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 Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)

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eyesee

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PostSubject: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Wed Jul 01, 2009 4:46 pm

Find three(3) URL's that talk's about "green campus computing" and suggest ways how the university can adopt this concept.
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jerald jean pullos

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PostSubject: green campus computing   Sun Jul 05, 2009 5:01 am


1.
http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm

Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money
By JOSH KELLER


The goal of this site is to encourage people specifically the engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption,
According to Mr. St. Arnaud.
"A better strategy is to build campus data centers next to a renewable source of power, like a solar plant. High-speed optical transmission lines, he said, would ensure that the computers would seem "as close as next door.""

2.
http://www.isc.uoguelph.ca/documents/061211GreenComputingFinalReport2006_000.pdf

Campus Computing and
the Environment
Report of the Green Computing Task Group to ISC

this site the task force ISC conducted a case study in which they present first they their objectives and goals concerned with the environment.



3.
http://charmj.blogspot.com/2008/09/green-campus-computing.html

in this site a student give her concern to the environment by giving her thoughts about green campus computing.

THE GREEN CAMPUS COMPUTING WAS DEFINED AS THE:
positive (or least negative)
relationship between the physical computer and its impact to the environments in which it
moves through during its journey from cradle to grave. In this context the computer’s impact
to the various environments may be measured using any number of the following criteria;
From cradle: Materials from which components are manufactured (recycled or virgin
materials, materials which can be recycled, leasttoxic
materials); effluents/by products
produced in the manufacturing process (impact of effluents/by products on the
environment); assembly methods (ease the disassembly at end of life); packaging
materials used for components to facilitate storage and shipping (recycled or virgin
materials, materials which can be recycled).
Operational use: Power consumption of each component; interface with user; life cycle
(months/years before replacement is required); other consumables required to maintain.
End of use: Ability to reallocate if no longer required; supplier willing to take computer
components back under recycling program.
To grave: Effective recycling (ease of dis assembly, recycle ability
of materials); CO2
travel points (number of miles traveled and fuel consumed to get all components to their
final destination); and responsible and safe disposal of toxic components


ways to adopt the concept was:
Arrow to turn off computers when it is not in use.
* Do not turn on the printer until ready to print, even an idle printer consumes energy;
* Try to schedule computer-related activities to do them all at once, keeping the computer off at other times;
* If spending a large amount of time at the computer, consider reducing the light level in your office.

Arrow proper waste management.
* disposed the garbage to proper place.

Arrow lessen paper works to lessen cutting trees

Arrow use flat screen to lessen the production of carbin dioxide.


Last edited by jerald jean pullos on Mon Jul 27, 2009 5:24 pm; edited 7 times in total
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Marren Pequiro

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Sun Jul 05, 2009 11:59 am

Act Green! Think Green!

Green Computing used is the positive (or least negative) relationship between the physical computer and its impact to the environments in which it moves through during its journey from cradle to grave. I've heard about it last year when the third year students introduced it during our Acquaintance Party. The advocacy is just easy. There are steps that we could tag along in order to be a real advocate. However, if these steps are not used on the right track, it's still useless. So, I have three Sites down here that I believe a Green Campus Computing advocate also.


Arrow University of Colorado, Environmental Center
http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html

In this site they have introduced a book for more Green Computing Guide. As we all know, technology have arises to its higher level at this moment. So, computers have been present for so many years to campuses and Universities in order to do a more efficient and accurate job. But, have we think of the disadvantage brought by these technology? In this site they have showed us the Computer Operating Costs, Energy Efficient Computing, and other Green Computing Practices. They have shared many concepts, but let me just quote the things from their site that I think could help us to have a more greener environment.


bounce
Screen savers save no energy
If screen saver images appear on your monitor for more than 5 minutes, you are wasting energy! Screen saver programs may save the phosphors in your monitor screen, but this is not really a concern with newer monitors, especially LCD screens. And they do not save any energy. A screen saver that displays moving images causes your monitor to consume as much as electricity as it does when in active use. These screen saver programs also involve system interaction with your CPU that results in additional energy consumption. A blank screen saver is slightly better but even that only reduces monitor energy consumption by a few percent.


So if we could adopt this on our University, especially on our Computer Laboratories, we could definitely save more energy and electricity which I believe, a great problem that our University is facing right now. With this simple move, we could greatly contribute to a low power consumption campaign.

bounce When not in use, turn off the juice
This is the most basic energy conservation strategy for any type of equipment. Consider the following:

* Turn off your computer and/or peripherals when they are not in use. Turning on and off will not harm the equipment.
* Don’t run computers continuously unless they are in use continuously.
* Turn off at night and on weekends
* Look for ways to reduce the amount of time your computer is on without adversely affecting your productivity.

A very basic thing that we should always remember. Obviously, we the user of these devices have the sole responsibility to turn it off especially when not in use. Not just computers, also the lights and other appliances in the University, should not be forgotten to be switch off when they are not in use in order to conserve more energy. The employees or even the students should turn off the entire computer system (CPU, monitor and printer) or at least the monitor and printer when going out for lunch or will be out of office for a meeting or an errand. If we would just follow it, little by little, the University would learned from these and we're hoping that this could be implemented wisely.

bounce Reducing Paper Waste
Rather than creating a paperless office, computer use has vastly increased paper consumption and paper waste. Here are some suggestions for reducing waste:

* Print as little as possible. Review and modify documents on the screen and use print preview. Minimize the number of hard copies and paper drafts you make. Instead of printing, save information to disks.
* Recycle waste paper.
* Buy and use recycled paper in your printers and copiers. From an environmental point of view, the best recycled paper is 100 percent post consumer recycled content.


Paper usage is really a great part of our University. Especially, during enrollment and even in the day to day basis, paper is very important. But why not recycle and reused paper? It could minimize waste and decrease paper consumption throughout the University.



Arrow CAMPUS TECHNOLOGY
http://campustechnology.com/articles/2006/08/where-green-and-it-meet.aspx

One of the article on this site entitled Where Green and IT Meet By Linda L. Briggs, caught my attention. She featured some interesting facts about U.S. colleges and Universities. On how much they spend each year on energy and estimates the average PC wastes up to 400 kilowatt-hours of electricity per year. With this, they have discovered that IT people is not that particular when it comes to energy preservation. Although the cost of energy is soaring and computers are voracious energy consumers on campus, many in IT know very little about what their school is doing to save energy. That’s partly because most energy dollars don’t come out of the typical IT budget. The energy it takes to run PCs and servers across campus generally belongs to the facilities side, and is regarded as a set cost of doing business.

Computers are playing a growing role in energy management, as schools rely on sophisticated computerized energy management systems that rival the complexity of mission-critical systems on campus. Adopting a strategic approach to energy management, especially as new buildings are planned or retrofitted, can lower a university’s energy bills by 30 percent or more, according to figures from the government’s Energy Star Web site. Computerized energy management systems, also called building automation systems or direct digital control systems, offer software and hardware specifically for measuring and controlling energy consumption.


This strategy could be apply to our University if and only if many staff, especially the IT personalities would initiate. Though, it would cost that much, but still we will not regret it. As far as I know, Energy management systems are typically connected with different systems across the campus to collect data on everything from room temperatures, CO2 levels, and occupancy rates, to the energy used by soda machines and exit signs. The IT people could be a great help for they have the role for helping to select, install, and manage these complex systems. If this be pursue, hopefully in the near future, a lot of savings on the University overall budget can be acquired. Which we can never denied that it could ultimately benefits everyone.



Arrow http://www.edtechmag.com/higher/september-october-2007/seeing-green.html

On this site, I've found another article which promotes a greener environment. "Seeing Green" Adelphi University finds seven ways to save power by Nancy A. Feldman.

The following are the things that we should do so we can profit along the way.


bounce Spend Now, Save Later

You spend roughly 50 cents on energy for every dollar of computer hardware, according to analyst firm IDC. And this figure is expected to increase to 71 cents over the next four years. So if you have the budget for new equipment, these tips can save you money in the long run — and reduce your carbon footprint to boot.

* Power down all electronic equipment when not in use.
* Don’t use screen savers — they consume 28 percent more energy than sleep mode.
* Run updates during the day to avoid leaving PCs on overnight.
* Set printers to sleep mode. They return to active status quickly when new print jobs are submitted.
* Buy Energy Star-compliant products. Americans saved $12 billion last year through the Energy Star program.
* Consider notebooks over desktops wherever feasible. They use up to 90 percent less energy.
* Replace CRTs with LCDs; they use one-half to two-thirds of the energy.
* Consider an all-in-one rather than separate fax, printer and copier. All-in-ones save on electricity and space, and reduce equipment heat emissions.
* Enhance the energy efficiency of your storage infrastructure by using consolidation, storage tie ring, single-instance archiving, snapshot and cloning technology.

Sources: HP, EMC and IDC

As we can see, those listed above are the fundamental ways that we could perform in order for our University to save more, in electricity, space and even reduce equipment heat emissions. Though they are basic, if neither of us will initiate in doing these things, still we can never progress. Let's start on switching off all the electronic equipments especially when not in use. You can take a giant step toward environmentally responsible or “green” computing by conserving energy with your computer. But green computing involves other important steps as well. Again, if we would just support it all the way no more doubts that our University would be one of the prime advocate of Green Campus Computing.

It is up to us to keep our campus, our workplace, our home and Earth green. We are all accountable for our one and only planet Earth.


References:

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2006/08/where-green-and-it-meet.aspx
http://www.edtechmag.com/higher/september-october-2007/seeing-green.html
http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html
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Russel John Serrano

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PostSubject: Assignement 4 :: MIS1   Sun Jul 05, 2009 12:56 pm

Find three(3) URL's that talk's about "green campus computing" and suggest ways how the university can adopt this concept.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

GREEN CAMPUS COMPUTING...... ways! afro

1. Arrow Putting Your Computer To Sleep...


http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=23&Itemid=40

When you're not using your computer, you can save energy by putting it to "sleep." When your computer is in sleep, it's turned on but in a low power mode. It takes less time for a computer to wake up from sleep than it does for the computer to start up after being turned off.

You can put your computer to sleep right away by choosing Apple menu > Sleep. You can also choose to put the computer to sleep automatically when your computer has been inactive for a specified amount of time. You can also set only the display to sleep. If your computer is in the middle of a task that you want to let finish while you are away (for example, burning a DVD), you should set only the display to sleep.

PC
To automatically put your computer on standby
Open Power Options in Control Panel.
In Power Schemes, click the down arrow, and then select a power scheme. The time settings for the power scheme are displayed in System standby, Turn off monitor, and Turn off hard disks.
To turn off your monitor before your computer goes on standby, select a time in Turn off monitor.
To turn off your hard disk before your computer goes on standby, select a time in Turn off hard disks.


MAC
To set the timing for your computer to sleep:
Choose Apple menu > System Preferences, and then click Energy Saver.
Click Sleep. Click Show Details, if necessary, to see the sleep settings.
Drag the top slider to set how long the computer should be idle before going to sleep.
If you want to put the display to sleep before the whole computer, select the checkbox labeled "Put the display to sleep when the computer is inactive for" and drag the bottom slider to set the timing for putting the display to sleep.
To put only the computer's hard disk to sleep whenever it's inactive, select the checkbox labeled "Put the hard disk(s) to sleep when possible."
To wake your computer from sleep, press a key on the keyboard or click the mouse.

To set a daily schedule for putting your computer to sleep (or turning it off and on), click Schedule and select options.

You can set more detailed options for waking and restarting your computer in the Options pane of Energy Saver preferences.

On iBooks and PowerBooks, the computer automatically sleeps when you close the lid.

For more information about putting your computer to sleep, click "Tell me more."[/acctab]{/jgaccordion}

Notes:
To open Power Options, click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click Power Options.
You might want to save your work before putting your computer on standby. While the computer is on standby, information in computer memory is not saved to your hard disk. If there is an interruption in power, information in memory is lost.
To create a new power scheme, specify the time settings you want, and then click Save As.
If you're using a portable computer, you can specify one setting for battery power and a different setting for AC power.
To put your computer on standby, you must have a computer that is set up by the manufacturer to support this option.
Using Power Options in Control Panel, you can adjust any power management option that your computer's unique hardware configuration supports. Because these options may vary widely from computer to computer, the options described may differ from what you see. Power Options automatically detects what is available on your computer and shows you only the options that you can control.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________


2. Arrow The Dollars and "Sense" of Green Campus Computing

http://www.ccra.org/2009/profile.asp?SESSION_ID=2889&SESSION_DT=4/27/2009

Event Details & Description

Rising utility costs are forcing college officials to rethink ways of operating schools more efficiently. With technology costs making up a significant portion of those electricity and cooling costs, there are many strategies schools can adopt that will generate a noticeable return on investment. Green computing is no longer just an ideal goal for educators, but is today becoming a way to provide measurable ROI for cost saving measures. Such strategies include replacement of older, more energy consuming devices such as CRT monitors and CPUs, power management software and thin client computing. From the student's perspective, energy management software, more efficient hardware, and even more environmentally-friendly consumer packaging models are helping to lower environmental concerns with technology while also lowering costs. Not only do such strategies save schools significantly from power savings, but they also deliver a better experience for students and staff. Participants will learn more about these strategies as well as learn how to access energy calculators to determine potential savings from adopting certain energy efficient strategies.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________


3. Arrow The Alliance to Save Energy’s Green Campus Program

http://ase.org/content/article/detail/3037

Program Goals

The Alliance to Save Energy’s Green Campus Program is a student-led initiative that educates the campus community on energy efficiency; achieves energy savings; and encourages the next generation of energy efficiency professionals by:
Realizing measurable energy savings through research, educational campaigns, technology projects, and facilitation of retrofits;
Supporting green workforce development through training, mentoring, and integrated academic curricula, internships, and project-based learning;
Fostering ongoing awareness about the relationship between energy and the environment;
Developing and implementing campus energy efficiency policy and action;
Creating effective and lasting partnerships among students, faculty, administrators, and staff within and across campuses.
Program Structure and Resources

Green Campus interns work closely with administrators, faculty, and staff to create a strategic plan that addresses each of the program’s goals and is uniquely tailored to the needs, challenges, and strengths of their school.
Green Campus is a student-driven program; each Green Campus school has funding for forty hours of intern time per week.
The Alliance to Save Energy recruits, selects, and oversees between two and four interns per campus; with supervision from Alliance staff, and input from campus staff, these interns are primarily responsible for the day-to-day implementation of Green Campus at their school.
The Alliance supports Green Campus interns through continuous remote consultation, regular on-campus visits, and bi- annual program-wide convergences.
Interns at Green Campus schools have an operating budget that they use to secure space for events, incentivize student conservation, and purchase new metering equipment.
Program Rationale

Educational campaigns can result in significant energy savings by changing behaviors and purchasing decisions.
Students are effective advocates on college campus, able to reach their peers and high-level decision makers.
Students can offer valuable assistance in greening campus operating procedures; student research can defer information gathering costs inherent in switching from conventional to more sustainable practices.
Green Campus enriches students' educational experience while allowing them to take more responsibility for campus operations.




__________________________________________________________________________________________






Ways how the university can adopt this concept:

-When you're not using your computer, you can save energy by putting it to "sleep." When your computer is in sleep, it's turned on but in a low power mode.
-To automatically put your computer on standby.
-To set a daily schedule for putting your computer to sleep (or turning it off and on), click Schedule and select options.
-implementing the proper policies and regulations in conserving energy.
- turn off other appliances which is not being use like (computer,television,etc.)
-If you're using a portable computer, you can specify one setting for battery power and a different setting for AC power.


for us as a student in order to adopt the concept of green computing campus we must learn first how to "manage" ourself in that way our personality reflects in our environment/sorroundings. Managing our own is means a lot of us, it can help us to be more responsibility and to be a better person.

to adopt it in our campus, i think much better to set / implement first some rules / regulations to each our lab. , let them know what are the advantages of having the "Green Computing Campus" maybe in that way it can incourage other students to follow, not for the campus benefit but also for them to manage thier own cheers ..




+GOD BLESS+


Last edited by Russel John Serrano on Wed Jul 15, 2009 2:02 am; edited 1 time in total
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amielou.falcon

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PostSubject: URL's that talk's about "green campus computing"   Sun Jul 05, 2009 4:02 pm

No No
At the current era, IT is undeniably at its way up. High, advanced and fast-changing technologies arise as fast as a blink of an eye.

Arrow http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html

The growing use of computers on campus has caused a dramatic increase in energy consumption, putting negative pressure on CU’s budget and the environment. Each year more and more computers are purchased and put to use, but it’s not just the number of computers that is driving energy consumption upward. The way that we use computers also adds to the increasing energy burden.

Here are some tested suggestions that may make it possible for you to reduce your computer energy consumption by 80 percent or more while still retaining most or all productivity and other benefits of your computer system, including network connectivity.
bounce Screen savers save no energy
If screen saver images appear on your monitor for more than 5 minutes, you are wasting energy! Screen saver programs may save the phosphors in your monitor screen, but this is not really a concern with newer monitors, especially LCD screens. And they do not save any energy.

A screen saver that displays moving images causes your monitor to consume as much as electricity as it does when in active use. These screen saver programs also involve system interaction with your CPU that results in additional energy consumption. A blank screen saver is slightly better but even that only reduces monitor energy consumption by a few percent.

bounce Enable power management features
Thanks to the U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA), personal computer systems purchased today can be easy on energy. These “Energy Star” computers and monitors can be programmed to automatically “power-down” to a low power state when they are not being used. These efficiency gains can be achieved without any sacrifice in computing performance.

The EPA has estimated that providing computers with “sleep mode” reduces their energy use by 60 to 70 percent – and ultimately could save enough electricity each year to power Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine, cut electric bills by $2 billion, and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by the equivalent of 5 million cars.

Follow these simple steps to access computer and monitor power management features for Macintosh and Windows.

Macintosh:

* From any application select the Apple menu
* Select “System Preferences...” (OS X) or “Control Panels” (OS 9) and then click on “Energy Saver”

Windows:

* Point your cursor at the desktop background and right-click
* Choose “Properties” from the pop up menu
* Go to the “Screen Saver” page; in the lower right-hand corner near the ENERGY STAR® logo click the “Settings” button. This brings up another dialog box where you choose power management settings.

If you are running on a different operating system or have difficulties, call ITS at 303-735-HELP for enabling instructions.

The recommended settings are 20 minutes for monitor sleep and 30 minutes for system sleep. Remember that to save energy with your monitor’s built-in power management system, your monitor must go to sleep (shut itself down).

For more conservation tips and PC power options visit Facilities Management’s Resource Conservation news page, and then click on “PC Power Options.”

When not in use, turn off the juice
This is the most basic energy conservation strategy for any type of equipment. Consider the following:

* Turn off your computer and/or peripherals when they are not in use. Turning on and off will not harm the equipment.
* Don’t run computers continuously unless they are in use continuously.
* Turn off at night and on weekends
* Look for ways to reduce the amount of time your computer is on without adversely affecting your productivity.

bounce You Can Turn Your Computer Off!
The common misconception that a computer’s life is shortened by turning it on and off has led some to leave computers on all the time. Others are reluctant to switch their computers on and off a couple times during their workday despite only using this equipment for a fraction of that time.

Desktop computers are designed to protect the internal circutry from power damage from on/off switching. Turning PC equipment off at night or on and off a few times a day will not appreciably affect its useful life. Electronic equipment life is a function of operating hours and heat — both these factors are reduced when equipment is switched off. Modern hard drives are designed and tested to operate reliably for thousands of on/off cycles.

Thus, you CAN turn off your computer (and monitor and printer)! The inconvenience of waiting a minute or two for a computer to reboot or peripheral to come on line may be trivial compared to the energy savings achieved by keeping computer equipment off when not in use.

Some specific suggestions

* Unless you require immediate access to e-mail or other Internet services, break the habit of turning on all your computer equipment as soon as you enter the office each day.
* If practical, informally group your computer activities and try to do then during one or two parts of the day, leaving the computer off at other times.
* Avoid using the switch on a powerstrip to turn on all your equipment.
* If you use a laser printer, don’t turn your printer on until you are ready to print.
* Turn off your entire computer system (CPU, monitor and printer) or at least your monitor and printer when you go to lunch or will be out of office for a meeting or an errand.
* For “computer servers” which must be on to serve network functions, explore ways to turn servers off at night.
* If monitors are not needed for “servers” to operate, keep server monitors off. If server monitor is needed during the day, at least turn it off at night and weekends.

While the energy saving suggestions listed above are appropriate for many campus PC users, some of the suggestions may be inappropriate for certain computer applications or work situations. When in doubt, discuss possible energy conservation measures with your colleagues, supervisor, or computer lab director to determine which steps can be taken without harming productivity.

Our energy conservation program will not work without your help. Be an energy educator and gently remind your co-workers and colleagues to save energy by changing their computer habits. Circulate this booklet among the members in your office or department. Gain the support of your supervisor and set up a brief meeting to discuss how to implement energy saving strategies.

Arrow http://www.edtechmag.com/higher/september-october-2007/seeing-green.html

Seeing Green
Adelphi University finds seven ways to save power.
bounce 1. Power Down: The first part of the plan was merely to flip the switch. A year and a half ago, the department made the simple adjustment of shutting down 700 lab computers at midnight rather than letting them run all night. Chen says that saved the university $100,000 per year in energy costs. “We give instruction in the computer labs until 10 p.m.,” says Chen. “But sometimes students hang around after the instruction.”

bounce 2. Switch to Blades: Chen’s department is also moving from standalone servers to an IBM blade center. After comparing servers from Hewlett-Packard and other vendors, Chen chose IBM because the department’s software and information systems are IBM-based. “Sticking with IBM reduces our training requirements,” says Chen, who expects about $50,000 a year in energy savings from the move to blades.

bounce 3. Make Virtualization a Reality: Also in the works is a transition to VMware’s ESX virtualization software. “The virtualization software sits right on top of bare metal and emulates hardware, so we can run multiple operating systems, or multiple virtual machines, on a single blade system,” Hicks says. “Essentially one physical blade will allow me to run eight virtual systems.” Thanks to ESX, Hicks foresees being able to run from 40 to 50 virtual sessions on the new blade center.

bounce 4. Consolidate Storage: Centralizing storage was also part of the plan. “Each of those 60 servers has direct attached storage, so you have to manage the storage individually in each system,” explains Hicks. Combining that into a storage area network (SAN) results in one storage area for all files. “It’s going to give us a single point of management and it’s going to be only six devices, shrinking our overall hardware footprint.

bounce 5. Stay Cool: A new cooling system, installed last year, has also helped the department cut energy consumption. Four five-ton units now do the work of two 10-ton units. “We run three units and do what we call ‘exercising,’ where we can rotate and alternate, so the hardware is not running all the time,” says Hicks. The blade center will also help equalize the temperature in the room, according to Chen. “With all the servers on one side, one side of the room was always hot and the other side was always cold,” he says.

bounce 6. Save Paper: Chen says they’ve also involved students in their conservation efforts by limiting the number of pages they can print to 500 per student per semester. “Before, there was paper all over the place,” Chen says. “Now, we’re saving not just on paper costs, but on toner, repairs and the labor costs associated with the constant restocking of paper.”

bounce 7. Easy on the Gas: Finally, the department has converted from gas- to electric-powered vehicles to transport computers around campus. “Adelphi is spread across 74 acres, so moving PCs around is a big deal,” Chen explains. “Switching to electric is also good for the environment.”

Arrow http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm
Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.

Those were a few of the ideas discussed last week at a conference, "Greening the Internet Economy," that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event, held by the University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.

Many of the participants emphasized the importance of systems that could more intelligently measure energy use on the campus. In recent years, colleges have been hurt by the rising costs of powering and cooling their data centers, in part because those costs are difficult to measure and poorly understood (The Chronicle, January 9).

At San Diego, researchers have started work on hardware to help colleges and other organizations understand how to make their servers more efficient. The device, called the GreenLight Instrument, will deploy sensors and software to measure the energy use, humidity, and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Data Center, a popular, self-contained complex of servers.

The goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption, said Thomas A. DeFanti, principal investigator on the project and a senior research strategist at the university's California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology.

suggestion:
study our campus is not alone in its move toward green IT, but it is in the minority right now.
an initial step is within us students, sunny let us be all concerned about this scenario. alien green campus computing alien
maybe our institution should try to adopt a campus policy to reduce energy use per square foot of campus building, with a goal of stabilizing or reducing total energy consumption and emissions. One of the key actionable measures is enabling desktop power management features. king
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Gabrielle Anne Rae Deseo

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Sun Jul 05, 2009 6:53 pm

Green Campus Computing.. Ü


First I got this definition of green computing from Wikipedia.

“Green computing is the study and practice of using computing resources efficiently. The primary objective of such a program is to account for the triple bottom line, an expanded spectrum of values and criteria for measuring organizational (and societal) success. The goals are similar to green chemistry; reduce the use of hazardous materials, maximize energy efficiency during the product's lifetime, and promote recyclability or biodegradability of defunct products and factory waste.
Modern IT systems rely upon a complicated mix of people, networks and hardware; as such, a green computing initiative must be systemic in nature, and address increasingly sophisticated problems. Elements of such a solution may comprise items such as end user satisfaction, management restructuring, regulatory compliance, disposal of electronic waste, telecommuting, virtualization of server resources, energy use, thin client solutions, and return on investment (ROI).”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_computing

Now here are 3 URL’s that talks about green Campus computing

http://www.beloit.edu/isr/greencomputing.php#GreenComputing
From Beloit College


What is Green Computing?
Green computing is the environmentally responsible use of technology.

What can I do to “green” my technology use?
•Enable power management on your computer.
•Power down the computer and monitor when not in use.
•Consider plugging your computer and peripherals into a power strip with an on/off switch and turn the entire power strip off when not in use.
•Think before you print. Do you really need a paper copy?
•Use recycled paper if possible
•Use Print Preview to review your job before printing it
•Print in black and white whenever possible.
•Print two-sided whenever possible.
•Reuse unnecessary print jobs as scratch paper.
•Advertise events, parties, etc. electronically or with chalk instead of print-outs.
•Recycle!
○Use the recycling bins around campus to recycle paper, glass, aluminum, and plastic
○Toner on campus can be brought to ISR for recycling
○Beloit College computers and laptop batteries can be brought to ISR for recycling
○Recycle used alkaline batteries in Pearsons by the mail center or in the Library
•Use email instead of faxes
•If you are in the market for a new computer at home, consider buying an Energy Star compliant computer
•If it’s possible, download software from the web instead of purchasing a physical installation disc

How can I change my computer’s settings to be more green?
What is Power management and how does it help?
Every day energy is wasted by computers and monitors that are left on when not in use. By simply putting the hard drive and monitor to sleep after a short period of inactivity, huge energy savings can be realized. The computer should wake up with a quick click of the mouse or by pressing a key on the keyboard. In some cases, you will need to press the power button briefly to wake the computer up. Also, be sure to shut down your computer before leaving for the day and over weekends. Use this handy calculator to get an idea of how much energy and money can be saved.

http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html
From University of Colorado Environmental Center

The growing use of computers on campus has caused a dramatic increase in energy consumption, putting negative pressure on CU’s budget and the environment. Each year more and more computers are purchased and put to use, but it’s not just the number of computers that is driving energy consumption upward. The way that we use computers also adds to the increasing energy burden.
Research reveals that most personal desktop computers are not being used the majority of the time they are running and many personal computers nationwide are needlessly left on continuously. Every time we leave computers or lights on we waste electricity. Burning fossil fuels generates most of our electricity and it also emits pollutants, sulfur, and carbon dioxide into the air. These emissions can cause respiratory disease, smog, acid rain and global climate change.
Over the last fifteen years, computers have transformed the academic and administrative landscape at the University of Colorado. There are now over 18,000 computers on campus. Personal computers (PC) operation alone may directly account for nearly $550,000 per year in University energy costs.
Computers generate heat and require additional cooling which adds to energy costs. Thus, the overall energy cost of CU’s personal computers is more likely around $700,000.
Meeting computer cooling needs in summer (and winter) often compromises the efficient use of building cooling and heating systems by requiring colder fan discharge temperatures. In the summer, these temperatures may satisfy computer lab cooling needs while overcooling other spaces.
Given CU’s commitment to energy conservation and the environmental stewardship, we must address the issue of responsible computer use. By adopting conserving practices, annual savings of $300,000-400,000 are possible.
How Much Energy Does Your Computer System Use?A typical desktop PC system is comprised of the computer itself (the CPU or the “box”), a monitor, and printer. Your CPU may require approximately 100 watts of electrical power. Add 50-150 watts for a 15-17 inch monitor, proportionately more for larger monitors. The power requirements of conventional laser printers can be as much as 100 watts or more when printing though much less if idling in a “sleep mode.” Ink jet printers use as little as 12 watts while printing and 5 watts while idling.

http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm
From The Chronicles of Higher Education

Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money
By JOSH KELLER

Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves. Those were a few of the ideas discussed last week at a conference, "Greening the Internet Economy," that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event, held
by the University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.
Many of the participants emphasized the importance of systems that could more intelligently measure energy use on the campus. In recent years, colleges have been hurt by the rising costs of powering and cooling their data centers, in part because those costs are difficult to measure and poorly understood (The Chronicle, January 9).
At San Diego, researchers have started work on hardware to help colleges and other organizations understand how to make their servers more efficient. The device, called the GreenLight Instrument, will deploy sensors and software to measure the energy use, humidity, and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Data Center, a popular, self-contained complex of servers.
The goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption, said Thomas A. DeFanti, principal investigator on the project and a senior research strategist at the university's California Institute for
Telecommunications and Information Technology.
"Right now there isn't enough information for somebody to make a definitive decision: Where do I save my money? Do I eliminate disks in my computers, or do I stop them? Do I use more RAM or less RAM?" said Mr. DeFanti. "Nobody has detailed information on this."
Aiming for Precision
Intelligent measuring systems like Greenlight should be extended to allow engineers to more precisely determine how to use energy, said Gary L. Baldwin, director of special projects at the University of California's Citris program. For example, he said, operators at a data center could direct cool air only where the facility is generating the most heat.
Another idea that shows promise, participants said, is to supply computers directly with local DC power. Computers generally use direct current, but the public electricity grid typically supplies alternating current, and 30 percent of the electricity can be lost in the conversion of one form to the other.
Some colleges have started projects to power their computers directly from solar cells or other sources of DC power on the campus, avoiding the energy loss altogether. At San Diego, administrators hope to build a "power ring" that will supply computers across the campus with DC power, said Mr. DeFanti.
The rethinking of how to supply campus power is part of a broader effort to "divorce ourselves from the electrical grid," said Bill St. Arnaud, chief research officer at Canarie Inc., a Canadian computer-networking organization. Power-transmission lines lose a significant amount of energy over long distances, he said, which means that supplying a campus with energy from faraway power plant can be inefficient. A better strategy, Mr. St. Arnaud said, is to build campus data centers next to a renewable source of power, like a solar plant. High-speed optical transmission lines, he said, would ensure that the computers would seem "as close as next door."

My View...
This Green Campus Computing is really a great way to save and protect our environment and it would be good if this will be implemented in the school. But it is not easy to do this right away with just a snap of a finger. I know USEP could implement this if all of us in the university would cooperate with each other. Everything could be achieved if there is cooperation.

For the university to adopt this green campus computing I would suggest we first try to do it at home. Each of us could start to conserve energy not just on computers but other electrical appliances by turning it of and unplugging it when not in use. We could be used of this habit and eventually bring it at school. In the university, example after a class in the computer laboratory, computers are not unplugged after a session because it will be used by the following section. But then I believe there are still some ways to conserve energy. I have also read in an article that screen savers could also consume much energy so as much as possible we should not anymore put screen savers in our computers. Adopting green campus computing is not an easy task but I believe when there is cooperation this could actually be implemented soon after.



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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:15 pm

It has been three months past since March, when numbers of programs and marches were held to celebrate the earth day here in the Philippines. That one hour of darkness, that covers the houses of every participating household for the earth hour, which took place from 8:00 pm to 9:00 pm of the 28th day of March, 2009, was indeed a great deep breath for the earth. But, can’t we keep the earth from suffocating?

From smoking cigarettes to huge amount of carbon dioxide produced by factories, it is such a shame what we have done to earth. We have taken so much from the nature ranging from the lands where trees used to grow until stealing the wings of the birds. Thus, the pollution from sea to sky is now evident, that even a simple wind grows to destroy and murder numbers of household. The plague that we are experiencing right now and the rapid spread of sickness, isn’t it yet time to realize what we’ve done?

As an Information Technology student, I can say that the growth of Technology has pushed the nature to breathe in smokes. Since technology holds the biggest responsibility, let us make it as the best medium to spread the words to keep the earth from dying. As students, we can spread the words to our friends, classmates and suggest it to our schools or campuses. Here are some sites that may serve as a guide for your school:

  • http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm
    http://www.eschoolnews.com/news/top-news/news-by-subject/school-administration/index.cfm?i=53933
    http://www.brighthub.com/environment/green-computing/articles/14645.aspx


As a summary of the three links I’ve given above, schools are said to be one of the top sources of pollution. Many other schools have chosen to green their IT departments, which are the source of most energy consumption thus, distributing to lessen the pollution. There are many ways are school can help and be one of these green campus who have seen the good side of being green and how much energy they will save. There are many simple ways our school can start with, like switching off computers whenever it is possible or if nobody’s using it, it goes the same as for lights and electric fans and aircons, and segregate waste to recyclable and non-recycrable. And we, as students of our campus, lets try not to throw our garbage anywhere, especially on canals. As from what we all know, we always tend to experience flood everytime huge rain falls. We can always start with small and simple acts thus, drops of water makes up a glass of water.
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PostSubject: Assignment 4 :GCC   Mon Jul 06, 2009 4:55 am

=============================================================================================================================

http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm

Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money

By JOSH KELLER


Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.

Those were a few of the ideas discussed last week at a conference, "Greening the Internet Economy," that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event, held by the University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.

Many of the participants emphasized the importance of systems that could more intelligently measure energy use on the campus. In recent years, colleges have been hurt by the rising costs of powering and cooling their data centers, in part because those costs are difficult to measure and poorly understood (The Chronicle, January 9).

At San Diego, researchers have started work on hardware to help colleges and other organizations understand how to make their servers more efficient. The device, called the GreenLight Instrument, will deploy sensors and software to measure the energy use, humidity, and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Data Center, a popular, self-contained complex of servers.

The goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption, said Thomas A. DeFanti, principal investigator on the project and a senior research strategist at the university's California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology.

"Right now there isn't enough information for somebody to make a definitive decision: Where do I save my money? Do I eliminate disks in my computers, or do I stop them? Do I use more RAM or less RAM?" said Mr. DeFanti. "Nobody has detailed information on this."...

=============================================================================================================================


http://www.edtechmag.com/higher/september-october-2007/seeing-green.html

Seeing Green
Adelphi University finds seven ways to save power.

Nancy A. Feldman

Whoever says it isn’t easy being green doesn’t know Jack. Jack Chen, that is. As CIO of Adelphi University in Garden City, N.Y., Chen recently revamped his department as part of a campuswide effort to go green that began three years ago. Aptly named the Green Campus Initiative, the plan is all-encompassing, from the use of organic fertilizers to environmentally smart building design.

The plan was so thorough that the information technology part of it alone included at least seven pieces, including traditional IT items such as more efficient use of hardware and software, as well as policies and even logistics. At least several of these processes would be applicable on any campus.

1. Power Down: The first part of the plan was merely to flip the switch. A year and a half ago, the department made the simple adjustment of shutting down 700 lab computers at midnight rather than letting them run all night. Chen says that saved the university $100,000 per year in energy costs. “We give instruction in the computer labs until 10 p.m.,” says Chen. “But sometimes students hang around after the instruction.”

2. Switch to Blades: Chen’s department is also moving from standalone servers to an IBM blade center. After comparing servers from Hewlett-Packard and other vendors, Chen chose IBM because the department’s software and information systems are IBM-based. “Sticking with IBM reduces our training requirements,” says Chen, who expects about $50,000 a year in energy savings from the move to blades.

Switching to the blade center is the department’s summer project, explains associate director of network and systems Fred Hicks. “We’ve got about 40 to 60 servers, and each one is an individual computer that runs a very heavy CPU load,” he says. “It takes electricity, hard drives and resources for each individual system. The blade center has 14 slots so you can run 14 concurrent blades. We’re going to be installing eight, so we have room to grow.”

3. Make Virtualization a Reality: Also in the works is a transition to VMware’s ESX virtualization software. “The virtualization software sits right on top of bare metal and emulates hardware, so we can run multiple operating systems, or multiple virtual machines, on a single blade system,” Hicks says. “Essentially one physical blade will allow me to run eight virtual systems.” Thanks to ESX, Hicks foresees being able to run from 40 to 50 virtual sessions on the new blade center.

The shift to virtualization software will enable the department to get full use out of the hardware. “When you have a server running a process, let’s say e-mail, it’s just sitting there processing mail, and its resources are averaging only 5 to 15 percent of what it can do,” Hicks says. “By combining processes from different physical systems onto a virtual system, you’re combining that 15 percent overhead with another 15 percent and another 15 percent until you get 100 percent utilization of your system.”

4. Consolidate Storage: Centralizing storage was also part of the plan. “Each of those 60 servers has direct attached storage, so you have to manage the storage individually in each system,” explains Hicks. Combining that into a storage area network (SAN) results in one storage area for all files. “It’s going to give us a single point of management and it’s going to be only six devices, shrinking our overall hardware footprint.

5. Stay Cool: A new cooling system, installed last year, has also helped the department cut energy consumption. Four five-ton units now do the work of two 10-ton units. “We run three units and do what we call ‘exercising,’ where we can rotate and alternate, so the hardware is not running all the time,” says Hicks. The blade center will also help equalize the temperature in the room, according to Chen. “With all the servers on one side, one side of the room was always hot and the other side was always cold,” he says.

6. Save Paper: Chen says they’ve also involved students in their conservation efforts by limiting the number of pages they can print to 500 per student per semester. “Before, there was paper all over the place,” Chen says. “Now, we’re saving not just on paper costs, but on toner, repairs and the labor costs associated with the constant restocking of paper.”

7. Easy on the Gas: Finally, the department has converted from gas- to electric-powered vehicles to transport computers around campus. “Adelphi is spread across 74 acres, so moving PCs around is a big deal,” Chen explains. “Switching to electric is also good for the environment.”


=============================================================================================================================


http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html#other


You can take a giant step toward environmentally responsible or “green” computing by conserving energy with your computer. But green computing involves other important steps as well. These pertain to paper use, toner cartridges, disposal of old computer equipment and purchasing decisions when considering new computer equipment.

Reducing Paper Waste
Rather than creating a paperless office, computer use has vastly increased paper consumption and paper waste. Here are some suggestions for reducing waste:

* Print as little as possible. Review and modify documents on the screen and use print preview. Minimize the number of hard copies and paper drafts you make. Instead of printing, save information to disks.
* Recycle waste paper.
* Buy and use recycled paper in your printers and copiers. From an environmental point of view, the best recycled paper is 100 percent post consumer recycled content. For more information about obtaining recycled paper at CU, contact the CU Book Store 303-492-6411. For large orders, contact Distribution Services at 303-492-6524 or visit them online.
* Save e-mail whenever possible and avoid needless printing of e-mail messages.
* Use e-mail instead of faxes or send faxes directly from your computer to eliminate the need for a hard copy. When you must fax using hard copies, save paper using a “sticky” fax address note and not a cover sheet.
* On larger documents, use smaller font sizes (consistent with readability) to save paper.
* If your printer prints a test page whenever it is turned on, disable this unnecessary feature.
* Before recycling paper, which has print on only one side, set it aside for use as scrap paper or in printing drafts.
* When documents are printed or copied, use double-sided printing and copying. If possible, use the multiple pages per sheet option on printer properties.
* When general information-type documents must be shared within an office, try circulating them instead of making an individual copy for each person. This can also be done easily by e-mail.


===========================================================================================================================

**ways how the university can adopt GREEN CAMPUS COMPUTING**


-implementing the proper policies and regulations in conserving energy
-students must also follow proper policies and regulations in conserving energy
-educate the students about the right ways of using devices that could increase the rate of pollution when neglected especially in disposal of unused devices
-reusing and recycling materials inside the campus

Most of the ways and techniques our campus must possses are mentioned above especially in computer saving tips.It's just up to us to follow the ways and prove to other campuses in the Philippines or even outside that USePians are disciplined students and responsible enough to follow the rules and regulations when it comes to CAMPUS COMPUTING.

=============================================================================================================================
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PostSubject: Green Campus Computing   Mon Jul 06, 2009 6:10 pm

Here are some url's that talk about Green Campus Computing:

1.) In University of Alberta

About this initiative

The Vice-Provost (Information Technology) encourages all computer users to apply green computing practices to ensure that our use of information technologies is sustainable. This site and the Green Computing Initiative contribute to the larger energy management programs at the University of Alberta.

Fall 2009 marks the beginning of the Green Computing Initiative at the University of Alberta. During this first year, the Green Computing Initiative will focus on achieving the following:

* Increasing the daily use of green computing practices by faculty and staff.
* Educating administrators about the merits of ENERGY STAR computers.
* Informing administrators about viable ways to extend the life of computers.
* Educating purchasers about appropriate computers for different types of work.
* Pilot testing ways to enhance the energy efficiency and cost effectiveness of local area networks and data centres.

All of us can contribute to the environmental sustainability of the University of Alberta. Through partnering as part of the Green Computing Initiative, we can all contribute towards information technology practices that will not exhaust the earth's resources.

visit this site for more information:
http://www.vpit.ualberta.ca/green/index.php?ref=about

2.)Green Computing: Using IT Automation to Achieve Energy Efficiency

Overview: The concern over the environmental impact of the increased usage of computing technology has far reaching ramifications on the sustainability of business IT operations. Already increasing energy costs and expanding power utilization needs are having a direct impact on business profitability. Add to this the social concerns over the global climate crisis and conservation efforts that have led to regulatory compliance initiatives, and businesses are increasingly pressured to find new solutions to ensuring IT business implementations are more eco-friendly. Green Computing, or Green IT, is the practice of implementing policies and procedures that improve the efficiency of computing resources in such a way as to reduce the environmental impact of their utilization.

visit this site for more information:
http://whitepapers.techrepublic.com.com/abstract.aspx?docid=1022065

3.) Green Computing

The University of Hertfordshire, recognised as a sector leader in environmental management, has been awarded funding from the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) for a project to incorporate green technologies into the refurbishment of the de Havilland Campus Data Centre in 2009.

This pioneering Reduction And Re-use of Energy in Institutional Data Centres (RARE-IDC) aims to provide world-class innovation in the use of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in Higher Education.

visit this site for more information:
http://www.herts.ac.uk/about-us/facilities/learning-resources/about-lis/rare-idc/home.cfm


.... as an IT student, i must be aware of today's IT operations. To sustain and develop the business IT operations, energy cost is also increasing and the need for power utilization is expanding which leads to direct impact to business success. in order to lessen the energy cost and the usage of power, Green Campus Computing concepts can be applied in different universities, IT experts, business people and etc.. Here are some idea about GREEN COMPUTING according to wikipedia, Green computing is the study and practice of using computing resources efficiently. The primary objective of such a program is to account for the triple bottom line, an expanded spectrum of values and criteria for measuring organizational (and societal) success. The goals are similar to green chemistry; reduce the use of hazardous materials, maximize energy efficiency during the product's lifetime, and promote recyclability or biodegradability of defunct products and factory waste. Modern IT systems rely upon a complicated mix of people, networks and hardware; as such, a green computing initiative must be systemic in nature, and address increasingly sophisticated problems. Elements of such a solution may comprise items such as end user satisfaction, management restructuring, regulatory compliance, disposal of electronic waste, telecommuting, virtualization of server resources, energy use, thin client solutions, and return on investment (ROI). The imperative for companies to take control of their power consumption, for technology and more generally, therefore remains acute. One of the most effective power management tools available in 2009 may still be simple, plain, common sense.
Here are some of my suggestions on how Universities can apply the concept of GREEN CAMPUS COMPUTING:
*First of all, the role model of the Green Campus Computing in the said Universities are the administration, faculty and staff/teachers. By their guidance and administration, this concept will be easily applied by everyone in the University. All of the members of the University specially the students and staffs who are constantly using computers and other technologies that consumes power and energy should be aware of this program, the goal and concepts of the program should be discussed and understood.
*Next, everyone should participate/cooperate in this program. All of us should understand the concept of it and apply it in our daily lives. All of us should be responsible in conserving energy and help the mother earth! Through this, all of us are the beneficiary.
*Lastly, each one of us are the model in conserving energy. Let spread this program and teach other about this. let us decrease the cost and improve competitiveness.

God bless us all!

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PostSubject: 3 URL's that talk's about "green campus computing"   Mon Jul 06, 2009 6:49 pm

Green computing is the study and practice of using computing resources efficiently. The primary objective of such a program is to account for the triple bottom line, an expanded spectrum of values and criteria for measuring organizational (and societal) success. The goals are similar to green chemistry; reduce the use of hazardous materials, maximize energy efficiency during the product's lifetime, and promote recyclability or biodegradability of defunct products and factory waste.

Modern IT systems rely upon a complicated mix of people, networks and hardware; as such, a green computing initiative must be systemic in nature, and address increasingly sophisticated problems. Elements of such a solution may comprise items such as end user satisfaction, management restructuring, regulatory compliance, disposal of electronic waste, telecommuting, virtualization of server resources, energy use, thin client solutions, and return on investment (ROI).

The imperative for companies to take control of their power consumption, for technology and more generally, therefore remains acute. One of the most effective power management tools available in 2009 may still be simple, plain, common sense.

The 3 url's about "green campus computing":


http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html

Green Computing Guide

The growing use of computers on campus has caused a dramatic increase in energy consumption, putting negative pressure on CU’s budget and the environment. Each year more and more computers are purchased and put to use, but it’s not just the number of computers that is driving energy consumption upward. The way that we use computers also adds to the increasing energy burden.

Research reveals that most personal desktop computers are not being used the majority of the time they are running and many personal computers nationwide are needlessly left on continuously. Every time we leave computers or lights on we waste electricity. Burning fossil fuels generates most of our electricity and it also emits pollutants, sulfur, and carbon dioxide into the air. These emissions can cause respiratory disease, smog, acid rain and global climate change.

Computer Operating Costs

Over the last fifteen years, computers have transformed the academic and administrative landscape at the University of Colorado. There are now over 18,000 computers on campus. Personal computers (PC) operation alone may directly account for nearly $550,000 per year in University energy costs.

Computers generate heat and require additional cooling which adds to energy costs. Thus, the overall energy cost of CU’s personal computers is more likely around $700,000.

Meeting computer cooling needs in summer (and winter) often compromises the efficient use of building cooling and heating systems by requiring colder fan discharge temperatures. In the summer, these temperatures may satisfy computer lab cooling needs while overcooling other spaces.

Given CU’s commitment to energy conservation and the environmental stewardship, we must address the issue of responsible computer use. By adopting conserving practices, annual savings of $300,000-400,000 are possible.

How Much Energy Does Your Computer System Use?
A typical desktop PC system is comprised of the computer itself (the CPU or the “box”), a monitor, and printer. Your CPU may require approximately 100 watts of electrical power. Add 50-150 watts for a 15-17 inch monitor, proportionately more for larger monitors. The power requirements of conventional laser printers can be as much as 100 watts or more when printing though much less if idling in a “sleep mode.” Ink jet printers use as little as 12 watts while printing and 5 watts while idling.

How a user operates the computer also factors into energy costs. First let’s take the worst case scenario, continuous operation. Assuming you operate a 200 watt PC system day and night everyday, direct annual electrical costs would be over $125 (at $0.075/kWh). In contrast, if you operate your system just during normal business hours, say 40 hours per week, the direct annual energy cost would be about $30 – plus, of course, the cost of providing additional cooling.

Considering the tremendous benefits of computer use, neither of the above cost figures may seem like much, but think of what happens when these costs are multiplied by the many thousands of computers in use at CU. The energy waste dollars add up quickly.

http://technologysource.org/article/campus_computing_project/

The Campus Computing Project: An Interview with Kenneth C. Green

What prompted you to initiate the Campus Computing Survey?

The Campus Computing Project, including the annual Campus Computing Survey, was launched in 1990. At that time there really were no national data about the issue of information technology (IT) planning and policy in the context of instructional and scholarly technology.

The mission of the Project has always been to serve the campus community by providing information that will aid and inform campus IT programs, planning, and policy-making. The model has been to follow "the Gretsky rule": as you may know, Wayne Gretsky once commented that as a hockey player, what made him successful was that he skated to where the puck is going, not to where the puck is currently. The Project's activities have been to understand where the puck is and to collect data that helps us all understand where the "digital puck" is going.

Where is the puck going with the use of information technology tools on college and university campuses?

The puck is going in several directions. In one sense we are coming to the end of an era—what I would call the initial phase of a two-decade long initiative focused on IT and instruction.

If you think about the recent history of technology in higher education, the current cycle really began around 1984 when some campuses, working with Apple and IBM, began computer resale programs in their bookstores, selling desktop computers—microcomputers—to students at a significant discount. By doing so these campuses, in essence, made an implicit promise to undergraduates about the role of technology in the curriculum. The resale programs, coupled with other early campus investments to support IT in the curriculum, were a significant policy statement that computers were not just for computer science or engineering students, but in fact a resource for all students in any and all majors.

The survey data indicate that instructional integration has been and remains a key IT issue for all institutions. The 2002 survey data document the growing use of technology in the curriculum across all sectors of the campus community (Figure 1). This year's survey data also confirm the role of Course Management Software or Learning Management Software (CMS/LMS resources) as a key component of the IT infrastructure across all sectors of American higher education (Figure 2). The data also document the emerging role of wireless technologies in campus IT planning and services (Figure 3).

We are also seeing a subtle but important shift in current campus IT priorities, suggesting that this is a time when campuses are trying to consolidate some of the continuing instructional IT activity but not launch significant new initiatives. Instead, many campuses seem focused on the administrative side of the house as the campus community experiences the transition of what we used to call "administrative computing" towards a new enterprise resource planning (ERP) model that involves fully integrated information systems: student databases, financial information, human resources, alumni data, donors and development, and the like.

For example, I think it is significant that this year, for the first time, our respondents in public and private research universities identify "ERP upgrade/replacement" as the "single most important IT issue confronting my institution over the next two-three years." In contrast, for the past four years, across all sectors, the leading response to this question on our annual survey has been "instructional integration," followed by "user support".

http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=23&Itemid=40

PUTTING YOUR COMPUTER TO SLEEP

When you're not using your computer, you can save energy by putting it to "sleep." When your computer is in sleep, it's turned on but in a low power mode. It takes less time for a computer to wake up from sleep than it does for the computer to start up after being turned off.

You can put your computer to sleep right away by choosing Apple menu > Sleep. You can also choose to put the computer to sleep automatically when your computer has been inactive for a specified amount of time. You can also set only the display to sleep. If your computer is in the middle of a task that you want to let finish while you are away (for example, burning a DVD), you should set only the display to sleep.

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Mon Jul 06, 2009 9:23 pm







The three URL’s that I found on the internet that talks about “green campus computing” are the following:

Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money
By JOSH KELLER

Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.

Those were a few of the ideas discussed last week at a conference, "Greening the Internet Economy," that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event, held by the University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.

Many of the participants emphasized the importance of systems that could more intelligently measure energy use on the campus. In recent years, colleges have been hurt by the rising costs of powering and cooling their data centers, in part because those costs are difficult to measure and poorly understood (The Chronicle, January 9).

At San Diego, researchers have started work on hardware to help colleges and other organizations understand how to make their servers more efficient. The device, called the GreenLight Instrument, will deploy sensors and software to measure the energy use, humidity, and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Data Center, a popular, self-contained complex of servers.

The goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption, said Thomas A. DeFanti, principal investigator on the project and a senior research strategist at the university's California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology.

"Right now there isn't enough information for somebody to make a definitive decision: Where do I save my money? Do I eliminate disks in my computers, or do I stop them? Do I use more RAM or less RAM?" said Mr. DeFanti. "Nobody has detailed information on this."

Aiming for Precision

Intelligent measuring systems like Greenlight should be extended to allow engineers to more precisely determine how to use energy, said Gary L. Baldwin, director of special projects at the University of California's Citris program. For example, he said, operators at a data center could direct cool air only where the facility is generating the most heat.

Another idea that shows promise, participants said, is to supply computers directly with local DC power. Computers generally use direct current, but the public electricity grid typically supplies alternating current, and 30 percent of the electricity can be lost in the conversion of one form to the other.

Some colleges have started projects to power their computers directly from solar cells or other sources of DC power on the campus, avoiding the energy loss altogether. At San Diego, administrators hope to build a "power ring" that will supply computers across the campus with DC power, said Mr. DeFanti.

The rethinking of how to supply campus power is part of a broader effort to "divorce ourselves from the electrical grid," said Bill St. Arnaud, chief research officer at Canarie Inc., a Canadian computer-networking organization. Power-transmission lines lose a significant amount of energy over long distances, he said, which means that supplying a campus with energy from faraway power plant can be inefficient.

A better strategy, Mr. St. Arnaud said, is to build campus data centers next to a renewable source of power, like a solar plant. High-speed optical transmission lines, he said, would ensure that the computers would seem "as close as next door."

http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm


It is obvious that all the ways of implementing Green Computing based on this url are very difficult to apply on USEP because of the large amount of money that is needed to make that possible. Though, we need much more funds, it would be very helpful to all of us especially to the environment if we apply all those concepts stated in this url which are using GreenLight Instrument to save energy, relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator, replace AC power with DC power, cool the servers only where they get the hottest, and put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.


Sustainable IT in Universities and Colleges June 21, 2008
Posted by Paul Cheeseman

Sustainable IT is a subject that is going to be more and more important for all Higher Education institutions.

I must admit I didn’t realise how important Sustainable IT was until I attended an energy efficiency workshop at Cardiff University. The workshop is part of a series of events, all of which are part of the Managing environmentally sustainable ICT project by JISC and Sust-IT.

All of the presentations were really interesting, Cardiff University also arranged a tour of their brand new server room and High-performance computing (HPC) cluster. It was really good workshop and I’m already signed up for the next event about New Ways of Working.

Apparently the use of natural gas in power stations is decreasing and the use of coal is on the increase. When one of the panel described computers as being ‘Coal Powered’ it certainly made me look differently at IT. I’m now planning a complete review of our server rooms and an investigation into exactly how much electricity we use, and where the inefficiencies are. The panel also made the point that going green is not only good for the environment, there are also huge cost savings that can be made by adopting greener practices. As students become more and more interested in the green credentials of an institution the electricity usage, efficiency and carbon footprint of an institution will become a factor that students begin to consider when selecting an institution.

The rising cost of electricity means that we all have to start taking notice of the electricity we use, if we don’t then energy bills will spiral out of control and cuts in other areas will have to be made to enable institutions to pay their bills. This might sound like doom mongering, but the panel explained that in the private sector decisions to cut staffing and other resources are already being made because of the high cost of electricity.

The British Computer Societey are working on an EU Code of Conduct for server rooms / data centres. Institutions will be able to sign up to the code of conduct when a final version of the document comes out later on this year. I will be looking into this Code of Conduct, and if possible I would like to get Edge Hill signed up to the document. Institutions signing up to the code will be given some EU marketing materials to display withing the institution. Signing up for this EU recognised Code of Conduct would further enhance the green credentials of the institution.

http://blogs.edgehill.ac.uk/coreservices/tag/green-computing/

With this url, it talks about Sustainable IT which is a subject that is going to be more and more important for all Higher Education institutions. The idea of their Green Computing is to make computers ‘Coal Powered’ which is not only good for the environment; there are also huge cost savings that can be made by adopting greener practices. Also, the British Computer Society are working on an EU Code of Conduct for server rooms / data centres. With this concept, USEP can apply the Code of Conduct for the implementation of Green Computing though that Code of Conduct is based from Europe.


Business and Green Computing
15 05 2009
By: Dominik Schulte-Zurhausen, Marketing Manager, Tellumat Telecoms

The term ‘Green Computing’ addresses the efficient use of computer resources by business and individuals alike. As natural persons I like to think that we are all aware of the criticality that our personal and business decisions have on the environment.

However, a business, in the sense of being an entity which has no such innate prerogatives as to be concerned about the environmental impacts that its operations have on the environment can not by itself be expected to factor in the long-term value and importance of initiatives such as ‘Green Computing’.

This is where business decision makers and policy makers need to step in order to steer the organization with awareness and knowledge. Due to the fact that, in most part, these business drivers/custodians are measured by their performance in regards to a single bottom line we can not and should not expect them to divert any attention onto issues that they are not measured, audited or rewarded for.

‘Green Computing’, from a technology point of view, is effective and has the potential to dramatically redress the environmental impact that our business creates. What is needed is not more hype around these technologies, but rather an educated and demanding shareholder base that expects of its executives quantifiable returns on multiple bottom lines. I.e. the triple bottom line: Planet, Profit, People

http://tellumattelecoms.wordpress.com/2009/05/15/business-and-green-computing/

Regarding this url, it talks about business having no such innate prerogatives as to be concerned about the environmental impacts. But all I can say is that, without protecting the environment, business would be impossible to hold because of the many factors that the business have to consider such as the environment. It is not always money that should be considered on having business but also the other factors.


My Blog: http://etelur.blogspot.com/2009/07/green-campus-computing.html

Arrow Rolling Eyes bounce


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PostSubject: Support Green Campus Computing! PART 1   Mon Jul 06, 2009 10:01 pm

I have surfed the net for some 'meaty' discussions about green campus computing, and these are what I found.... [my apologies for having a looong post...the forum reacted it can't be posted'...sorry I just got carried away by the topic. hahaha] lol! have fun reading!

ITEM 1:
Source: San Diego State Green Campus Program
url: http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=23&Itemid=40


PUTTING YOUR COMPUTER TO SLEEP

When you're not using your computer, you can save energy by putting it to "sleep." When your computer is in sleep, it's turned on but in a low power mode. It takes less time for a computer to wake up from sleep than it does for the computer to start up after being turned off.

You can put your computer to sleep right away by choosing Apple menu > Sleep. You can also choose to put the computer to sleep automatically when your computer has been inactive for a specified amount of time. You can also set only the display to sleep. If your computer is in the middle of a task that you want to let finish while you are away (for example, burning a DVD), you should set only the display to sleep.

PC
To automatically put your computer on standby
Open Power Options in Control Panel.
1. In Power Schemes, click the down arrow, and then select a power scheme. The time settings for the power scheme are displayed in System standby, Turn off monitor, and Turn off hard disks.
2. To turn off your monitor before your computer goes on standby, select a time in Turn off monitor.
3. To turn off your hard disk before your computer goes on standby, select a time in Turn off hard disks.

MAC
To set the timing for your computer to sleep:
1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences, and then click Energy Saver.
2. Click Sleep. Click Show Details, if necessary, to see the sleep settings.
3. Drag the top slider to set how long the computer should be idle before going to sleep.
4. If you want to put the display to sleep before the whole computer, select the checkbox labeled "Put the display to sleep when the computer is inactive for" and drag the bottom slider to set the timing for putting the display to sleep.
5. To put only the computer's hard disk to sleep whenever it's inactive, select the checkbox labeled "Put the hard disk(s) to sleep when possible."
6. To wake your computer from sleep, press a key on the keyboard or click the mouse.

To set a daily schedule for putting your computer to sleep (or turning it off and on), click Schedule and select options.
You can set more detailed options for waking and restarting your computer in the Options pane of Energy Saver preferences.
On iBooks and PowerBooks, the computer automatically sleeps when you close the lid.

Notes:
* To open Power Options, click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click Power Options.
* You might want to save your work before putting your computer on standby. While the computer is on standby, information in computer memory is not saved to your hard disk. If there is an interruption in power, information in memory is lost.
* To create a new power scheme, specify the time settings you want, and then click Save As.
* If you're using a portable computer, you can specify one setting for battery power and a different setting for AC power.
* To put your computer on standby, you must have a computer that is set up by the manufacturer to support this option.
* Using Power Options in Control Panel, you can adjust any power management option that your computer's unique hardware configuration supports. Because these options may vary widely from computer to computer, the options described may differ from what you see. Power Options automatically detects what is available on your computer and shows you only the options that you can control.


***********

This site gives step-by-step guide to readers on examples of making effective ways to save energy in using computers. I believe these are just easy steps that can be done by students and teachers alike in their home, office, and schools. Our university can adopt this simple concept by practicing this in computer laboratories or even in offices (as long as they're using computers). I believe this is not that hard to implement. And I also believe that if our school will acknowledge every little way of conserving annual costs (including energy/electricity expenses) the administration should implement this practice in the campus. (I'm talking about making this legal, I mean, as in make conserving computing energy a MANDATE in every office/laboratory in the university). Well, in that case, we all have reasons on making these steps possible. As I've said, this is not that hard. The other institutions are already mandating their staffs to not use computers during lunchbreak, and/or the like... Although the above suggestions won't be nearly impossible since some parts of our campus have very important transactions using the computers, perhaps we can implement these in computer laboratories. Especially when between periods of laboratory classes. Coz I've also noticed that there are some computers which are not turned off or completely plugged out since the other class will be using the units. And there are also cases when there is minimal usage of computers especially when there is no 'formal' laboratory or hands-on session. As mentioned above, putting the computer to sleep mode takes less time to wake up than what it takes a computer to start up. Plus, it takes less energy, thus, making it less hassle for the user (if the user is thinking not to turn it off completely coz it will be used again... :-) )
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ITEM 2:
Source: Alliance to Save Energy: Creating an Energy-Efficient World
url: http://ase.org/content/article/detail/3037

About Green Campus

The Alliance to Save Energy’s Green Campus Program is currently in place on thirteen California university campuses: Humboldt State, CSU Chico, UC Berkeley, UC Merced, UC Santa Cruz, UC Santa Barbara, CSU San Bernardino, Cal Poly Pomona, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, UC Irvine, UC San Diego, San Diego State University, and Stanford University.

Program Goals
* The Alliance to Save Energy’s Green Campus Program is a student-led initiative that educates the campus community on energy efficiency; achieves energy savings; and encourages the next generation of energy efficiency professionals by: Realizing measurable energy savings through research, educational campaigns, technology projects, and facilitation of retrofits;
* Supporting green workforce development through training, mentoring, and integrated academic curricula, internships, and project-based learning;
* Fostering ongoing awareness about the relationship between energy and the environment;
* Developing and implementing campus energy efficiency policy and action;
* Creating effective and lasting partnerships among students, faculty, administrators, and staff within and across campuses.

Program Structure and Resources
* Green Campus interns work closely with administrators, faculty, and staff to create a strategic plan that addresses each of the program’s goals and is uniquely tailored to the needs, challenges, and strengths of their school.
* Green Campus is a student-driven program; each Green Campus school has funding for forty hours of intern time per week.
* The Alliance to Save Energy recruits, selects, and oversees between two and four interns per campus; with supervision from Alliance staff, and input from campus staff, these interns are primarily responsible for the day-to-day implementation of Green Campus at their school.
* The Alliance supports Green Campus interns through continuous remote consultation, regular on-campus visits, and bi- annual program-wide convergences.
* Interns at Green Campus schools have an operating budget that they use to secure space for events, incentivize student conservation, and purchase new metering equipment.

Program Rationale
* Educational campaigns can result in significant energy savings by changing behaviors and purchasing decisions.
* Students are effective advocates on college campus, able to reach their peers and high-level decision makers.
* Students can offer valuable assistance in greening campus operating procedures; student research can defer information gathering costs inherent in switching from conventional to more sustainable practices.
* Green Campus enriches students' educational experience while allowing them to take more responsibility for campus operations.


************

The above site is just one of the many institutions/organizations who present program goals and rationale about implementing green campus computing. We can adopt this kind of movement by implementing similar green campus program structures in our university. In relation to what I stated in the first item, the university has the power and authority to make mandates about the program. In implementing ways to conserve energy, be it simple just like above or greater, we can always find ways in doing every little way to make our campus computing greener. The university can create a council or a certain group that takes over or spearheads the green campus program. The faculty, staff, and students can help by promoting the program goals and objectives to others so that the program will be acknowledged not only by those who are actively part of the spearheading team but also to those who are being shared by the good news. Every success starts by a single step, as what they say. But it would be more successful and remarkable if we not only make the first step but take it by heart and make succeeding steps. This is where the over-all participation of every part of the university comes in. If each USEPian finds the green campus computing movement a very remarkable one just by being aware of the strong program structures, many will realize that the administration is seriously inclined to it thus making it easier for everybody to participate in actively.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

My third item on the next post......PLEASE READ!!!!!


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PostSubject: Support Green Campus Computing! PART 2   Mon Jul 06, 2009 10:02 pm

.....a continuation
ITEM 3
Source: Office of Information Technology - University of Utah
url 1: http://www.it.utah.edu/leadership/green/basics.html
url 2: http://www.it.utah.edu/leadership/green/ewaste.html


url 1:
Green Computing Best Practices for End Users

With thousands of desktop computers in use at the University of Utah, there is a great amount of power used and a great amount of both paper and electronic waste produced. Some simple solutions can help to reduce the impact of these deployments. Please make use of these best practices in order to develop a practice that best fits your individual needs. These suggestions are intended for users who manage their own computer. If you have a computer administrator, you will want to discuss these practices first on order not to interfere with any automated processes that may be running on your computer.

Office Computer-Generated Waste
Important steps toward green computing include modifying paper and toner use, disposal of old computer equipment and purchasing decisions when considering new computer equipment.

Paper Waste
* Print as little as possible. Review and modify documents on the screen and use print preview. Minimize the number of hard copies and paper drafts you make. Instead of printing, save information to disks, or USB memory sticks.
* Recycle waste paper, have a recycle bin at each community printer and copier location.
* Buy and use recycled paper in your printers and copiers. From an environmental point of view, the best recycled paper is 100 percent post-consumer recycled content.
* Save e-mail whenever possible and avoid needless printing of e-mail messages.
* Use e-mail instead of faxes or send faxes directly from your computer to eliminate the need for a hard copy. When you must fax using hard copies, save paper using a "sticky" fax address note and not a cover sheet.
* On larger documents, use smaller font sizes (consistent with readability) to save paper.
* If your printer prints a test page whenever it is turned on, disable this unnecessary feature.
* Before recycling paper, which has print on only one side, set it aside for use as scrap paper or for printing drafts.
* When documents are printed or copied, use double-sided printing and copying. If possible, use the multiple pages per sheet option on printer properties.
* When general information-type documents must be shared within an office, try circulating them instead of making an individual copy for each person. Even better, make the document electronically available to the audience and display it on a projector.

Electronic Waste
* Use the campus network where possible to transfer files. This avoids the need to write CDs or DVDs or use floppy diskettes.
* Use USB memory sticks instead of CDs, DVDs, or floppies.
* Use re-writable CDs and DVDs.
* There are hopes of the University Recycling program addressing e-waste in the near future
o Until then The Recycling Coalition of Utah has resources for e-waste
o Also check the calendar for free e-waste collections

+++++++++++++++++++


url 2:
Hardware Retirement and eWaste at the U

University Policy 3-40 requires equipment which is no longer usable or no longer required by the University to be sent to the University Surplus and Salvage Department (US&S) for disposal. This includes equipment purchased for less than five thousand dollars ($5,000).
* Read the full memo from VP Jeff West posted on the Financial and Business Services website
* Read the equipment Retirement/Transfer instructions
* Complete the equipment Retirement/Transfer form

The US&S Process
All items are initially on sale to University departments for 15 days, then to the general public for a total of 60 days. After that:
* Many electronics are parted at US&S.
* All rechargeable batteries are processed through Environmental Health &Safety (EH&S) for collection from GRX (Guaranteed Recycling eXperts).
* All circuit boards are removed from electronics and sent to Cascade Refining.*
* All wire and metals considered scrap metal and sent to Western Metals and Utah Metals.
* All hard drives are pulled from computers, drives with known sensitive information are crushed and then placed with scrap metal.
* All other drives are "wiped" with DBAN software and resold in US&S.
* Cell phones, collected through US&S are processed through EH&S for disposal with GRX. There are very few due to the university's current cell phone plan which makes the phone the property of the individual and not the University.
* Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) are processed through EH&S and sent to GRX.
* All other items which are not scrap metal (wood, plastics, etc) are placed in the Plant Ops dumpster which is provided by Ace Disposal. Items from this dumpster are sorted at their transfer station and recyclables are processed accordingly.
*Cascade pays better than Western Metals; their refining/smelting process is not known


************

My third item has two url's. I included both because the website is just the same and the topics are somehow related. It can be noticed that even the words 'green campus computing' are not found in the two sources. But I believe that both can be effective ways to achieve the movement. The topics really sparked my interest because somehow I had an experience in MY university (a concrete example!). During the middle weeks of June, as far as I could recall, I've noticed our friendly office clerks and (..and janitors, perhaps) hauling stuffs like papers, boxes/ cartons and loads of newspapers, papers, and papers! hehe..and some CDs, floppy disks, and the like, from our faculty and dean's offices. What made me interested was that I thought of my dad who oftentimes had hard times finding scratch and unused papers to help aid in making bonfire (or whatever you call that...basta panghaling sa kahoy or uling para pangluto..>_< ) so I thought of asking some scratch to bring it home. Only then I realized that they are not just plain outdated newspapers and office scratch papers but also past projects of our higher-years studes. So I and my classmates decided to gather some research studies and projects to have some future reference (well, what a helpful recycle!haha) But then again, not all past projects are in written forms, for we noticed COUNTLESS CDs and floppy drives included in the stuffs. That was when "e-waste" came into my mind. And the thought of the universities' and certain organizations' campaigns to proper e-waste management made me decide to take most of the CD-RWs, floppy disks, etc home (including the papers for my 'panghaling' ^_^ ) so to spend some extra time to inspect it and maybe recycle whatever helpful info I could have from it and recycle the disks itself! Call me weird but I guess i have that strange habit of collecting wastes (even at home! haha!). I also thought of asking the janitors to let me, on behalf of our youth organization in our community, ask it as a source of our fundraising for we may sell it in Bote-Bakal-Dyaryo, etc or Recovery Materials Facility booths. But the janitors said that I can't get it that simple because I might be questioned by the school guards if they notice somebody bringing bulks from the campus through the school gates. Only then I knew that even a single paper that will be brought outside the campus needs a permission. When I asked the janitors where the wastes will be going, they said they will just place it in the proper bin where the CENRO will get it. See? The wastes will be directly collected by the city garbage management disposal team. If only (I thought of this) the university will have programs that manage the mismong e-waste of the campus, we will be able to help the city garbage management disposal team in waste management. The amount of garbage they will have to dispose will be lessened if right in our campus, the wastes (esp. the electronic ones) will be already reduced, reused, and recycled. I hope the school admin will find ways on this matter. I just hope.


More reflections in my blog,
http://www.charmainespeaksup.blogspot.com lol!lol!lol!
I would appreciate anybody's comments especially about my third item on this post. Thank you very much![/left]
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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Tue Jul 07, 2009 10:35 am

1.)http://www.humboldt.edu/~greenhsu/cms/

Green Campus Program at Humboldt State University


The Green Campus Program (GCP) empowers students to lead energy efficiency and conservation campaigns at their universities. Green Campus interns design and implement energy efficiency projects. These projects result in measurable energy savings and reduced carbon emissions for the campus. Green Campus interns are also dedicated to educating the campus community on the relationship between energy use and the environment.

http://www.humboldt.edu/~greenhsu/cms/gc/main/more-about-us

What is Green Campus?
The Green Campus Program is a Statewide student-implemented energy efficiency program at 12 UC and CSU campuses and Stanford University. Green Campus is a program of the non-profit organization The Alliance to Save Energy. The Program has been made possible through grants and funding from the investor-owned utilities (IOUs) and the ratepayers of California. HSU Green Campus operates under the auspices of PG&E, SCE, and UC/CSU/IOU Energy Efficiency Partnership.

Top Ten Ways to Reduce Energy Usage

1.
Turn off lights, appliances and computers when not in use. Even for a few minutes!
2.
Replace incandenscent bulbs with compact fluorescent light bulbs.
3.
Plug electronics into power strips and turn them off when not in use to avoid phantom loads.
4.
Turn down your thermostat and put on a sweater!
5.
Turn your computer Monitor to save mode, screen savers don't save energy! Enable Power Management: In Windows XP; In Mac OS X, You go to 'System Preferences', click on the 'Energy Saver' icon, and set the computer and display (monitor), and Hard Drive to go to sleep. Alternatively, you can use a third-party program, or Press Cmd-Shift-Eject and your OS X Mac will immediately enter sleep mode.
6.
Buy Energy Star® labeled appliances.
7.
When doing laundry, wash full loads and use cold or warm rinses
8.
Take shorter or cooler showers.
9.
Waiting until after 7pm (after peak) to use appliances, such as, washers, dryers, and electric heaters, can help reduce to use of the dirtiest power plants.
10.
Share a fridge with room/suite mates and keep it full.

http://www.humboldt.edu/~greenhsu/cms/gc/main/energy-saving-tips

2.)http://energy.ucsb.edu/EnergyInfo/EnergyTips.htm

UCSB ENERGY


Office Equipment

* Turn off PCs, monitors, printers, copiers, and lights every night and every weekend, If you can't turn off the whole computer, turn off the monitor and the printer
* When purchasing PCs, monitors, printers, fax machines and copiers, consider Energy Star models that "power down" after a user specified period of inactivity
* Enable the energy savings options on existing office equipment
* If appropriate, use ink jet printers - they consume 90% less energy than laser printers
* Implement paper reducing strategies such as double sided printing as a default
* Use e-mail instead of sending memos and faxing documents
* Use shared LAN laser printers instead of individual laser printers
* Use central departmental coffee makers and refrigerators instead of personal units

Lighting

* Turn off all personal task lighting every night and every weekend
* If you are the last person leaving a bathroom or conference room, turn off the lights
* Turn off all unnecessary lighting in corridors
* Replace incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescents (contact Physical Facilities)
* Use light colors when redecorating your office space
* Use day lighting from windows or skylights, instead of electrical lighting, when you can

Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning

* Do not tamper with locking thermostat covers
* Where you have control of your thermostat, set the heating set point no greater than 68 degrees and cooling to no less that 74 degrees
* Do not use personal electric strip heaters or personal "window" air conditioning units
* Use blinds to control solar heat gains
* Make sure all heating and air conditioning systems under your control are turned off every night and every weekend
* Large administrative building air conditioning and heating systems will be off at night and weekends, so if you plan to work during these times, dress warmly or appropriately for the conditions

Elevators

* Avoid using elevators; use stairs.

Summary
Approximately one third of UCSB's power usage is under discretionary control of building occupants. If we faithfully use these energy conservation measures, combined with personal efforts and ideas, we can save up to ten percent of UCSB's electrical and natural gas energy.

3.)http://climate.ku.dk/green_campus/

Green Campus at the University of Copenhagen


The aim of Action Plan 2009 for Green Campus is to help the University of Copenhagen to meet its overall strategic goal of "becoming one of Europe's greenest campus areas". This is specified in "Destination 2012".

The University's most significant focus area is energy consumption; however, if we are to meet our targets, we must spread activities over a wide range of environmental areas.

Action Plan 2009 defines Central Administration's campus programme group's work with Green Campus and includes the following elements:

*
Preparation of an energy action plan for the whole university, applicable from 2010 and containing projections up to 2013 when the goal of a 20% reduction is expected to be met.
*
Development of models for the faculties' energy action plans. Faculty management will be offered the opportunity to discuss aspects of the plans, e.g. applications for grants from the University's central energy pool for individual energy projects.
*
Implementation of Green Action, the University of Copenhagen's campaign for energy-conscious behaviour that ran in February and March, and development of follow-up activities in cooperation with the faculties to ensure continued development of energy-conscious behaviour.
* An invitation to tender for an ESCO pilot project for the Panum Building (the Faculty of Health Sciences). A contract will be entered into and investments will begin in 2009 as part of the third wave of the energy action plan.
* A prioritised catalogue of substantial energy saving projects (second wave of the energy action plan), which will be available in the middle of 2009 as input to the University's budget activities.
* A round of applications in which faculties can apply to the energy pool for funds for energy saving initiatives (first wave of the energy action plan).
* Completion of the Green Accounts 2007 for the University of Copenhagen. Preparation of Green Accounts 2008.
* Planning and implementation of the "Greening Universities" workshop at the IARU climate congress in March. An overall goal for reductions at the 10 IARU universities was presented at the workshop.
* Help with development of the IARU took kit for greening, which will be offered to other universities and organisations.
* Development of guidelines for sustainable campus planning. Green Lighthouse will be used as a pilot project for development activities.
* Development of requirements and requests for energy efficient and environmentally friendly construction and conversions at the University of Copenhagen. The project will be developed in collaboration with the state (the Danish University and Property Agency).
* Help to incorporate energy and environmental requirements into relevant, centralised purchase agreements that will be entered into by the purchase department during 2009. A method will be developed for calculating the proportion of green purchases.
* Help with the development of an action plan for Green IT under the auspices of University IT Coordination.

For me, the university can adopt those all concepts that will surely be useful and helpful to the university especially to the students.
lol!


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fatima paclibar

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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Wed Jul 08, 2009 1:10 pm

Find three (3) URL's that talk's about "green campus computing" and suggest ways how the university can adopt this concept.

When we are talking about “green campus computing” we are talking about our responsibilities as an IT student towards our environment, our contribution on how to use our electronic resources wisely such as computer and how we can minimize electronic waste or the e-waste.

In this assignment, we were given a task to give three URL’s that talk’s regarding green campus computing and how can we adopt or implement it in our own university which is the University of Southeastern Philippines and most importantly it should all begin in ourselves.

The following are the URL’s which talks about green campus computing:

1. http://green.wikia.com/wiki/Green_Computing

The Following are their suggestions:

a) Turn off the monitor when the user will be away for a moment.
b) Set your PC’s on standby mode at a certain point of time.
c) Remove all unnecessary or unused drive.
d) Unplug the CD-ROM if this is not used most of the time.
e) Print wisely. Print only the pages you need and try to avoid print all if it’s not necessary.
f) Refill inkjet cartridges or laser toner rather than to replace it into a new one.
g) Turn off the router, cable modems and WIFI access point when not in used. Avoid turning it on overnight.

Planning to buy new PC? These are their suggestions.

a) Buy laptop than PC because laptops consume less power than desktop does.
b) Buy a computer according to your need.
c) Choose the latest Intel than AMD because it is more environmental friendly though not as powerful as the latter.
d) Consider the 80 plus energy efficient power supply.
e) Choose its parts carefully. Do not install the unnecessary parts when you’re not using them.
f) Choose Corded Keyboard and Mouse over wireless.
g) Inkjet printers use less energy than laser printer. Choose according to your need.

2. http://searchdatacenter.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid80_gci1246959,00.html

In this site, it said that on earliest initiatives towards green computing the United States voluntarily labeling their program the Energy Star. On 1992, Environmental Protection Agency (EPC) was established to promote energy-efficiency on all hardware.

Here are some steps that promote green computing:

a) Power- down the CPU’s when not in used.
b) Try to do computer-related tasks during contiguous, intensive blocks of time, leaving hardware off at other times.
c) Power-up and power-down energy-intensive peripherals such as laser printers according to need.
d) Use liquid-crystal-display (LCD) monitors rather than cathode-ray-tube (CRT) monitors.
e) Use notebook computers rather than desktop computers whenever possible.
f) Use the power-management features to turn off hard drives and displays after several minutes of inactivity.
g) Minimize the use of paper and properly recycle waste paper.
h) Dispose of e-waste according to federal, state and local regulations.
i) Employ alternative energy sources for computing workstations, servers, networks and data centers.

3) http://www.p2000.umich.edu/energy_conservation/ec7.htm

Waste Minimization Procedure
Electrical Conservation Tips:

• Turn the computer off overnight and on weekends;
• Wait until ready to use the PC before turning it on;
• If the computer is going to be inactive for more than 16 minutes, consider turning it off. After this energy needed to run the computer outweighs the start-up energy;
• Do not turn on the printer until ready to print, even an idle printer consumes energy;
• Try to schedule computer-related activities to do them all at once, keeping the computer off at other times;
• If spending a large amount of time at the computer, consider reducing the light level in your office. This may improve cathode ray tube screen visibility as well as save energy.


Technology had given us many advantages that made our daily tasks easier. But as we all know that in all things there is an equal and opposite reaction and in this case, if technology brought us goodness well it have its disadvantages also. We belong to the IT world- the world of the new generation; we have an obligation to educate ourselves on how we can help to promote green campus computing in our university, as well as in our surroundings. Not just to promote and reinforce it but on how we can effectively implement this cause in our university. Knowing that these electronic wastes exist, and we are now informed what we can do to justify the means of green campus computing, thus our responsibility as an IT student does not end in this forum as we made our assignment, and the challenge to make this happens is in our hands.
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Norena T. Nicdao

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PostSubject: GREEN CAMPUS COMPUTING   Wed Jul 08, 2009 1:22 pm

1.)http://chronicle.com/wiredcampus/article/3214/webcasting-a-few-ideas-for-green-computing-on-campus


Webcasting a Few Ideas for Green Computing on Campus

Campus computers are energy hogs. Whether they are dorm room devices or large college data centers, computer processors suck in huge amounts of electricity and give off a lot of heat. What is an energy-conscious (and budget-conscious) CIO to do?

The California State University-Monterey Bay has some ideas. On their education and technology roundtable, Ready2Net, which is both Webcast and broadcast on TV, they tackle computing, energy and the environment.

Casey Green, founder of the Campus Computing project, moderates a panel that includes CIOs from Washington State, San Diego State, Bryant Universities, as well as executives and specialists in high-tech energy conservation from Pacific Gas and Electric and Cisco Systems.

Another place to find useful ideas is The Chronicle’s latest Tech Therapy podcast, “How Green Is Your IT?” Tune in, turn on, and drop your big carbon footprint.—Josh Fischman


2.) http://ready2net.csumb.edu/site/x21966.xml


Green Computing and
Higher Education:
The New "3 Rs"--
Reduce Your Carbon Footprint, Reuse & Recycle (60 minutes)

The dramatic increase in energy consumption and costs have caused a renewed interest in the effective management and use of computing throughout the campus. The proliferation of new computing devices now reaches almost every area of campus service to support instruction, facilities, and student life. Every time we leave computers on without regard for energy conservation and planned use, we potentially waste electricity. Burning fossil fuels generates most of our electricity and also emits pollutants, sulfur, and carbon dioxide into the air. These emissions can cause respiratory disease, smog, acid rain and global climate change. Many campuses are looking to CIOs to conserve energy and to promote more sustainable solutions in labs and data centers. How will CIOs contribute to a more sustainable future?

3.)http://campustechnology.com/articles/2009/06/10/u-connecticut-developing-green-tech-to-clean-up-environment.aspx

U Connecticut Developing Green Tech To Clean Up Environment

* By Dian Schaffhauser
* 06/10/09

The University of Connecticut and VeruTEK Technologies are teaming up to research and develop green chemistry solutions for eliminating the toxic effects of chemical waste in the environment.

VeruTEK, which develops green technologies to clean up the environment, has an option to license any resulting solutions or technology from the project, which will research environmental catalysis and photocatalysis of pollutants.

"We at the Department of Chemistry in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Connecticut are thrilled to be collaborating with Dr. George Hoag and his team at VeruTEK ... in the development of new green chemistry solutions to clean the environment," said department head Steven Suib. "Researchers at VeruTEK are leaders in the field of environmental research and are dedicated to development of functional green technologies. VeruTEK's ongoing projects and products are well thought out, operational, and exciting."


My Opinions...

For me, to promote green technology in our school we must cooperate and do something like:

- use electricity wisely
- turn off other appliances which is not being use like (computer,television,etc.)
- love our environment
- do not use wires in plugging if it is broken


those are the simple ways for us to have a green technology in our environment. We, are the Information Technology (IT) students must adopt this simple ways in a simple mission in our high technology environment.


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joverly gonzales

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PostSubject: Assignment #4   Wed Jul 08, 2009 7:55 pm

“Green Campus Computing”




1.) http://www.p2000.umich.edu/energy_conservation/ec7.htm
***University of Michigan (U-M)

"Green Computing Tip and Practice"


Electrical Conservation Tips:
• Turn the computer off overnight and on weekends;
• Wait until ready to use the PC before turning it on;
• If the computer is going to be inactive for more than 16 minutes, consider turning it off. After this time, the energy needed to run the computer outweighs the start-up energy;
• Do not turn on the printer until ready to print, even an idle printer consumes energy;
• Try to schedule computer-related activities to do them all at once, keeping the computer off at other times;
• If spending a large amount of time at the computer, consider reducing the light level in your office. This may improve cathode ray tube screen visibility as well as save energy.

Paper Conservation Tips:
• Use "paperless" methods of communication such as electronic mail (e-mail) and fax modems. Also, do not print out copies of e-mail messages unless necessary;
• Use smaller font sizes and decrease the spacing between lines, or reformat to keep the document to as few pages as possible;
• Review documents on the screen instead of printing a draft. If you must print a draft, use the blank back side of used sheets;
• Use a printer that can print double-sided documents. When making copies, use double-sided copying;
• The U-M buys and uses recycled-content paper when possible. Look for papers with 50 - 100 percent post-consumer waste and non-chlorine bleached. Also, recycle paper when done.
• Store information on diskettes rather than in "hard copy" format. A single high-density 3.5 inch floppy disk can hold the equivalent of 750 sheets of paper, about one and a half reams. Also, be sure to reuse disks that contain outdated information.
Purchasing and Use of Equipment:
• Printer toner cartridges can be refilled, rebuilt and reused. Many manufacturers will take a spent cartridge, refurbish it, refill it, and return it for about half the price of buying a new one;
• Determine whether you can upgrade your existing equipment rather than purchasing new equipment;
• Donate an old computer to a school or charity; if it is permanently out of order, give it to a computer recycling facility instead of discarding in a landfill;
• Only buy a monitor as large as you really need; a 17 inch monitor uses 40 percent more energy than a 14-inch monitor.
• Consider purchasing an ink jet printer instead of a laser printer.
• Request recycled or recyclable packaging from your vendor;
• Buy soy or non-petroleum based inks. These printer inks are made from renewable resources, require fewer hazardous solvents, which translates to fewer air emissions, and in many cases produce brighter, cleaner colors;
• Try to buy energy efficient products such as those bearing the Energy Star Logo. The Energy Star Program was started by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to encourage the production and use of energy-efficient equipment. In accordance with the EPA's voluntary guidelines, leading computer manufacturers are now producing equipment that can automatically power down to a "sleep mode" to save energy when not in use. They also use up to 30 percent less energy when running than conventional equipment. These added capabilities do not increase price or decrease performance.

==========================================================================================
2.) http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html
***The University of Colorado

"Green Computing Practice"


• Reducing Paper Waste- Minimize the number of hard copies and paper drafts you make. Instead of printing, save information to disks.
• Recycle waste paper- Buy and use recycled paper in your printers and copiers.
• Reusing and recycling- CU generates thousands of spent printer toner and ink jet cartridges and batteries a year. Instead of tossing these in the garbage, they can be recycled, saving resources and reducing pollution and solid waste.
• Purchasing recommendations -Environmentally responsible computer use implies not buying new equipment unless there is a demonstrated need
• Network and share printers- Consider leasing equipment as an alternative to purchasing. Leased equipment is typically refurbished or recycled, and packaging is reduced

=================================================================================================

3.) http://www.wesleyan.edu/newsletter/campus/2008/0208greencomputing.html
*** Westlayan University

"Green Computing Practice"


• Reduce carbon emissions by simply turning off their monitors, or shutting down their computer when they are away.
• always better to shut the computer off if the plan not to use it for a stretch of time
• Night-time remote backup service, a process that would eliminate the need to leave machines overnight.
• Power the Printer off after office hours, or whenever they are not in use.
• Automated power supplies, which work on an electric timer and shut down computers and printers when students’ computer labs are closed.
==================================================================================================
In order to adopt the concept of “Campus Green Computing”, maybe the school should conduct seminars to the faculty and students. Although each one knows about it, they did not always apply it to themselves. To those who know it already, he/she can also give advice to his/her friends. So, when everyone knows about how important the concepts of “Campus Green Computing” everyone can apply to it.
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brian c. namuag

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PostSubject: Green Campus Computing   Wed Jul 08, 2009 9:33 pm

What is Green Computing?


Green computing is the study and practice of using computing resources efficiently. The primary objective of such a program is to account for the triple bottom line, an expanded spectrum of values and criteria for measuring organizational (and societal) success. The goals are similar to green chemistry; reduce the use of hazardous materials, maximize energy efficiency during the product's lifetime, and promote recyclability or biodegradability of defunct products and factory waste.

Modern IT systems rely upon a complicated mix of people, networks and hardware; as such, a green computing initiative must be systemic in nature, and address increasingly sophisticated problems. Elements of such a solution may comprise items such as end user satisfaction, management restructuring, regulatory compliance, disposal of electronic waste, telecommuting, virtualization of server resources, energy use, thin client solutions, and return on investment (ROI).
The imperative for companies to take control of their power consumption, for technology and more generally, therefore remains acute. One of the most effective power management tools available in 2009 may still be simple, plain, common sense.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_computing

What is Green Computing?
Green computing is the environmentally responsible use of technology.

What can I do to “green” my technology use?
• Enable power management on your computer.
• Power down the computer and monitor when not in use.
• Consider plugging your computer and peripherals into a power strip with an on/off switch and turn the entire power strip off when not in use.
• Think before you print. Do you really need a paper copy?
• Use recycled paper if possible
• Use Print Preview to review your job before printing it
• Print in black and white whenever possible.
• Print two-sided whenever possible.
• Reuse unnecessary print jobs as scratch paper.
• Advertise events, parties, etc. electronically or with chalk instead of print-outs.
• Recycle!
o Use the recycling bins around campus to recycle paper, glass, aluminum, and plastic
o Toner on campus can be brought to ISR for recycling
o Beloit College computers and laptop batteries can be brought to ISR for recycling
o Locations for recycling home computers can be found here
o Recycle used alkaline batteries in Pearsons by the mail center or in the Library
• Use email instead of faxes
• If you are in the market for a new computer at home, consider buying an Energy Star compliant computer
• If it’s possible, download software from the web instead of purchasing a physical installation disc

What is Power management and how does it help?

Every day energy is wasted by computers and monitors that are left on when not in use. By simply putting the hard drive and monitor to sleep after a short period of inactivity, huge energy savings can be realized. The computer should wake up with a quick click of the mouse or by pressing a key on the keyboard.

In some cases, you will need to press the power button briefly to wake the computer up. Also, be sure to shut down your computer before leaving for the day and over weekends. Use this handy calculator to get an idea of how much energy and money can be saved.

http://www.beloit.edu/isr/greencomputing.php

Green Computing Saves Green

As computers play an ever-larger role in our lives, energy demands, costs, and waste
are escalating dramatically. Consider the following from the Climate Savers Computing
Initiative:
• In a typical desktop computer, nearly half the power coming out of the wall is wasted
and never reaches the processor, memory, disks, or other components.
• The added heat from inefficient computers can increase the demand on air
conditioners and cooling systems, making your computing equipment even more
expensive to run.
• Even though most of today’s desktop computers are capable of automatically
transitioning to a sleep or hibernate state when inactive, about 90 percent of systems
have this function disabled.
• Some 25 percent of the electricity used to power home electronics—computers, DVD
players, stereos, TVs—is consumed while the products are turned off.

http://www.apcmedia.com/salestools/SLAT-7DCQ5J_R0_EN.pdf

Eco-friendly computing

We can’t live without PCs, but we need to learn how to live with them: they consume too much electricity and generate too much e-waste. A typical PC takes 110 watts to run, and there are almost a billion of them on the planet. And according to the Silicon Valley Toxics Commission, e-waste is the fastest growing part of the waste stream.
The solution is simple
Today's PCs are so powerful that we no longer need one for each person. We can tap into the excess power in one PC and share it with many users. NComputing technology uses just 1 to 5 watts, lasts for a decade, and generates just a few ounces of e-waste.


Save on computer costs & electricity
NComputing systems cost at least 50% less than standard PCs, and since they draw less than 5 watts, you reduce your energy footprint by as much as 90% per user. And because NComputing devices produce practically no heat, they reduce the need for energy-consuming air conditioning. Electricity savings alone can pay for the NComputing virtual desktops in as little as one year. No wonder NComputing has won so many green awards.


http://www.ncomputing.com/GreenComputing/Greencomputing.aspx


My Views

Living in this material world is indeed takes a lot of efforts to boost every excellent performance and good deeds in every little way in our life. We have to think that it is our responsibility to take care our of mother nature. This Green Campus Computing is one of t5he solution of this deteriorating environment of today's generation. Through this, we can help lessen and minimize every pollution into our society. Computers have their own waste that should be segregate well and place in right corner.

How will I going to implement this program to our school? Simply trough campaigns and sharing to every student in school. They have to be aware of this program knowing that they use High Technologies, and it its a privilege to know and learn such moral and valuable lesson. Support Green Campus Computing and be aware to serve and protect our mothers nature.
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Marlie E. Sisneros

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PostSubject: Assignment 4 [All About Green Campus Computing]   Wed Jul 08, 2009 11:17 pm

~Let's go Green!~

eventually my favorite color is GREEN No

Before anything else let us define first what is "green Campus Computing"

~What is Green Computing?

Green computing is the term used to denote efficient use of resources in computing. This term generally relates to the use of computing resources in conjunction with minimizing environmental impact, maximizing economic viability and ensuring social duties. Green computing is very much related to other similar movements like reducing the use of environmentally hazardous materials like CFCs, promoting the use of recyclable materials, minimizing use of non-biodegradable components, and encouraging use of sustainable resources.


Green Computing Practices

Some common green computing practices include turning off the monitor when it's not in use or using more energy efficient monitors like LCDs instead of the traditional CRT monitors, volunteer computing or file sharing practices, virtualization of servers, using more energy efficient and less noisy cooling systems (like using liquid cooling systems instead of the conventional heat sinks and fans), temperature maintenance and regulation to reduce thermal shock wear and tear to computer parts, and increased online security measures through the use of firewalls, anti spyware and anti virus programs to reduce the increasing amount of eWaste on the Internet and on other networks.

REFERENCE SITE: http://www.tech-faq.com/green-computing.shtml

hmhmhp..now, here are he three URLs:

Shocked

1.Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money
By JOSH KELLER



A state court judge not only denied the controversial professor everything he had sought in his lawsuit against the University of Colorado but also negated the jury's verdict that campus officials had violated his First Amendment rights by firing him in response to statements he had made.

Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.

Those were a few of the ideas discussed last week at a conference, "Greening the Internet Economy," that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event, held by the University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.

Many of the participants emphasized the importance of systems that could more intelligently measure energy use on the campus. In recent years, colleges have been hurt by the rising costs of powering and cooling their data centers, in part because those costs are difficult to measure and poorly understood (The Chronicle, January 9).

At San Diego, researchers have started work on hardware to help colleges and other organizations understand how to make their servers more efficient. The device, called the GreenLight Instrument, will deploy sensors and software to measure the energy use, humidity, and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Data Center, a popular, self-contained complex of servers.

The goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption, said Thomas A. DeFanti, principal investigator on the project and a senior research strategist at the university's California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology.

"Right now there isn't enough information for somebody to make a definitive decision: Where do I save my money? Do I eliminate disks in my computers, or do I stop them? Do I use more RAM or less RAM?" said Mr. DeFanti. "Nobody has detailed information on this."

Aiming for Precision

Intelligent measuring systems like Greenlight should be extended to allow engineers to more precisely determine how to use energy, said Gary L. Baldwin, director of special projects at the University of California's Citris program. For example, he said, operators at a data center could direct cool air only where the facility is generating the most heat.

Another idea that shows promise, participants said, is to supply computers directly with local DC power. Computers generally use direct current, but the public electricity grid typically supplies alternating current, and 30 percent of the electricity can be lost in the conversion of one form to the other.

The rethinking of how to supply campus power is part of a broader effort to "divorce ourselves from the electrical grid," said Bill St. Arnaud, chief research officer at Canarie Inc., a Canadian computer-networking organization. Power-transmission lines lose a significant amount of energy over long distances, he said, which means that supplying a campus with energy from faraway power plant can be inefficient.

A better strategy, Mr. St. Arnaud said, is to build campus data centers next to a renewable source of power, like a solar plant. High-speed optical transmission lines, he said, would ensure that the computers would seem "as close as next door."

reference site: http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm

2. Campus Computing and the Environment

In response to the release of the study Environmental Impact of Computer Information
Technology in an Institutional Setting: A Case Study at the University of Guelph the ISC
struck a Green Computing Task Group to review policies, guidelines and practices at the
University of Guelph with respect to the purchase, use and disposal of computers 1 , in order to
make recommendations that would mitigate the environmental impacts of computing on
campus.

Specific Objectives:
§ identify green computing policies and best practices elsewhere and benchmark
the University of Guelph against these practices
§ recommend a campus awareness program
§ identify energy conservation strategies and practices
§ examine the need for and nature of computing procurement guidelines
§ identify equipment disposal procedures
Task Group Conclusions:
When measured against the best practices in the environmental management of computers
throughout the product lifecycle
it is clear that the University of Guelph can improve its
policies and practices. However, the university should take pride in its advanced EWaste
Disposal program and the high level of participation on campus. The well crafted Policy on
Environmental Protection could be strengthened and enhanced by the further development of
sustainability policies and possibly the establishment of a monitoring board. However, the
top priorities identified by the task force involve education, assessment, and collaboration in
the establishment of environmental awareness, policy and practice on campus with regards to
“green computing”.

REFERENCE SITE: http://www.isc.uoguelph.ca/documents/061211GreenComputingFinalReport2006_000.pdf

3. PUTTING YOUR COMPUTER TO SLEEP



When you're not using your computer, you can save energy by putting it to "sleep." When your computer is in sleep, it's turned on but in a low power mode. It takes less time for a computer to wake up from sleep than it does for the computer to start up after being turned off.



You can put your computer to sleep right away by choosing Apple menu > Sleep. You can also choose to put the computer to sleep automatically when your computer has been inactive for a specified amount of time. You can also set only the display to sleep. If your computer is in the middle of a task that you want to let finish while you are away (for example, burning a DVD), you should set only the display to sleep.



PC

To automatically put your computer on standby

Open Power Options in Control Panel.

1. In Power Schemes, click the down arrow, and then select a power scheme. The time settings for the power scheme are displayed in System standby, Turn off monitor, and Turn off hard disks.
2. To turn off your monitor before your computer goes on standby, select a time in Turn off monitor.
3. To turn off your hard disk before your computer goes on standby, select a time in Turn off hard disks.



MAC

To set the timing for your computer to sleep:

1. Choose Apple menu > System Preferences, and then click Energy Saver.
2. Click Sleep. Click Show Details, if necessary, to see the sleep settings.
3. Drag the top slider to set how long the computer should be idle before going to sleep.
4. If you want to put the display to sleep before the whole computer, select the checkbox labeled "Put the display to sleep when the computer is inactive for" and drag the bottom slider to set the timing for putting the display to sleep.
5. To put only the computer's hard disk to sleep whenever it's inactive, select the checkbox labeled "Put the hard disk(s) to sleep when possible."
6. To wake your computer from sleep, press a key on the keyboard or click the mouse.



Notes:

* To open Power Options, click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click Power Options.
* You might want to save your work before putting your computer on standby. While the computer is on standby, information in computer memory is not saved to your hard disk. If there is an interruption in power, information in memory is lost.
* To create a new power scheme, specify the time settings you want, and then click Save As.
* If you're using a portable computer, you can specify one setting for battery power and a different setting for AC power.
* To put your computer on standby, you must have a computer that is set up by the manufacturer to support this option.
* Using Power Options in Control Panel, you can adjust any power management option that your computer's unique hardware configuration supports. Because these options may vary widely from computer to computer, the options described may differ from what you see. Power Options automatically detects what is available on your computer and shows you only the options that you can control.

REFERENCE SITE: http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogcategory&id=13&Itemid=83




[b][b]Recommendation

[b]The majority of universities whose green computing practices have been identified as “best
practices” have well defined sustainability policies and green initiatives managed by
environmental advisory boards, institutes or committees. This provides guidance and a
recognized mandate for the development of campus awareness programs, environmental
purchasing processes, and the establishment of appropriate energy consumption standards,
and energy indicators from which one can benchmark progress. Although beyond the scope
of this task group, it is recommended that the University revisit its policies and consider the
creation of an institutional environmental mandate to build a strong foundation for green
policies, initiatives and programs.


HOW CAN OUR UNIVERSITY ADOPT THESE?


MOST PROBABLY WE SHOULD FOLLOW THE ADVICES, RECOMMENDATIONS AND PROPOSALS OF THOSE URLs.
FOR MORE EFFECTIVE STRATEGY OF HAVING A STANDARD AND ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLY SCHOOL, LET USSTART IT WITH OURSELVES SO THAT WE COULD HELP THE UNIVERSITY BE A GENUINE "GREEN COMPUTING CAMPUS" alien Rolling Eyes
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rosemie nunez

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PostSubject: Green Campus Computing   Thu Jul 09, 2009 5:45 am

Find three(3) URL's that talk's about "green campus computing" and suggest ways how the university can adopt this concept.

SITE:
http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html

---In this site it tells the viewer to use a reusable mug when getting hot drink, in small action that collectively has a big impact.

Reuseable Mugs
Campus Environmental Policies


How the university can adopt:
"If only 15 percent of college students used reusable mugs instead of disposable cups every day, we would eliminate more than a billion cups a year." When you use your reusable mug on campus and in the community you will save money. Our university must start implementing Campus Environmental Policies.



SITE:
http://www.unt.edu/benchmarks/archives/2009/april09/Greencomputing.htm

---In this site it tells the viewer to make saving energy resources and also human resources as well. Go digital instead of a print out.

The other day I got an email from a music organization asking me whether I wanted to get their newsletter digitally or continue to receive it in 'dead tree format'. Well, in addition to being a very effective way to get folks to convert to digital (who wants to get anything 'dead' in the mail?!) it got me to thinking about how technology is SUPPOSED to ultimately save time and resources.
By Dr. Elizabeth Hinkle-Turner


How the university can adopt:
I'm happy to say that our college in the University is adopting some of the ways stated in this site (the professors sends assignments digitally instead of as a print out.). But sadly not all college of the university are implementing it. I think making the school newsletter digitally can really save money, and also resources. It's really a thumbs up for me.. Smile


SITE:
http://www.beloit.edu/isr/greencomputing.php

---In this site it tells the viewer What is Green Computing,What can we do to “green” our technology use, How can we change the computer’s settings to be more green, Some Facts about Power Management

What can I do to “green” my technology use?

* Enable power management on your computer.
* Power down the computer and monitor when not in use.
* Consider plugging your computer and peripherals into a power strip with an on/off switch and turn the entire power strip off when not in use.
* Think before you print. Do you really need a paper copy?
* Use recycled paper if possible
* Use Print Preview to review your job before printing it
* Print in black and white whenever possible.
* Print two-sided whenever possible.
* Reuse unnecessary print jobs as scratch paper.
* Advertise events, parties, etc. electronically or with chalk instead of print-outs.
* Recycle!
o Use the recycling bins around campus to recycle paper, glass, aluminum, and plastic
* Use email instead of faxes
* If it’s possible, download software from the web instead of purchasing a physical installation disc


How the university can adopt:
By simply using emails instead of faxes. Its one way helping our environment. And I think the university must adopt it.Also they must implement in the computer laboratory and in other offices of the university, to power down the computer specially the monitor when not in use.

Resources:
http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy
http://www.unt.edu/benchmarks/archives/2009/april09/Greencomputing.htm
http://www.beloit.edu/isr/greencomputing.php

Visit my blog at rosemienp.com


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PostSubject: Re: Assignment 4 (Due: before July 14, 2009, 13:00hrs)   Thu Jul 09, 2009 8:44 pm



Assignment 4 in MIS: Green Campus Computing

Find three URLs that talks about “Green Campus Computing” and suggest ways on how the university can adopt this concept.

Green Campus Computing Project… from these words alone, I can understand what the topic is all about in my own way. Computing is about the usage of Information Technology. Campus talks about the institution, colleges and universities. Green, I could consider two reasons why is it chosen among the other colors. One maybe is that the project is Kenneth C. Green. The other is the primary purpose of the project “to make the environment green” which means to maintain its natural beauty. as a whole, Green Campus Computing project has the goal to use information technology in campuses without devastating the environment.

Three of the URLs that talk about the Green Campus Computing are the following:


URL 1:
http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm


This article is entitled “Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money.” It is about the ideas to address the problem of environmental and financial cost of Information Technology. These ideas are discussed at a conference “Greening the Internet Economy” held by the University of California at San Diego last week.

One of these is to have intelligent measuring systems like GreenLight instrument by the researchers of San Diego. This instrument can measure the energy used, humidity and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Center, a popular self-contained complex of servers. The goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption, said Thomas A. DeFanti, principal investigator on the project and a senior research strategist at the university's California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology.
Another is to supply computers with local DC power instead of using AC power. It is said that 30% of electricity is lost upon the conversion of AC to DC power. AC is the power supplied in the public electricity grid and DC is the one that computer generally use so there’s a need for conversion.
One more is to relocate campus data centers to a solar power generator, a renewable source of energy. Also, the participants proposed to cool the servers only where they are generating the most heat.


URL 2:


http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2006/10/10/computing

State of Campus Computing
This is about the survey the Campus Computing project conduct in September and October of 2006. It includes responses from the IT officials at 540 colleges and universities. Campus Computing 2006, the 17th edition of the survey by Kenneth C. Green, the project’s executive director, reveals the following findings.
Wireless is ascendant are on the decline and support for open source technologies remain stronger than the actual deployment. The survey found out that security (nearly 30%) was the top issue at every type of the institution, but the runner up varied depending on the institution type. Community colleges and four year private colleges listed instructional integration (16.3%).
“9.9 percent reported a security incident tied to social networking sites like MySpace and Facebook that have become increasingly popular with students, and 11.3 percent of institutions reported security issues related to "the exposure of sensitive data on a computer server not managed by central IT services" (see related article). "Research labs, as well as some academic departments and service units, often want to manage their own data and hardware," said Green of the Campus Computing Project. "But the survey data confirm recent news reports that network servers not managed by central IT services may be particularly vulnerable to hackers."
(Another survey, released this morning at the Educause meeting by CDW-G and Eduventures, finds that 58 percent of the IT managers and directors surveyed at 182 campuses had experienced at least one technology security incident in the previous year. Nine percent reported a loss/theft of personal student information, the survey found.)
Commitment to and implementation of wireless networking continues to build on all types of campuses, the survey shows. More than two-thirds (68.8 percent) of all campuses had a strategic plan in place for deploying wireless technology by this fall, up from 64 percent last year and 53.3 percent in 2004. And the proportion of classrooms in which wireless was already in place continued to climb, too, up to 51.2 percent, up from 42.7 percent in 2005 and 31.1 percent two years ago.
More than half of respondents said they believed open source tools and applications would "play an increasingly important role in our campus IT strategy" -- numbers that neared or exceeded 60 percent at public and private research universities and public four-year colleges. But fewer than a third of campus officials said they viewed open source as a "viable alternative for key campus [administrative computing] applications."
And while a majority of campus officials reported at least sampling if not significantly using open source tools in "backroom" operations, a solid majority described their current strategies for deploying open source applications as either having no interest or currently only "observing" rather than doing,” the survey stated.

URL 3:

http://technologysource.org/article/campus_computing_project/

This is directly quoted from the interview of James Harrison with Kenneth C. Green.
“The Technology Source Archives
at the University of North Carolina

November/December 2002 // Commentary

The Campus Computing Project:
An Interview with Kenneth C. Green
by James L. Morrison and Kenneth C. Green

Note: This article was originally published in The Technology Source (http://ts.mivu.org/) as: James L. Morrison and Kenneth C. Green "The Campus Computing Project:

An Interview with Kenneth C. Green" The Technology Source, November/December 2002. Available online at http://ts.mivu.org/default.asp?show=article&id=1034. The article is reprinted here with permission of the publisher.

Kenneth (Casey) Green is founding director of The Campus Computing Project. Begun in 1990, the project is the largest continuing study of the role of information technology in American higher education. Early in October Green was in Atlanta for the 2002 EDUCAUSE conference to present the results of the 2002 Campus Computing Survey. While at the conference he also received the first EDUCAUSE award for "Leadership in Public Policy and Practice." The award cites his work in creating The Campus Computing Project and recognizes his "prominence in the area of national and international technology agendas and the linking of higher education to those agendas."

I interviewed Casey following his presentation on the results of the 2002 Campus Computing Survey.

James Morrison [JM]: Casey, what prompted you to initiate the Campus Computing Survey?

Casey Green [CG]: The Campus Computing Project, including the annual Campus Computing Survey, was launched in 1990. At that time there really were no national data about the issue of information technology (IT) planning and policy in the context of instructional and scholarly technology.
The mission of the Project has always been to serve the campus community by providing information that will aid and inform campus IT programs, planning, and policy-making. The model has been to follow "the Gretsky rule": as you may know, Wayne Gretsky once commented that as a hockey player, what made him successful was that he skated to where the puck is going, not to where the puck is currently. The Project's activities have been to understand where the puck is and to collect data that helps us all understand where the "digital puck" is going.

JM: Where is the puck going with the use of information technology tools on college and university campuses?



HOW could the university adopt this concept, Campus Computing Project?


Foremost, the university should really have more knowledge on what the project really means. The faculties, staff and even students should understand what the project is all about. they should know the issues involving the use of Information Technology in its connection to the environment. How can they adopt without further knowing the concept? This can be achieved in many ways such as classroom sharing, seminars, orientations, etc.

Since IT also involves computers, the university should set rules and regulations regarding its usage and of course, its strict compliance. one basic example is during the computer laboratory time. the facilitators/instructors should no loner allow their students to turn on their computers once they found out these computers don't work properly. Sometimes, students won't turn off the computers in the hope that it will recover when a fact, they're just wasting the energy consumption. Another is the usage of computing devices in practical way. I mean, if it has the chance to choose computing devices, they should weigh the cost and its power consumption and decide what computer devices should they have.

Those are my suggestions on how the university can adopt the concept of Green Campus Computing Project.


References:

http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm
http://technologysource.org/article/campus_computing_project/
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2006/10/10/computing
http://michaelcorey.ntirety.com/Portals/1101/images/gogreen.jpg


my blog:

http://shielamariepnara.blogspot.com/2009/07/assignment-4-in-hrm.html
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PostSubject: URL's_greencampuscomputing   Thu Jul 09, 2009 11:19 pm

http://emzpequiro.blogspot.com/2009/07/green-campus-computing.html

Green Computing used is the positive (or least negative) relationship between the physical computer and its impact to the environments in which it moves through during its journey from cradle to grave. I've heard about it last year when the third year students introduced it during our Acquaintance Party. The advocacy is just easy. There are steps that we could tag along in order to be a real advocate. However, if these steps are not used on the right track, it's still useless. So, I have three Sites down here that I believe a Green Campus Computing advocate also.

http://siniz0907.blogspot.com/2008/06/its-green-campus-computing-be-cognizant.html

At the current era, IT is undeniably at its way up. High, advanced and fast-changing technologies arise as fast as a blink of an eye.

But all these convenience of technology comes with a price. It's the after effect of what these technologies are causing. We are aware that pollution is at its highest rate today especially with all the advancement that the world has been made. But many of us neglect that ideas of what could happen in the future.

But from where I stand, as an IT student, I think we should do our part in helping out and conserving the environment. And so as any other universities and schools who are greatly involve.

Our university should strongly implement strict policies and regulations in conserving energy, and educate the students about the right ways of using PCs and any other related devices and how they will be able to help in their own ways.

The students, faculty and other users should abide to these rules.

http://www.isc.uoguelph.ca/documents/061211GreenComputingFinalReport2006_000.pdf

The definition of Green Computing used in this report is the positive (or least negative)
relationship between the physical computer and its impact to the environments in which it
moves through during its journey from cradle to grave. In this context the computer’s impact
to the various environments may be measured using any number of the following criteria;

From cradle: Materials from which components are manufactured (recycled or virgin
materials, materials which can be recycled, leasttoxic materials); effluents/by products produced in the manufacturing process (impact of effluents/by products on the environment); assembly methods (ease the disassembly at end of life); packaging materials used for components to facilitate storage and shipping (recycled or virgin materials, materials which can be recycled).

Operational use: Power consumption of each component; interface with user; life cycle
(months/years before replacement is required); other consumables required to maintain.

End of use: Ability to reallocate if no longer required; supplier willing to take computer
components back under recycling program.

To grave: Effective recycling (ease of disassembly, recycle ability
of materials); CO2 travel points (number of miles traveled and fuel consumed to get all components to their final destination); and responsible and safe disposal of toxic components.

* Based on the URL's above, its content is all about the green campus computing and how to care the environment of such institution. In order to do that, or to easily adopt the campus is that I suggests the following ways:

First, the campus shall conduct a survey based on the problem after which make a strategies or policies as well as sanctions for the non-followers of these rules. Then, make a plan on how to conserve energy and what are the ways in proper disposal of the damage devices.

Finally, it required that all students must be aware so, I also suggest that the campus will make a program for the student's awareness; so that they could not say, that they don't know of what they had done wrong for example, charging of any devices inside the campus without any permission is strictly prohibited.

Most of all, not only the campus will abide but the cooperation of all people are highly needed in this matter because if one doesn't cooperate we can not pursued our aim and that is, to have a better life in our institution in which we can enhance our knowledge as well as skills.
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PostSubject: Green Campus Computing   Fri Jul 10, 2009 12:19 am

Find three URLs that talks about “Green Campus Computing” and suggest ways on how the university can adopt this concept.


1. CAMPUS TECHNOLOGY

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2006/08/where-green-and-it-meet.aspx


One of the article on this site entitled Where Green and IT Meet By Linda L. Briggs, caught my attention. She featured some interesting facts about U.S. colleges and Universities. On how much they spend each year on energy and estimates the average PC wastes up to 400 kilowatt-hours of electricity per year. With this, they have discovered that IT people is not that particular when it comes to energy preservation. Although the cost of energy is soaring and computers are voracious energy consumers on campus, many in IT know very little about what their school is doing to save energy. That’s partly because most energy dollars don’t come out of the typical IT budget. The energy it takes to run PCs and servers across campus generally belongs to the facilities side, and is regarded as a set cost of doing business.


Computers are playing a growing role in energy management, as schools rely on sophisticated computerized energy management systems that rival the complexity of mission-critical systems on campus. Adopting a strategic approach to energy management, especially as new buildings are planned or retrofitted, can lower a university’s energy bills by 30 percent or more, according to figures from the government’s Energy Star Web site. Computerized energy management systems, also called building automation systems or direct digital control systems, offer software and hardware specifically for measuring and controlling energy consumption.


This strategy could be apply to our University if and only if many staff, especially the IT personalities would initiate. Though, it would cost that much, but still we will not regret it. As far as I know, Energy management systems are typically connected with different systems across the campus to collect data on everything from room temperatures, CO2 levels, and occupancy rates, to the energy used by soda machines and exit signs. The IT people could be a great help for they have the role for helping to select, install, and manage these complex systems. If this be pursue, hopefully in the near future, a lot of savings on the University overall budget can be acquired. Which we can never denied that it could ultimately benefits everyone.

2. Spend Now, Save Later

You spend roughly 50 cents on energy for every dollar of computer hardware, according to analyst firm IDC. And this figure is expected to increase to 71 cents over the next four years. So if you have the budget for new equipment, these tips can save you money in the long run — and reduce your carbon footprint to boot.

* Power down all electronic equipment when not in use.
* Don’t use screen savers — they consume 28 percent more energy than sleep mode.
* Run updates during the day to avoid leaving PCs on overnight.
* Set printers to sleep mode. They return to active status quickly when new print jobs are submitted.
* Buy Energy Star-compliant products. Americans saved $12 billion last year through the Energy Star program.
* Consider notebooks over desktops wherever feasible. They use up to 90 percent less energy.
* Replace CRTs with LCDs; they use one-half to two-thirds of the energy.
* Consider an all-in-one rather than separate fax, printer and copier. All-in-ones save on electricity and space, and reduce equipment heat emissions.
* Enhance the energy efficiency of your storage infrastructure by using consolidation, storage tie ring, single-instance archiving, snapshot and cloning technology.
Sources: HP, EMC and IDC

As we can see, those listed above are the fundamental ways that we could perform in order for our University to save more, in electricity, space and even reduce equipment heat emissions. Though they are basic, if neither of us will initiate in doing these things, still we can never progress. Let's start on switching off all the electronic equipments especially when not in use. You can take a giant step toward environmentally responsible or “green” computing by conserving energy with your computer. But green computing involves other important steps as well. Again, if we would just support it all the way no more doubts that our University would be one of the prime advocate of Green Campus Computing.

http://emzpequiro.blogspot.com/2009/07/green-campus-computing.html


3. Reducing Paper Waste

Rather than creating a paperless office, computer use has vastly increased paper consumption and paper waste. Here are some suggestions for reducing waste:

* Print as little as possible. Review and modify documents on the screen and use print preview. Minimize the number of hard copies and paper drafts you make. Instead of printing, save information to disks.
* Recycle waste paper.
* Buy and use recycled paper in your printers and copiers. From an environmental point of view, the best recycled paper is 100 percent post consumer recycled content.

Paper usage is really a great part of our University. Especially, during enrollment and even in the day to day basis, paper is very important. But why not recycle and reused paper? It could minimize waste and decrease paper consumption throughout the University.


http://campustechnology.com/articles/2006/08/where-green-and-it-meet.aspx
http://www.edtechmag.com/higher/september-october-2007/seeing-green.html
http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html



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PostSubject: Green Campus Computing   Fri Jul 10, 2009 5:10 pm


Here are some links about "Green Campus Computing":

http://greencampus.winserve.org/greencampus/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogsection&id=7&Itemid=39

TIPS ON HOW TO ELIMINATE WASTE:


Recycling

1) Practice the 4Rs: reduce, reuse, recycle and buy products with recycled content.
2) Recycle white, colored, post-it, shredded and construction paper, empty metal cans, pans, empty clear and colored glass containers, empty plastic bottles, clean plastic wrap and bags, buckets and trays. corrugated (wavy edges) cardboard boxes (please no waxed cardboard and flatten boxes), styrofoam packing forms (but not packing peanuts), chipboard (small office supply boxes), newspaper, telephone books, catalogs, magazines, brochures, paperback and hardcover books, Kraft (brown paper bag) paper, paper ream wrappers, envelopes (windows ok) and file folders. Non-recyclable items: paper cups or plates, tissues or paper towels, food or wet waste, food or liquid stained items, wood or green waste.
3) Reuse paper that has only been used on one side
4) Recycle your old cell phone to prevent hazardous substances from entering our environment. These substances include lead, arsenic, and cadmium, which have been linked with cancer, neurological disorders, and developmental abnormalities. Some helpful links: www.recyclewirelessphones.org and Wireless Foundation’s “Donate a Phone” program: www.wirelessfoundation.org
5) Recycle your ink cartridges through our campus program. E-mail slincoln@sdsu.eduThis e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it to request a postage-paid envelop to mail your used ink cartridge off to a recycling facility6) The SDSU Physical Plant recycles boxes.
7) Recycle your junk mail by depositing it in the large blue trash containers outside the Arrowhead Village or in the trash rooms in Serrano Village.

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http://ecenter.colorado.edu/energy/projects/green_computing.html

GREEN COMPUTING GUIDE
The growing use of computers on campus has caused a dramatic increase in energy consumption, putting negative pressure on CU’s budget and the environment. Each year more and more computers are purchased and put to use, but it’s not just the number of computers that is driving energy consumption upward. The way that we use computers also adds to the increasing energy burden.

Research reveals that most personal desktop computers are not being used the majority of the time they are running and many personal computers nationwide are needlessly left on continuously. Every time we leave computers or lights on we waste electricity. Burning fossil fuels generates most of our electricity and it also emits pollutants, sulfur, and carbon dioxide into the air. These emissions can cause respiratory disease, smog, acid rain and global climate change.


Computer Operating Costs


Over the last fifteen years, computers have transformed the academic and administrative landscape at the University of Colorado. There are now over 18,000 computers on campus. Personal computers (PC) operation alone may directly account for nearly $550,000 per year in University energy costs.
Computers generate heat and require additional cooling which adds to energy costs. Thus, the overall energy cost of CU’s personal computers is more likely around $700,000.

Meeting computer cooling needs in summer (and winter) often compromises the efficient use of building cooling and heating systems by requiring colder fan discharge temperatures. In the summer, these temperatures may satisfy computer lab cooling needs while overcooling other spaces.

Given CU’s commitment to energy conservation and the environmental stewardship, we must address the issue of responsible computer use. By adopting conserving practices, annual savings of $300,000-400,000 are possible.

How Much Energy Does Your Computer System Use?
A typical desktop PC system is comprised of the computer itself (the CPU or the “box”), a monitor, and printer. Your CPU may require approximately 100 watts of electrical power. Add 50-150 watts for a 15-17 inch monitor, proportionately more for larger monitors. The power requirements of conventional laser printers can be as much as 100 watts or more when printing though much less if idling in a “sleep mode.” Ink jet printers use as little as 12 watts while printing and 5 watts while idling.

How a user operates the computer also factors into energy costs. First let’s take the worst case scenario, continuous operation. Assuming you operate a 200 watt PC system day and night everyday, direct annual electrical costs would be over $125 (at $0.075/kWh). In contrast, if you operate your system just during normal business hours, say 40 hours per week, the direct annual energy cost would be about $30 – plus, of course, the cost of providing additional cooling.

Considering the tremendous benefits of computer use, neither of the above cost figures may seem like much, but think of what happens when these costs are multiplied by the many thousands of computers in use at CU. The energy waste dollars add up quickly.

Energy Efficient Computing
Here are some tested suggestions that may make it possible for you to reduce your computer energy consumption by 80 percent or more while still retaining most or all productivity and other benefits of your computer system, including network connectivity.

Screen savers save no energy
If screen saver images appear on your monitor for more than 5 minutes, you are wasting energy! Screen saver programs may save the phosphors in your monitor screen, but this is not really a concern with newer monitors, especially LCD screens. And they do not save any energy.
A screen saver that displays moving images causes your monitor to consume as much as electricity as it does when in active use. These screen saver programs also involve system interaction with your CPU that results in additional energy consumption. A blank screen saver is slightly better but even that only reduces monitor energy consumption by a few percent.

Enable power management features
Thanks to the U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA), personal computer systems purchased today can be easy on energy. These “Energy Star” computers and monitors can be programmed to automatically “power-down” to a low power state when they are not being used. These efficiency gains can be achieved without any sacrifice in computing performance.


This is the most basic energy conservation strategy for any type of equipment. Consider the following:
• Turn off your computer and/or peripherals when they are not in use. Turning on and off will not harm the equipment.

• Don’t run computers continuously unless they are in use continuously.
• Turn off at night and on weekends
• Look for ways to reduce the amount of time your computer is on without adversely affecting your productivity.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm

Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money (by: Josh Keller)

Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.
Those were a few of the ideas discussed last week at a conference, "Greening the Internet Economy," that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event, held by the University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.
Many of the participants emphasized the importance of systems that could more intelligently measure energy use on the campus. In recent years, colleges have been hurt by the rising costs of powering and cooling their data centers, in part because those costs are difficult to measure and poorly understood (The Chronicle, January 9).
At San Diego, researchers have started work on hardware to help colleges and other organizations understand how to make their servers more efficient. The device, called the GreenLight Instrument, will deploy sensors and software to measure the energy use, humidity, and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Data Center, a popular, self-contained complex of servers.

The goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption, said Thomas A. DeFanti, principal investigator on the project and a senior research strategist at the university's California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology.
"Right now there isn't enough information for somebody to make a definitive decision: Where do I save my money? Do I eliminate disks in my computers, or do I stop them? Do I use more RAM or less RAM?" said Mr. DeFanti. "Nobody has detailed information on this."
Aiming for Precision
Intelligent measuring systems like Greenlight should be extended to allow engineers to more precisely determine how to use energy, said Gary L. Baldwin, director of special projects at the University of California's Citris program. For example, he said, operators at a data center could direct cool air only where the facility is generating the most heat.
Another idea that shows promise, participants said, is to supply computers directly with local DC power. Computers generally use direct current, but the public electricity grid typically supplies alternating current, and 30 percent of the electricity can be lost in the conversion of one form to the other.
Some colleges have started projects to power their computers directly from solar cells or other sources of DC power on the campus, avoiding the energy loss altogether. At San Diego, administrators hope to build a "power ring" that will supply computers across the campus with DC power, said Mr. DeFanti.
The rethinking of how to supply campus power is part of a broader effort to "divorce ourselves from the electrical grid," said Bill St. Arnaud, chief research officer at Canarie Inc., a Canadian computer-networking organization. Power-transmission lines lose a significant amount of energy over long distances, he said, which means that supplying a campus with energy from faraway power plant can be inefficient.
A better strategy, Mr. St. Arnaud said, is to build campus data centers next to a renewable source of power, like a solar plant. High-speed optical transmission lines, he said, would ensure that the computers would seem "as close as next door."

How can USeP adopt this concept?
It is true that the earth is suffering from global warming. Global warming is the increasing of average temperature in earth's atmosphere and because of this, many icebergs melted and some mountain in Europe and some part in America experienced avalanche because of global warming. As a student and a citizen in this country, my concern is to save our mother earth. Why? It is because this is the last thing we can pass to the next generation. I do not understand why some student in our university doesn't consider this factor. One time, when I pass to a room in the engineering building (not to mention the floor and room number), the students after having a class to that room, they left their ceiling fan turning on. I do not know if that room will be occupied by the next class. But the main issue their is, you should have to turn off the fan if it not in use whether there are next batch of students to conduct some class their. It is our concern as a student to do that. Turning off some electronic devices when not in use helps a lot to the university in energy consumption and to the mother earth for it reduces the heat contributed by the used electronic devices. Next time, students and as well as faculty and staff of this university should practice of turning off some electronic devices in school especially to those computers turning on but not in use for it contributes heat that makes the earth having more heat leading to global warming and it contributes also for having a high energy consumption.

Another issue is, there are students also in the university doesn't having the concern on putting their garbages in the trash can. They only left their wastes on the lobby or in the room. They not considered the fact that USeP is lack of manpower especially in utility and they should consider this. It is so untidy if we should not keep and put our wastes in its proper area. If we do have this attitude of being tamad of putting our wastes to trash cans, it so very dirty and having some rooms that it's dirty, it reflects to us students of University of Southeastern Philippines that we are untidy too and we dragging the name of our school into shame. Maybe, if we are still practicing this norm, our school may be listed to one of the filthiest college insitution in the country.




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PostSubject: MIS Assignment 4   Sat Jul 11, 2009 4:28 am

Find three(3) URL's that talk's about "green campus computing" and suggest ways how the university can adopt this concept.


Laughing Green Campus Computing Basketball

Green computing is the study and practice of using computing resources efficiently. The primary objective of such a program is to account for the triple bottom line, an expanded spectrum of values and criteria for measuring organizational (and societal) success. The goals are similar to green chemistry; reduce the use of hazardous materials, maximize energy efficiency during the product's lifetime, and promote recyclability or biodegradability of defunct products and factory waste.
Modern IT systems rely upon a complicated mix of people, networks and hardware; as such, a green computing initiative must be systemic in nature, and address increasingly sophisticated problems. Elements of such a solution may comprise items such as end user satisfaction, management restructuring, regulatory compliance, disposal of electronic waste, telecommuting, virtualization of server resources, energy use, thin client solutions, and return on investment (ROI).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_computing


Three (3) URL’s that talks about “Green Campus Computing”

1.http://www.dailyutahchronicle.com/news/campus-computing-comes-up-green-1.345643

Campus computing comes up green

Center works to safely dispose of e-waste
Arthur Raymond
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Published: Friday, September 14, 2007
Updated: Saturday, July 19, 2008

Although students enjoy the stylish new Macs and PCs in computing labs across campus, some might stop to ponder the fate of that dusty, old machine with the sticky keys they loved to hate in last year's class.
The U's Green Computing Resource Center helps ensure that electronic dinosaurs, now known as e-waste, stay out of the landfill, and is addressing a host of other environmental issues created by the vast array of technological hardware and processes at the U.
Andrew Reich, an IT architect at the U, explained that the center is addressing issues "across a broad spectrum of environmental concerns."
Some solutions are simple and can be addressed immediately by anyone who uses a computer on campus, Reich said. Using a thumb-drive in place of burning a CD, utilizing network connections for data transfer instead of other media and simply turning off a machine or monitor when you're done with it are all steps that save energy and resources.
In the bigger view, Reich and others involved with the group are looking at where equipment comes from. A new way of evaluating sustainability in products is the so-called "cradle-to-cradle" design scheme, which determines how easily and efficiently a product can be re-utilized and/or recycled before it's made. These design considerations optimize the ability to deal with the product responsibly when its "useful" life is over.
Currently, e-waste generated at the U is processed via the university surplus and salvage department. This department separates anything that still has "utility" from true waste. Usable items are resold, while waste is handled by Guaranteed Recycling Xperts, a company that contracts with the state and local schools to process this e-waste in an environmentally responsible manner.
The Recycling Coalition of Utah, a non-profit group that advocates and provides information on recycling issues, notes the toxicity of components in used equipment. These components include lead, mercury, hexavalent chromium and brominated flame retardants. All are hazardous and can create long-term issues if not handled properly. GRX deconstructs the outdated machinery at their processing facility in Clearfield and isolates anything containing hazardous materials. Some components are re-utilized and some are recycled. Their stated goal is to return 100 percent of the material to the manufacturing process.
Eric Anderson, a GRX regional manager, said their Clearfield facility is processing about 200,000 lbs. of e-waste every month. This includes what he estimated to be seven to eight pallets of material from the U, collected every three weeks.
In addition to tracking the responsible handling of e-waste, the resource center is looking for ways to reduce systems power consumption, efficiently cool the heat generated by equipment like server-centers and centralizing data operations, with a possible campus data center on the horizon.
Reich hopes the center, which he described as "still in its infancy," can develop into a dynamic resource for evaluating and addressing information technology "green" issues campus-wide. Plans are in the works for coordination with the U's Office of Sustainability.

2. http://chronicle.com/free/2009/01/10296n.htm

Campus Computing Goes Green to Save Money

By JOSH KELLER

Relocate a college's server computers next to a solar-power generator. Replace AC power with DC power. Cool the servers only where they get the hottest. Put the servers in the ocean and power them with waves.
Those were a few of the ideas discussed last week at a conference, "Greening the Internet Economy," that was designed to address the problem of the soaring financial and environmental costs of information technology. The event, held by the University of California at San Diego, offered a sampling of a new generation of technologies that promise to help colleges make their IT departments both more efficient and more sustainable.
Many of the participants emphasized the importance of systems that could more intelligently measure energy use on the campus. In recent years, colleges have been hurt by the rising costs of powering and cooling their data centers, in part because those costs are difficult to measure and poorly understood (The Chronicle, January 9).
At San Diego, researchers have started work on hardware to help colleges and other organizations understand how to make their servers more efficient. The device, called the GreenLight Instrument, will deploy sensors and software to measure the energy use, humidity, and other variables in various parts of a Sun Modular Data Center, a popular, self-contained complex of servers.
The goal is to encourage engineers to try different computing strategies to reduce electricity consumption, said Thomas A. DeFanti, principal investigator on the project and a senior research strategist at the university's California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology.
"Right now there isn't enough information for somebody to make a definitive decision: Where do I save my money? Do I eliminate disks in my computers, or do I stop them? Do I use more RAM or less RAM?" said Mr. DeFanti. "Nobody has detailed information on this."

3. http://www.eschoolnews.com/news/top-news/news-by-subject/school administration/index.cfm?i=53933

School leaders get advice on 'green' computing

Panelists describe strategies to reduce energy costs during a recent CoSN webcast
By Laura Devaney, Senior Editor, eSchool News

With energy costs soaring to record levels, taking steps to reduce energy consumption isn't just good for the environment--it's also essential for the fiscal health of schools. At a recent webinar on "green" computing, panelists discussed several ways school leaders can reduce the power consumption of their technology systems...and ways they can use technology to cut other energy expenditures, too.
"What's going to happen to this world if we don't change our behavior?" asked consultant Karen Greenwood Henke, who moderated the online discussion for the Consortium for School Networking, its host.
Switching a single light bulb to an energy-efficient bulb can save about 300 pounds of carbon dioxide a year, Henke said--and if every family in the United States made the switch, carbon dioxide output would be reduced by more than 90 billion pounds.
"Even small changes can have a big impact," she said.
Information technology (IT) energy usage "will double in the next four years, and there are some easy things in the world of IT that we can do to attack this problem," according to Andrew Verdesca, marketing manager of energy-efficient technologies and services for IBM.
Verdesca used his company as an example of how a wide range of organizations can foster eco-responsibility. IBM offers a program, called Big Green Innovations, that helps school systems, corporations, and other enterprises design more energy-efficient data centers and reduce energy consumption. IBM also operates asset-recovery programs for buying back and disposing of used IT systems.
"eWaste can't be ignored--1 billion computers will become potential scrap by 2010, and only 45 percent of U.S. companies have eco-friendly disposal plans," Verdesca said.
He said diagnosing the power consumption of your current IT systems is the first step in figuring out which systems are taking up the most energy--and determining which systems can be placed in idle mode when they are not being used.
"Just understanding how much power is being consumed is a big part of [solving the problem]," he said.
It's estimated that, in an entire data center, the actual IT systems account for 45 percent of energy use, and power and cooling apparatuses account for 55 percent, Verdesca said. It's also estimated that only 20 percent of an IT system is being used, and the remaining 80 percent is not being used.
"Seizing control of the wasted spaces in systems" is a step in the right direction, he said.
There are things you can start doing right way to "go green" in your schools, said Darrell Walery, director of technology for the Consolidated High School District 230 in Illinois. He added: "A lot of the things, you're already doing."
Walery's district makes use of conference calling and online meetings to save on gas consumption and paper costs, and the district is upgrading certain online communications channels to save on these expenses as well.
With energy costs soaring to record levels, taking steps to reduce energy consumption isn't just good for the environment--it's also essential for the fiscal health of schools. At a recent webinar on "green" computing, panelists discussed several ways school leaders can reduce the power consumption of their technology systems...and ways they can use technology to cut other energy expenditures, too.

My opinion

Green Campus Computing is the best way to reduce the pollution in our country. We could help our mother nature by saving energy like turning your computer off after using. In this simple way, we can help to heal our mother nature. And make our world better place.
The university can adopt this concept by knowing about the project and give some explanation and specific information especially to the students, so that we could aware and learn some important things about Green Campus Computing.



mY bLog: http://stihlyn.blogspot.com/http://stihlyn.blogspot.com/ Arrow
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