strip to turn on all your equipment.
• If you use a laser printer, don’t turn your printer on until you are ready to print.
• Turn off your entire computer system (CPU, monitor and printer) or at least your monitor and printer when you go to lunch or will be out of office for a meeting or an errand.
• For “computer servers” which must be on to serve network functions, explore ways to turn servers off at night.
• If monitors are not needed for “servers” to operate, keep server monitors off. If server monitor is needed during the day, at least turn it off at night and weekends.


The energy saving suggestions listed above are appropriate for many campus PC users, some of the suggestions may be inappropriate for certain computer applications or work situations. To come up with the good planning to Green Computing to our University, staffs and all computer users should discuss possible energy conservation measures to determine which steps can be taken without harming productivity.
Our energy conservation program will not work without everybody’s help. Let’s all be an energy educator and gently remind our classmates and instructors to save energy by changing their computer habits.



Other Green Computing Practices that can be adopted to our School

You can take a giant step toward environmentally responsible or “green” computing by conserving energy with your computer. But green computing involves other important steps as well. These pertain to paper use, toner cartridges, disposal of old computer equipment and purchasing decisions when considering new computer equipment.
Reducing Paper Waste
Rather than creating a paperless office, computer use has vastly increased paper consumption and paper waste. Here are some suggestions for reducing waste:
• Print as little as possible.
Review and modify documents on the screen and use print preview. Minimize the number of hard copies and paper drafts you make. Instead of printing, save information to disks.
• Recycle waste paper.
You may use the back page of the paper as a draft.
• Buy and use recycled paper in your printers and copiers.
From an environmental point of view, the best recycled paper is 100 percent post consumer recycled content.
• Save e-mail whenever possible and avoid needless printing of e-mail messages.
• Use e-mail instead of faxes or send faxes directly from your computer to eliminate the need for a hard copy.
When you must fax using hard copies, save paper using a “sticky” fax address note and not a cover sheet.
• On larger documents, use smaller font sizes (consistent with readability) to save paper.
• If your printer prints a test page whenever it is turned on, disable this unnecessary feature.
• Before recycling paper, which has print on only one side, set it aside for use as scrap paper or in printing drafts.
• When documents are printed or copied, use double-sided printing and copying. If possible, use the multiple pages per sheet option on printer properties.
• When general information-type documents must be shared within an office, try circulating them instead of making an individual copy for each person. This can also be done easily by e-mail.

Above this tips and practices can be adopt to in our school. We are not focus on how we save energy but also in paper waste. All colleges use printers for printing purposes. And we all know some of the staffs irresponsibly use paper when doing printing which causes in paper wastages. I think we should implement this, it really benefits us.
We as a student, with this information stated above and our own little way to save the environment is in our hands. Lets work together to save mother earth!


Last edited by Ma.AnnKristineTomada on Thu Jul 16, 2009 12:15 am; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : additional info and answer to my assignment.)
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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Tue Jul 14, 2009 3:28 pm

Green Campus Computing



Green Campus Program

The Green Campus Program (GCP) empowers students to lead energy efficiency and conservation campaigns at their universities. Green Campus interns design and implement energy efficiency projects. These projects result in measurable energy savings and reduced carbon emissions for the campus. Green Campus interns are also dedicated to educating the campus community on the relationship between energy use and the environment.


http://www.humboldt.edu/~greenhsu/cms/



Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money

By JOSH KELLER
Relocate a college\'s server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.
Those were a few of the ideas discussed last week at a conference, \"Greening the Internet Economy,\" that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event, held by the University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.
Many of the participants emphasized the importance of systems that could more intelligently measure energy use on the campus. In recent years, colleges have been hurt by the rising costs of powering and cooling their data centers, in part because those costs are difficult to measure and poorly understood.
Aiming for Precision
Intelligent measuring systems like Greenlight should be extended to allow engineers to more precisely determine how to use energy, said Gary L. Baldwin, director of special projects at the University of California\'s Citris program. For example, he said, operators at a data center could direct cool air only where the facility is generating the most heat.
Another idea that shows promise, participants said, is to supply computers directly with local DC power. Computers generally use direct current, but the public electricity grid typically supplies alternating current, and 30 percent of the electricity can be lost in the conversion of one form to the other.
Some colleges have started projects to power their computers directly from solar cells or other sources of DC power on the campus, avoiding the energy loss altogether. At San Diego, administrators hope to build a \"power ring\" that will supply computers across the campus with DC power, said Mr. DeFanti.
The rethinking of how to supply campus power is part of a broader effort to \"divorce ourselves from the electrical grid,\" said Bill St. Arnaud, chief research officer at Canarie Inc., a Canadian computer-networking organization. Power-transmission lines lose a significant amount of energy over long distances, he said, which means that supplying a campus with energy from faraway power plant can be inefficient.
A better strategy, Mr. St. Arnaud said, is to build campus data centers next to a renewable source of power, like a solar plant. High-speed optical transmission lines, he said, would ensure that the computers would seem \"as close as next door.\"


http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm



PUTTING YOUR COMPUTER TO

SLEEP
When you\'re not using your computer, you can save energy by putting it to \"sleep.\" When your computer is in sleep, it\'s turned on but in a low power mode. It takes less time for a computer to wake up from sleep than it does for the computer to start up after being turned off.
You can put your computer to sleep right away by choosing Apple menu > Sleep. You can also choose to put the computer to sleep automatically when your computer has been inactive for a specified amount of time. You can also set only the display to sleep. If your computer is in the middle of a task that you want to let finish while you are away (for example, burning a DVD), you should set only the display to sleep.


http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/



About Green Campus

Program Goals
The Alliance to Save Energy’s Green Campus Program is a student-led initiative that educates the campus community on energy efficiency; achieves energy savings; and encourages the next generation of energy efficiency professionals by:
• Realizing measurable energy savings through research, educational campaigns, technology projects, and facilitation of retrofits;
• Supporting green workforce development through training, mentoring, and integrated academic curricula, internships, and project-based learning;
• Fostering ongoing awareness about the relationship between energy and the environment;
• Developing and implementing campus energy efficiency policy and action;
• Creating effective and lasting partnerships among students, faculty, administrators, and staff within and across campuses.
Program Structure and Resources
• Green Campus interns work closely with administrators, faculty, and staff to create a strategic plan that addresses each of the program’s goals and is uniquely tailored to the needs, challenges, and strengths of their school.
• Green Campus is a student-driven program; each Green Campus school has funding for forty hours of intern time per week.
• The Alliance to Save Energy recruits, selects, and oversees between two and four interns per campus; with supervision from Alliance staff, and input from campus staff, these interns are primarily responsible for the day-to-day implementation of Green Campus at their school.
• The Alliance supports Green Campus interns through continuous remote consultation, regular on-campus visits, and bi- annual program-wide convergences.
• Interns at Green Campus schools have an operating budget that they use to secure space for events, incentivize student conservation, and purchase new metering equipment.
Program Rationale
• Educational campaigns can result in significant energy savings by changing behaviors and purchasing decisions.
• Students are effective advocates on college campus, able to reach their peers and high-level decision makers.
• Students can offer valuable assistance in greening campus operating procedures; student research can defer information gathering costs inherent in switching from conventional to more sustainable practices.
• Green Campus enriches students\' educational experience while allowing them to take more responsibility for campus operations.


http://ase.org/content/article/detail/3037


my blog Arrow http://fujiwarayumi.blogspot.com/


Last edited by Jezreel Jyl P. Hilado on Tue Jul 14, 2009 3:50 pm; edited 2 times in total
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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   

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